Need advice concerning my little niece...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Isabela, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Isabela

    Isabela Guest

    Hi Everyone....

    I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would do--
    take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if no
    one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same
    kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was
    hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can
    have a treat whenever i want one.'

    She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if
    this is just something kids
    do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating mostly
    sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things i have to
    deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating
    cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!

    Any comments or suggestions?

    Thanks for listening--

    isabela
    199/160/135
     
    Tags:


  2. Laura

    Laura Guest

    It is always hard to stay quiet when a loved one is concern. If you are on good terms with your
    sister then maybe suggest that giving chocoloate is not a good idea. Stress the importance of fruits
    and raisons as treats for your neice. Remind your sister of the weight issues that you had growing
    up. Maybe this kid needs some more physical attention from her parents and she has turned to food
    for comfort. (Sound familiar?)

    If you think your sister will react badly to you speaking up then don't go there. It will only cause
    trouble between her.

    "isabela" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone....
    >
    > I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if
    > no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the
    > same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when
    > she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this
    > way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >
    > She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    > just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    > if this is just something kids
    > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things i
    > have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal and
    > eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >
    > Any comments or suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks for listening--
    >
    > isabela
    > 199/160/135
     
  3. Kate Dicey

    Kate Dicey Guest

    isabela wrote:

    > Hi Everyone....
    >
    > I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if
    > no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the
    > same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when
    > she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this
    > way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >
    > She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    > just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    > if this is just something kids
    > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things i
    > have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal and
    > eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >
    > Any comments or suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks for listening--
    >
    > isabela
    > 199/160/135

    If she's saving part of her 'ration' for later, then she's getting no more than she would normally
    have. If she's taking more than her ration, it might be time for a quiet word with her mum. Us mums
    can usually devise ways of 'discovering' these secret stashes without letting on that information
    may have come from someone else. You may need to be tactful with your sister, explaining that you
    think this sort of thing was the start of your own weight problems.

    Your sister might already know, and tell you it's ok: your niece gets rare treats so saving a
    portion for later doesn't affect the over all amount she gets.

    Good luck.

    --

    Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
    http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
    Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
     
  4. Skiur

    Skiur Guest

    I understand your concern. You may be over reacting a little bit, but you're doing it because you
    love your little niece and don't want her going through what you've gone through. I assume that
    you've talked with your sister about your situation. If that's the case you could ask your sister
    about your nieces habits. It could be nothing. My friend's daughter always takes "more for later",
    but it ends up ground into the couch or rug when she finds it.

    Your nieces response to you reminds me of something I would do when I was little. I'd take a treat
    with me for later, but then my mom would take it if she found it. I would take it for later because
    I might want it at another point in the future on my own schedule. We've talked about it since and
    she said it was because she thought that I had the same sweet tooth she does (I don't) and that I
    didn't know how to control myself with sweets (I
    did).

    It was only later in life that I would eat a boatload at a time because I didn't know when the next
    time would be that I could eat a particular treat. My parents would yell at me, tell me what a waste
    of money it was, howe unhealthy it was, and generally given me a hard time for it. So, if I wanted
    something I would have to hide the evidence or eat as much of it as I could somwhere else. I can't
    remember how many times I would buy a big package of something and forced myself to eat the whole
    thing so that I could hide the wrapper/bag. Had a big deal not been made about it, I don't think I'd
    have some of the issues I do have.

    Had someone asked me why I took stuff for "later" I would have told them.

    That's my two cents on the topic.

    Julie

    "isabela" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone....
    >
    > I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if
    > no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the
    > same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when
    > she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this
    > way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >
    > She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    > just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    > if this is just something kids
    > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things i
    > have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal and
    > eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >
    > Any comments or suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks for listening--
    >
    > isabela
    > 199/160/135
     
  5. I don't know the answer. I also have no children but you are being a fine
    aunt to be concerned, perhaps you could talk to a therapist to find out how
    best to proceed, good luck, Lee
    isabela <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone....
    >
    > I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if
    > no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the
    > same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when
    > she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this
    > way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >
    > She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    > just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    > if this is just something kids
    > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things i
    > have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal and
    > eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >
    > Any comments or suggestions?
    >
    > Thanks for listening--
    >
    > isabela
    > 199/160/135
     
  6. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is extremely overweight. Let it be. Let
    mom handle things. Getting involved or saying something may only cause hard feelings - could
    possibly be taken as you pointing out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    much more important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4 years old is too young
    to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is perfectly normal. Kids go through this.
    And chances are if mom is doling out the treats, she is also seeing the daughter take that extra
    piece ... and allowing it. The daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking
    she is getting away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later when mom isn't
    doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a friend who disallowed sugar treats of
    any kind for her kids. As they got older, they went bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes,
    bought it at stores, always behind mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a
    sneak who felt she had to always lie to mom.

    I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I know how I would react (as a
    mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that ever brought up her sons weight problems. Stuff
    like this is very sensitive.

    Joyce

    On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela) wrote:

    >Hi Everyone....
    >
    >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    >do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if
    >no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the
    >same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when
    >she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way
    >i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >
    >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    >just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    >if this is just something kids
    > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things i
    > have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal and
    > eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >
    >Any comments or suggestions?
    >
    >Thanks for listening--
    >
    >isabela
    >199/160/135
     
  7. you make some valid points, Lee
    Joyce <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is extremely overweight. Let it be.
    > Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    saying
    > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as you
    pointing
    > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so much
    more
    > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4 years
    old is
    > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is
    perfectly
    > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out the
    treats,
    > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and allowing it.
    The
    > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking she is
    getting
    > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later when
    mom
    > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a friend
    who
    > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got older, they
    went
    > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores, always
    behind
    > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak who
    felt she
    > had to always lie to mom.
    >
    > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I know
    how I
    > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that ever
    brought up
    > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    >
    > Joyce
    >
    > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela) wrote:
    >
    > >Hi Everyone....
    > >
    > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > >do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know,
    > >if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with
    > >the same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day
    > >when she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell
    > >Mommy...this way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    > >
    > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    > >just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    > >if this is just something kids
    > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things
    > > i have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal
    > > and eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    > > hurt!
    > >
    > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > >
    > >Thanks for listening--
    > >
    > >isabela
    > >199/160/135
     
  8. Skiur

    Skiur Guest

    I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be breeding eventually and I've
    always wondered how to handle a child in regards to the topic of weight control. If they get the
    benefit of dh's metabolism then I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    mine...well I would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it at 0 points is a
    benefit too ;-)

    "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is extremely overweight. Let it be.
    > Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    saying
    > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as you
    pointing
    > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so much
    more
    > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4 years
    old is
    > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is
    perfectly
    > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out the
    treats,
    > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and allowing it.
    The
    > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking she is
    getting
    > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later when
    mom
    > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a friend
    who
    > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got older, they
    went
    > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores, always
    behind
    > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak who
    felt she
    > had to always lie to mom.
    >
    > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I know
    how I
    > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that ever
    brought up
    > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    >
    > Joyce
    >
    > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela) wrote:
    >
    > >Hi Everyone....
    > >
    > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > >do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know,
    > >if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with
    > >the same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day
    > >when she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell
    > >Mommy...this way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    > >
    > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am i
    > >just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion
    > >if this is just something kids
    > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things
    > > i have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal
    > > and eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    > > hurt!
    > >
    > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > >
    > >Thanks for listening--
    > >
    > >isabela
    > >199/160/135
     
  9. you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk, snacks
    will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches
    moderation, you will do fine, Lee
    skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be breeding eventually and I've
    > always wondered how to handle a child in regards to
    the
    > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism then I'd be thrilled. It would
    > be a no brainer. If the inherited mine...well I would worry. You've given me some great "food" for
    > thought-coming it at 0 points is a benefit too ;-)
    >
    > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is extremely overweight. Let it be.
    > > Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    > saying
    > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as you
    > pointing
    > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so much
    > more
    > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4
    years
    > old is
    > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is
    > perfectly
    > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out the
    > treats,
    > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and allowing
    it.
    > The
    > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking she
    is
    > getting
    > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later
    when
    > mom
    > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a
    friend
    > who
    > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got older,
    they
    > went
    > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores, always
    > behind
    > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak who
    > felt she
    > > had to always lie to mom.
    > >
    > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I know
    > how I
    > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that ever
    > brought up
    > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > >
    > > Joyce
    > >
    > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela) wrote:
    > >
    > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > >
    > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > > >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i
    > > >would do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you
    > > >know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow
    > > >up with the same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the
    > > >other day when she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't
    > > >tell Mommy...this way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    > > >
    > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am
    > > >i just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of
    > > >portion if this is just something kids
    > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > > > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult
    > > > things i have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between
    > > > a meal and eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no
    > > > one gets hurt!
    > > >
    > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > >
    > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > >
    > > >isabela
    > > >199/160/135
    >
     
  10. Skiur

    Skiur Guest

    Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.

    Julie

    "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    berlin.de...
    > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    snacks
    > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > [email protected]
    > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    breeding
    > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in regards to
    > the
    > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism
    then
    > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited mine...well
    I
    > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it at
    0
    > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > >
    > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    extremely
    > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    > > saying
    > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as
    you
    > > pointing
    > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    much
    > > more
    > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4
    > years
    > > old is
    > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is
    > > perfectly
    > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out
    the
    > > treats,
    > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and allowing
    > it.
    > > The
    > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking she
    > is
    > > getting
    > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later
    > when
    > > mom
    > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a
    > friend
    > > who
    > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got older,
    > they
    > > went
    > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    always
    > > behind
    > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak
    who
    > > felt she
    > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > > >
    > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I
    know
    > > how I
    > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that
    ever
    > > brought up
    > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > > >
    > > > Joyce
    > > >
    > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > > >
    > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > > > >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i
    > > > >would do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private
    > > > >(you know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her
    > > > >to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her
    > > > >room the other day when she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa,
    > > > >please don't tell Mommy...this way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    > > > >
    > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or
    > > > >am i just over reacting remembering my
    past
    > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something kids
    > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    > > > > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult
    > > > > things i have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice
    > > > > between a meal and eating cake during
    my
    > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    > > > >
    > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > > >
    > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > > >
    > > > >isabela
    > > > >199/160/135
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  11. I have no plans on leaving, I need this group and the people in it to
    continue. Not only do the support post, recipes and tips help me, I am able
    to come here when DH is reaching his tolerance level, He is super supportive
    but even he has limits when it comes to discussing Weight loss, Lee
    skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    >
    > Julie
    >
    > "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    > > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    > snacks
    > > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    > > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > > [email protected]
    > > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > breeding
    > > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in regards
    to
    > > the
    > > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism
    > then
    > > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    mine...well
    > I
    > > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it
    at
    > 0
    > > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > > >
    > > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > extremely
    > > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    > > > saying
    > > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as
    > you
    > > > pointing
    > > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    > much
    > > > more
    > > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4
    > > years
    > > > old is
    > > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food
    is
    > > > perfectly
    > > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out
    > the
    > > > treats,
    > > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    allowing
    > > it.
    > > > The
    > > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking
    she
    > > is
    > > > getting
    > > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later
    > > when
    > > > mom
    > > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a
    > > friend
    > > > who
    > > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    older,
    > > they
    > > > went
    > > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    > always
    > > > behind
    > > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak
    > who
    > > > felt she
    > > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > > > >
    > > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I
    > know
    > > > how I
    > > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that
    > ever
    > > > brought up
    > > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > > > >
    > > > > Joyce
    > > > >
    > > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    > wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > > > >
    > > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > > > > >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i
    > > > > >would do--take
    an
    > > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if no
    > > > > >one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    eating,
    > > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    > > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding her treats and
    > > > > >asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can have a treat
    > > > > >whenever i want one.'
    > > > > >
    > > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with?
    > > > > >Or am i just over reacting remembering my
    > past
    > > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something
    kids
    > > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college,
    > > > > > eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one
    of
    > > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try and
    get
    > > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake during
    > my
    > > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    > > > > >
    > > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > > > >
    > > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > > > >
    > > > > >isabela
    > > > > >199/160/135
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  12. and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a great
    source of inspiration to me when I first came here, Lee
    skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    >
    > Julie
    >
    > "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    > > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    > snacks
    > > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    > > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > > [email protected]
    > > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > breeding
    > > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in regards
    to
    > > the
    > > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism
    > then
    > > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    mine...well
    > I
    > > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it
    at
    > 0
    > > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > > >
    > > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > extremely
    > > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    > > > saying
    > > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as
    > you
    > > > pointing
    > > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    > much
    > > > more
    > > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4
    > > years
    > > > old is
    > > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food
    is
    > > > perfectly
    > > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out
    > the
    > > > treats,
    > > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    allowing
    > > it.
    > > > The
    > > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking
    she
    > > is
    > > > getting
    > > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later
    > > when
    > > > mom
    > > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a
    > > friend
    > > > who
    > > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    older,
    > > they
    > > > went
    > > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    > always
    > > > behind
    > > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak
    > who
    > > > felt she
    > > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > > > >
    > > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I
    > know
    > > > how I
    > > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that
    > ever
    > > > brought up
    > > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > > > >
    > > > > Joyce
    > > > >
    > > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    > wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > > > >
    > > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    > > > > >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i
    > > > > >would do--take
    an
    > > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if no
    > > > > >one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    eating,
    > > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    > > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding her treats and
    > > > > >asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can have a treat
    > > > > >whenever i want one.'
    > > > > >
    > > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with?
    > > > > >Or am i just over reacting remembering my
    > past
    > > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something
    kids
    > > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college,
    > > > > > eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one
    of
    > > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try and
    get
    > > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake during
    > my
    > > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    > > > > >
    > > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > > > >
    > > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > > > >
    > > > > >isabela
    > > > > >199/160/135
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  13. Nathalie W

    Nathalie W Guest

    No and she is greatly missed...
    --
    Nathalie from Belgium
    134.1/101.1/minigoal 99.9 Goal 68 Kg
    134.1/101.2/minigoal 220.3/Goal 150 pounds RAFL 105.3/101.4/96 Kg
    134/1.102/212 lbs "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    berlin.de...
    > and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a great source of inspiration to
    > me when I first came here, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:L8adnc91HIUU9Njd3cwC-
    > [email protected]
    > > Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    > >
    > > Julie
    > >
    > > "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > > berlin.de...
    > > > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    > > snacks
    > > > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    > > > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > > > [email protected]
    > > > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > > breeding
    > > > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in regards
    > to
    > > > the
    > > > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism
    > > then
    > > > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    > mine...well
    > > I
    > > > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming
    it
    > at
    > > 0
    > > > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > > > >
    > > > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > > extremely
    > > > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved
    or
    > > > > saying
    > > > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken
    as
    > > you
    > > > > pointing
    > > > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    > > much
    > > > > more
    > > > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good.
    4
    > > > years
    > > > > old is
    > > > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food
    > is
    > > > > perfectly
    > > > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling
    out
    > > the
    > > > > treats,
    > > > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    > allowing
    > > > it.
    > > > > The
    > > > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking
    > she
    > > > is
    > > > > getting
    > > > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy
    later
    > > > when
    > > > > mom
    > > > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had
    a
    > > > friend
    > > > > who
    > > > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    > older,
    > > > they
    > > > > went
    > > > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    > > always
    > > > > behind
    > > > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a
    sneak
    > > who
    > > > > felt she
    > > > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but
    I
    > > know
    > > > > how I
    > > > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that
    > > ever
    > > > > brought up
    > > > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Joyce
    > > > > >
    > > > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    > > wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband
    > > > > > >will occasionally give her treats
    (chocolate
    > > > > > >usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would do--take
    > an
    > > > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating
    in
    > > > > > >private (you know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    > eating,
    > > > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    > > > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding her treats
    > > > > > >and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can have
    a
    > > > > > >treat whenever i want one.'
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i
    should
    > > > > > >try to help her with? Or am i just over reacting remembering my
    > > past
    > > > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something
    > kids
    > > > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with
    weight
    > > > > > >issues since college, eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was
    one
    > of
    > > > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try and
    > get
    > > > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake
    during
    > > my
    > > > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    hurt!
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >isabela
    > > > > > >199/160/135
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  14. I wish one of us had heard from her just to make sure she is doing OK, Lee
    Nathalie W <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > No and she is greatly missed...
    > --
    > Nathalie from Belgium
    > 134.1/101.1/minigoal 99.9 Goal 68 Kg
    > 295.6/222.8/minigoal 220.3/Goal 150 pounds RAFL 105.3/101.4/96 Kg
    > 232/222.8/212 lbs "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    > > and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a
    great
    > > source of inspiration to me when I first came here, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    > > >
    > > > Julie
    > > >
    > > > "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > > > berlin.de...
    > > > > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    > > > snacks
    > > > > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW
    teaches
    > > > > moderation, you will do fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > > > > [email protected]
    > > > > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > > > breeding
    > > > > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in
    regards
    > > to
    > > > > the
    > > > > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's
    metabolism
    > > > then
    > > > > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    > > mine...well
    > > > I
    > > > > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming
    > it
    > > at
    > > > 0
    > > > > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > > > extremely
    > > > > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting
    involved
    > or
    > > > > > saying
    > > > > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken
    > as
    > > > you
    > > > > > pointing
    > > > > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is
    so
    > > > much
    > > > > > more
    > > > > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good.
    > 4
    > > > > years
    > > > > > old is
    > > > > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing
    food
    > > is
    > > > > > perfectly
    > > > > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling
    > out
    > > > the
    > > > > > treats,
    > > > > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    > > allowing
    > > > > it.
    > > > > > The
    > > > > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her
    thinking
    > > she
    > > > > is
    > > > > > getting
    > > > > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy
    > later
    > > > > when
    > > > > > mom
    > > > > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I
    had
    > a
    > > > > friend
    > > > > > who
    > > > > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    > > older,
    > > > > they
    > > > > > went
    > > > > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    > > > always
    > > > > > behind
    > > > > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a
    > sneak
    > > > who
    > > > > > felt she
    > > > > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said,
    but
    > I
    > > > know
    > > > > > how I
    > > > > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those
    that
    > > > ever
    > > > > > brought up
    > > > > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Joyce
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected]
    (isabela)
    > > > wrote:
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old.
    My
    > > > > > > >sister and her husband will occasionally give her treats
    > (chocolate
    > > > > > > >usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    do--take
    > > an
    > > > > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating
    > in
    > > > > > > >private (you know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    > > eating,
    > > > > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    > > > > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding
    her
    > > > > > > >treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can
    have
    > a
    > > > > > > >treat whenever i want one.'
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i
    > should
    > > > > > > >try to help her with? Or am i just over reacting remembering
    my
    > > > past
    > > > > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just
    something
    > > kids
    > > > > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with
    > weight
    > > > > > > >issues since college, eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was
    > one
    > > of
    > > > > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try
    and
    > > get
    > > > > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake
    > during
    > > > my
    > > > > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    > hurt!
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > >isabela
    > > > > > > >199/160/135
    > > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  15. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    Well, in my view parenting is purely experimental. Each child is different, and the rules as to how
    to handle them seems to change daily (if not quicker). My youngest girl is the skinniest thing you
    have ever seen - was the heaviest of the babies. My son is more muscular and leans more to the junk
    food, has to fight the weight issue also. I don't recall ever getting into fits when they were
    little, they were allowed treats within reason. I did learn quickly though, that the more fuss I
    made about anything, the more it made them lean towards what I was fighting against. Maybe it made
    the issue more desirable? Or made them more curious as to why mom *thought* it was bad? They may not
    always do what I want or approve of, but at least they do keep me informed. I'd rather that than
    deal with the lies and deception. Then again, that's just me. I know my mom was always nagging at
    us, yet set bad eating examples. It didn't do me any good. When I was able to get out on my own, I
    did my own thing regardless.

    Joyce

    On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 22:00:04 -0600, "skiur" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be breeding eventually and I've
    >always wondered how to handle a child in regards to the topic of weight control. If they get the
    >benefit of dh's metabolism then I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    >mine...well I would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it at 0 points is a
    >benefit too ;-)
    >
    >"Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is extremely overweight. Let it be.
    >> Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    >saying
    >> something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as you
    >pointing
    >> out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so much
    >more
    >> important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4 years
    >old is
    >> too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is
    >perfectly
    >> normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out the
    >treats,
    >> she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and allowing it.
    >The
    >> daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking she is
    >getting
    >> away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later when
    >mom
    >> isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a friend
    >who
    >> disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got older, they
    >went
    >> bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores, always
    >behind
    >> mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak who
    >felt she
    >> had to always lie to mom.
    >>
    >> I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I know
    >how I
    >> would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that ever
    >brought up
    >> her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    >>
    >> Joyce
    >>
    >> On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela) wrote:
    >>
    >> >Hi Everyone....
    >> >
    >> >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    >> >occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    >> >do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know,
    >> >if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with
    >> >the same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day
    >> >when she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell
    >> >Mommy...this way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >> >
    >> >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am
    >> >i just over reacting remembering my past issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of
    >> >portion if this is just something kids
    >> > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    >> > mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult things
    >> > i have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between a meal
    >> > and eating cake during my college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    >> > hurt!
    >> >
    >> >Any comments or suggestions?
    >> >
    >> >Thanks for listening--
    >> >
    >> >isabela
    >> >199/160/135
    >
     
  16. Joyce

    Joyce Guest

    Nope, and I've been thinking of her quite a bit lately - wondering how she has been doing. She
    always had so much to offer to this group, and I sure miss her. Suz, if you're out there please
    check in!!!

    Joyce

    On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 23:18:40 -0600, "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a great source of inspiration to
    > me when I first came here, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:L8adnc91HIUU9Njd3cwC-
    > [email protected]
    >> Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    >>
    >> Julie
    >>
    >> "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >> berlin.de...
    >> > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    >> snacks
    >> > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    >> > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    >> > [email protected]
    >> > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    >> breeding
    >> > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in regards
    >to
    >> > the
    >> > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism
    >> then
    >> > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    >mine...well
    >> I
    >> > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it
    >at
    >> 0
    >> > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    >> > >
    >> > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    >> extremely
    >> > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    >> > > saying
    >> > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as
    >> you
    >> > > pointing
    >> > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    >> much
    >> > > more
    >> > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4
    >> > years
    >> > > old is
    >> > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food
    >is
    >> > > perfectly
    >> > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out
    >> the
    >> > > treats,
    >> > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    >allowing
    >> > it.
    >> > > The
    >> > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking
    >she
    >> > is
    >> > > getting
    >> > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later
    >> > when
    >> > > mom
    >> > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a
    >> > friend
    >> > > who
    >> > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    >older,
    >> > they
    >> > > went
    >> > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    >> always
    >> > > behind
    >> > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak
    >> who
    >> > > felt she
    >> > > > had to always lie to mom.
    >> > > >
    >> > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I
    >> know
    >> > > how I
    >> > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that
    >> ever
    >> > > brought up
    >> > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    >> > > >
    >> > > > Joyce
    >> > > >
    >> > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    >> wrote:
    >> > > >
    >> > > > >Hi Everyone....
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband
    >> > > > >will occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing
    >> > > > >that i would do--take
    >an
    >> > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you know, if no
    >> > > > >one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    >eating,
    >> > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    >> > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding her treats and
    >> > > > >asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can have a treat
    >> > > > >whenever i want one.'
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with?
    >> > > > >Or am i just over reacting remembering my
    >> past
    >> > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something
    >kids
    >> > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college,
    >> > > > > eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one
    >of
    >> > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try and
    >get
    >> > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake during
    >> my
    >> > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > >Thanks for listening--
    >> > > > >
    >> > > > >isabela
    >> > > > >199/160/135
    >> > > >
    >> > >
    >> > >
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
     
  17. I was just thinking about her yesterday. I hope she's okay. She mentioned awhile back that she was
    reading the messages, but wasn't replying. Perhaps she'll see our thread and jump in to say hi?

    Brenda

    "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Nope, and I've been thinking of her quite a bit lately - wondering how she
    has
    > been doing. She always had so much to offer to this group, and I sure
    miss her.
    > Suz, if you're out there please check in!!!
    >
    > Joyce
    >
    > On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 23:18:40 -0600, "Miss Violette"
    <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a
    great
    > >source of inspiration to me when I first came here, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >message news:[email protected]...
    > >> Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    > >>
    > >> Julie
    > >>
    > >> "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > >> berlin.de...
    > >> > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    > >> snacks
    > >> > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    > >> > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > >> > [email protected]
    > >> > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > >> breeding
    > >> > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in
    regards
    > >to
    > >> > the
    > >> > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's
    metabolism
    > >> then
    > >> > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    > >mine...well
    > >> I
    > >> > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming
    it
    > >at
    > >> 0
    > >> > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > >> > >
    > >> > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > >> extremely
    > >> > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved
    or
    > >> > > saying
    > >> > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken
    as
    > >> you
    > >> > > pointing
    > >> > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is
    so
    > >> much
    > >> > > more
    > >> > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good.
    4
    > >> > years
    > >> > > old is
    > >> > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing
    food
    > >is
    > >> > > perfectly
    > >> > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling
    out
    > >> the
    > >> > > treats,
    > >> > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    > >allowing
    > >> > it.
    > >> > > The
    > >> > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her
    thinking
    > >she
    > >> > is
    > >> > > getting
    > >> > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy
    later
    > >> > when
    > >> > > mom
    > >> > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had
    a
    > >> > friend
    > >> > > who
    > >> > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    > >older,
    > >> > they
    > >> > > went
    > >> > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    > >> always
    > >> > > behind
    > >> > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a
    sneak
    > >> who
    > >> > > felt she
    > >> > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but
    I
    > >> know
    > >> > > how I
    > >> > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those
    that
    > >> ever
    > >> > > brought up
    > >> > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > Joyce
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    > >> wrote:
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband
    > >> > > > >will occasionally give her treats
    (chocolate
    > >> > > > >usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    do--take
    > >an
    > >> > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating
    in
    > >> > > > >private (you know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    > >eating,
    > >> > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    > >> > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding her treats
    > >> > > > >and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can
    have a
    > >> > > > >treat whenever i want one.'
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i
    should
    > >> > > > >try to help her with? Or am i just over reacting remembering
    my
    > >> past
    > >> > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something
    > >kids
    > >> > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with
    weight
    > >> > > > >issues since college, eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was
    one
    > >of
    > >> > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try
    and
    > >get
    > >> > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake
    during
    > >> my
    > >> > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    hurt!
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >isabela
    > >> > > > >199/160/135
    > >> > > >
    > >> > >
    > >> > >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
     
  18. Kristin

    Kristin Guest

    And while we're at it... Joy too. Oh Joyyyyyy... SuzyyyyyQ.... anyone??? We MISS YOU!

    --

    ~Kristin O~
    272/239.4/172

    "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Nope, and I've been thinking of her quite a bit lately - wondering how she
    has
    > been doing. She always had so much to offer to this group, and I sure
    miss her.
    > Suz, if you're out there please check in!!!
    >
    > Joyce
    >
    > On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 23:18:40 -0600, "Miss Violette"
    <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a
    great
    > >source of inspiration to me when I first came here, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >message news:[email protected]...
    > >> Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    > >>
    > >> Julie
    > >>
    > >> "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > >> berlin.de...
    > >> > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    > >> snacks
    > >> > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    > >> > fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > >> > [email protected]
    > >> > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > >> breeding
    > >> > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in
    regards
    > >to
    > >> > the
    > >> > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's
    metabolism
    > >> then
    > >> > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    > >mine...well
    > >> I
    > >> > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming
    it
    > >at
    > >> 0
    > >> > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > >> > >
    > >> > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > >> extremely
    > >> > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved
    or
    > >> > > saying
    > >> > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken
    as
    > >> you
    > >> > > pointing
    > >> > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is
    so
    > >> much
    > >> > > more
    > >> > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are good.
    4
    > >> > years
    > >> > > old is
    > >> > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing
    food
    > >is
    > >> > > perfectly
    > >> > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling
    out
    > >> the
    > >> > > treats,
    > >> > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    > >allowing
    > >> > it.
    > >> > > The
    > >> > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her
    thinking
    > >she
    > >> > is
    > >> > > getting
    > >> > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy
    later
    > >> > when
    > >> > > mom
    > >> > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had
    a
    > >> > friend
    > >> > > who
    > >> > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    > >older,
    > >> > they
    > >> > > went
    > >> > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    > >> always
    > >> > > behind
    > >> > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a
    sneak
    > >> who
    > >> > > felt she
    > >> > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but
    I
    > >> know
    > >> > > how I
    > >> > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those
    that
    > >> ever
    > >> > > brought up
    > >> > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > Joyce
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    > >> wrote:
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband
    > >> > > > >will occasionally give her treats
    (chocolate
    > >> > > > >usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    do--take
    > >an
    > >> > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating
    in
    > >> > > > >private (you know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    > >eating,
    > >> > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had with
    > >> > > > >food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding her treats
    > >> > > > >and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can
    have a
    > >> > > > >treat whenever i want one.'
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i
    should
    > >> > > > >try to help her with? Or am i just over reacting remembering
    my
    > >> past
    > >> > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something
    > >kids
    > >> > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with
    weight
    > >> > > > >issues since college, eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was
    one
    > >of
    > >> > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try
    and
    > >get
    > >> > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake
    during
    > >> my
    > >> > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    hurt!
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > >> > > > >
    > >> > > > >isabela
    > >> > > > >199/160/135
    > >> > > >
    > >> > >
    > >> > >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
     
  19. I sure hope so, Lee
    Brenda Hammond <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was just thinking about her yesterday. I hope she's okay. She
    mentioned
    > awhile back that she was reading the messages, but wasn't replying.
    Perhaps
    > she'll see our thread and jump in to say hi?
    >
    > Brenda
    >
    > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Nope, and I've been thinking of her quite a bit lately - wondering how
    she
    > has
    > > been doing. She always had so much to offer to this group, and I sure
    > miss her.
    > > Suz, if you're out there please check in!!!
    > >
    > > Joyce
    > >
    > > On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 23:18:40 -0600, "Miss Violette"
    > <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > and you reminded me, Has anyone heard from Susi q lately, she was a
    > great
    > > >source of inspiration to me when I first came here, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > >message news:[email protected]...
    > > >> Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    > > >>
    > > >> Julie
    > > >>
    > > >> "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > > >> berlin.de...
    > > >> > you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true
    junk,
    > > >> snacks
    > > >> > will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW
    teaches
    > > >> > moderation, you will do fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    > > >> > [email protected]
    > > >> > > I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    > > >> breeding
    > > >> > > eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in
    > regards
    > > >to
    > > >> > the
    > > >> > > topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's
    > metabolism
    > > >> then
    > > >> > > I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited
    > > >mine...well
    > > >> I
    > > >> > > would worry. You've given me some great "food" for
    thought-coming
    > it
    > > >at
    > > >> 0
    > > >> > > points is a benefit too ;-)
    > > >> > >
    > > >> > > "Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > >> > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >> > > > Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    > > >> extremely
    > > >> > > > overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting
    involved
    > or
    > > >> > > saying
    > > >> > > > something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be
    taken
    > as
    > > >> you
    > > >> > > pointing
    > > >> > > > out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is
    > so
    > > >> much
    > > >> > > more
    > > >> > > > important than who she is, even though your intentions are
    good.
    > 4
    > > >> > years
    > > >> > > old is
    > > >> > > > too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing
    > food
    > > >is
    > > >> > > perfectly
    > > >> > > > normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is
    doling
    > out
    > > >> the
    > > >> > > treats,
    > > >> > > > she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and
    > > >allowing
    > > >> > it.
    > > >> > > The
    > > >> > > > daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her
    > thinking
    > > >she
    > > >> > is
    > > >> > > getting
    > > >> > > > away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy
    > later
    > > >> > when
    > > >> > > mom
    > > >> > > > isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I
    had
    > a
    > > >> > friend
    > > >> > > who
    > > >> > > > disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got
    > > >older,
    > > >> > they
    > > >> > > went
    > > >> > > > bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at
    stores,
    > > >> always
    > > >> > > behind
    > > >> > > > mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a
    > sneak
    > > >> who
    > > >> > > felt she
    > > >> > > > had to always lie to mom.
    > > >> > > >
    > > >> > > > I know my answer is going against what many others have said,
    but
    > I
    > > >> know
    > > >> > > how I
    > > >> > > > would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those
    > that
    > > >> ever
    > > >> > > brought up
    > > >> > > > her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    > > >> > > >
    > > >> > > > Joyce
    > > >> > > >
    > > >> > > > On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected]
    (isabela)
    > > >> wrote:
    > > >> > > >
    > > >> > > > >Hi Everyone....
    > > >> > > > >
    > > >> > > > >I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old.
    My
    > > >> > > > >sister and her husband will occasionally give her treats
    > (chocolate
    > > >> > > > >usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i would
    > do--take
    > > >an
    > > >> > > > >extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my
    eating
    > in
    > > >> > > > >private (you know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really
    > > >eating,
    > > >> > > > >lol) and i just don't want her to grow up with the same kinds of issues that i had
    > > >> > > > >with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the other day when she was hiding
    her
    > > >> > > > >treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't tell Mommy...this way i can
    > have a
    > > >> > > > >treat whenever i want one.'
    > > >> > > > >
    > > >> > > > >She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i
    > should
    > > >> > > > >try to help her with? Or am i just over reacting remembering
    > my
    > > >> past
    > > >> > > > >issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just
    something
    > > >kids
    > > >> > > > > do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with
    > weight
    > > >> > > > >issues since college, eating mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was
    > one
    > > >of
    > > >> > > > >the most difficult things i have to deal with in order to try
    > and
    > > >get
    > > >> > > > >healthy. If given the choice between a meal and eating cake
    > during
    > > >> my
    > > >> > > > >college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets
    > hurt!
    > > >> > > > >
    > > >> > > > >Any comments or suggestions?
    > > >> > > > >
    > > >> > > > >Thanks for listening--
    > > >> > > > >
    > > >> > > > >isabela
    > > >> > > > >199/160/135
    > > >> > > >
    > > >> > >
    > > >> > >
    > > >> >
    > > >> >
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    >
     
  20. Connie

    Connie Guest

    I'll second that!! You're funny too!!

    Connie

    skiur wrote:
    > Lee, you're great. :) Please don't leave this group.
    >
    > Julie
    >
    > "Miss Violette" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    >
    >>you are already ahead as you will not have an overload of true junk,
    >
    > snacks
    >
    >>will be towards the healthy and you will not be extreme as WW teaches moderation, you will do
    >>fine, Lee skiur <[email protected]> wrote in message news:j8WdneQaQrDuxtjd3cwC-
    >>[email protected]
    >>
    >>>I think you're bringing up a lot of good points. dh and I will be
    >>
    > breeding
    >
    >>>eventually and I've always wondered how to handle a child in regards to
    >>
    >>the
    >>
    >>>topic of weight control. If they get the benefit of dh's metabolism
    >>
    > then
    >
    >>>I'd be thrilled. It would be a no brainer. If the inherited mine...well
    >>
    > I
    >
    >>>would worry. You've given me some great "food" for thought-coming it at
    >>
    > 0
    >
    >>>points is a benefit too ;-)
    >>>
    >>>"Joyce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>>Well, this is just my opinion, based on having a nephew who is
    >>>
    > extremely
    >
    >>>>overweight. Let it be. Let mom handle things. Getting involved or
    >>>
    >>>saying
    >>>
    >>>>something may only cause hard feelings - could possibly be taken as
    >>>
    > you
    >
    >>>pointing
    >>>
    >>>>out that your niece is overweight already or that her weight is so
    >>>
    > much
    >
    >>>more
    >>>
    >>>>important than who she is, even though your intentions are good. 4
    >>>
    >>years
    >>
    >>>old is
    >>>
    >>>>too young to worry and I do think her behavior as to stashing food is
    >>>
    >>>perfectly
    >>>
    >>>>normal. Kids go through this. And chances are if mom is doling out
    >>>
    > the
    >
    >>>treats,
    >>>
    >>>>she is also seeing the daughter take that extra piece ... and allowing
    >>>
    >>it.
    >>
    >>>The
    >>>
    >>>>daughter stashing it may just be somewhat of a game - her thinking she
    >>>
    >>is
    >>
    >>>getting
    >>>
    >>>>away with something that mom wouldn't allow (eating that candy later
    >>>
    >>when
    >>
    >>>mom
    >>>
    >>>>isn't doling out the treats), yet mom is well aware of it. I had a
    >>>
    >>friend
    >>
    >>>who
    >>>
    >>>>disallowed sugar treats of any kind for her kids. As they got older,
    >>>
    >>they
    >>
    >>>went
    >>>
    >>>>bonkers - snuck the candy at friends homes, bought it at stores,
    >>>
    > always
    >
    >>>behind
    >>>
    >>>>mom's back. One daughter ended up anorexic, the other just a sneak
    >>>
    > who
    >
    >>>felt she
    >>>
    >>>>had to always lie to mom.
    >>>>
    >>>>I know my answer is going against what many others have said, but I
    >>>
    > know
    >
    >>>how I
    >>>
    >>>>would react (as a mother) and how my sil has reacted to those that
    >>>
    > ever
    >
    >>>brought up
    >>>
    >>>>her sons weight problems. Stuff like this is very sensitive.
    >>>>
    >>>>Joyce
    >>>>
    >>>>On 29 Feb 2004 05:55:30 -0800, [email protected] (isabela)
    >>>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>>>Hi Everyone....
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I am concerned with my little niece who is only 4 years old. My sister and her husband will
    >>>>>occasionally give her treats (chocolate usually) and i see her doing the same thing that i
    >>>>>would do--take an extra piece and stash it for 'later'. I did most of my eating in private (you
    >>>>>know, if no one SAW me eat then i wasn't really eating, lol) and i just don't want her to grow
    >>>>>up with the same kinds of issues that i had with food/sweets. I followed her into her room the
    >>>>>other day when she was hiding her treats and asked her why. She said 'Aunt Isa, please don't
    >>>>>tell Mommy...this way i can have a treat whenever i want one.'
    >>>>>
    >>>>>She is a beautifuly little girl but is this something that i should try to help her with? Or am
    >>>>>i just over reacting remembering my
    >>>>
    > past
    >
    >>>>>issues with food? I don't want to blow this out of portion if this is just something kids
    >>>>> do. (Idon't have any children...) I have struggled with weight issues since college, eating
    >>>>> mostly sweets--and while under(semi)control now, it was one of the most difficult
    >>>>> things i have to deal with in order to try and get healthy. If given the choice between
    >>>>> a meal and eating cake during
    >>>>
    > my
    >
    >>>>>college years, well, hand over the cake to me and no one gets hurt!
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Any comments or suggestions?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Thanks for listening--
    >>>>>
    >>>>>isabela
    >>>>>199/160/135
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >

    --

    Cheers,

    Connie Walsh

    241.5/201/155 RAFL 210.5/201/198.5 2nd 10% 219.5/201/198
     
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