Need advice on training program



diane143

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Feb 14, 2004
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Long post warning! :) Newbie to road bikes here. Real ones that is, I spent my childhood between my Columbia 3 spd and Dad's Raleigh, then picked up a $25 tag sale 10 spd to tool around in when I moved out of the house. That was replaced by a Huffy hybrid in the mid-90's and last year I started mountain biking (bought a Haro for that). DH gave himself a nice road bike for xmas and I'd really like to train and ride with him. His goal is to do a century this year (but not necessarily a race).

Now to training. I have the Huffy on an old wind trainer and he has his new bike on a new magnetic trainer.

I bought Sally Edwards book on indoor/outdoor cycling training (had her heart rate monitor book already) but am a little disappointed on the structure of training, ie I don't think there is much structure at all. The workouts are great, I just don't know if I should be doing them in a particular order.

This is what I use for weight training at the gym: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0679754814/ref=pd_cpt_gw_2/102-6222926-8050556 (plus the abs, shoulders etc books). They have very detailed workout plans in them. I'm very detailed oriented, but have a hard time starting something new and making a plan. Hence my disappointment in the Sally E book. :(

I also looked at the Training Bibles by Joe Friel and they seemed a little better but realize I should read them a bunch of times before they make complete sense. :D

So in your collective wisdom, what do you think is a decent direction to go in? I like doing the different workouts (they keep me from getting bored). I understand the importance of varying workouts, in length and intensity. I painfully showed that to myself by "training" myself to do 30 minute step classes and then trying a 45 min one.

Should I continue with the Edwards workouts or is there something else I should be reading? My goal is really to keep up with DH. ;) He seems to be working more on building seat time right now, he's up to 90 mins or so (I'm still around 45 max from a weird work schedule and a knee acting up a bit).

We also went to the LBS the other night and they started to fit me to a Cannondale, I think it was the R500. Feels nice. :) Not sure of the possibility of an outside ride with the weather up here in the northeast. I am not planning on spending a fortune on my first road bike (although the price does seem like a fortune to me LOL).

Thanks for any advice, sorry for the length!

Diane
 

2LAP

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Feb 22, 2002
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Looks like your having some fun.... but what advice did you need?
 

diane143

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Feb 14, 2004
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Originally posted by 2LAP
Looks like your having some fun.... but what advice did you need?

LOL I was too verbose! :)

Looking for info on a good book or ????? that will guide me on training for 50-100 mile rides.

Since I have never done this before I have no idea of the proper combination of interval, duration and recovery rides (which I realize varies a bit from person to person anyway).

I just don't feel the Sally Edwards Heart Rate Monitor Book for Outdoor & Indoor Cyclists does a good job of putting things in order, even though I love the rides and info in there.

Thanks!

Diane
 

angrydave

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Jul 29, 2003
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Originally posted by diane143
LOL I was too verbose! :)

Looking for info on a good book or ????? that will guide me on training for 50-100 mile rides.

Since I have never done this before I have no idea of the proper combination of interval, duration and recovery rides (which I realize varies a bit from person to person anyway).

I just don't feel the Sally Edwards Heart Rate Monitor Book for Outdoor & Indoor Cyclists does a good job of putting things in order, even though I love the rides and info in there.

Thanks!

Diane

I wish my wife was as interested as you. I just built up a trek 2300 WSD for her, and I'm afraid it will mostly sit.

In any case, in my vast experience (yeah right) the best thing you can possibly do is ride. Unless you're planning to race the thing, you should definitely make comfort one of the top priorities when you select that new bike, (and cannondale is good place to start) and start racking up the miles. Even if you are in good physical condition, you will find that the bike stresses completely different muscle groups. Even to some extent mountain vs road. I started back on the bike a few years ago on a MTB and really thought I'd be good to go on the road bike, but WOW was I in for a shock.

I got back into form by just doing the long rides. I catch the local guys headed out on Sundays and rode with them as long as I could. Befroe long I was able to hang, and now sometimes I set the pace. We have a Cat 1 rider that shows up now and again, and needless to say, HE sets the pace on those days.

As far as books, the thing is, with cycling, its different for everyone, so I dont find them to be as broadbased as they should be. My recomendation might be something from Carmichael.

There is some VERY good information on this forum. I use this place as a one of my primary training aids :).

Good luck, spin the cranks, and pass that man.
 

diane143

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Feb 14, 2004
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Originally posted by angrydave
Good luck, spin the cranks, and pass that man.

That's my goal! :D I just know how tough it's going to be, about the only thing I've ever beaten him in is blading and that didn't happen often. I am lighter, I have a bunch of weight to lose and my cardiovascular is a bit better than his, so I have some hope. And determination. ;)

I hear you about the muscles! I had been doing step and weights and spinning. My first mtb trip was great but after that my legs started giving out much sooner than I thought they should. I want to prevent that this year!

I've been poking around here all weekend and expect to continue learning a lot here. Will probably make another trip to the LBS tomorrow after work. :cool:

Thanks for the reply!

Diane
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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I hear you about the muscles! I had been doing step and weights and spinning. My first mtb trip was great but after that my legs started giving out much sooner than I thought they should. I want to prevent that this year!

If you can't get out on the bike, more time on the trainer is good. It doesn't have to all be at the same time (perhaps 2-3 sessions in a day). Since you don't appear to be planning to race, I don't think interval training is too important at this stage, other than giving you the ability to shoot over a small hill.
On the trainer, I would focus on light loads and high cadence. This will help you to get a smooth pedalling style once you get into the outside world. It will also encourage you not to use too big a gear when you do your century.

Have fun.
 

diane143

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Feb 14, 2004
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Yes, I have a tendency to do big gears, always have. Candence computer is on the way, till then I've set up some BPM playlists on my iPod.

Is the reason for higher cadence to lessen muscle fatigue over a long distance? I haven't played around enough to really understand that.

A race would be fun but I think I'm a long way from that. Something to aim for though. :)

Diane
 

EoinC

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Feb 9, 2004
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Is the reason for higher cadence to lessen muscle fatigue over a long distance? I haven't played around enough to really understand that.
High cadence is a (generally) more efficient use of muscles. It promotes full-circle pedalling (ie applying tangental pressure to the cranks through the full 360 degrees, from both legs) as opposed to the push / space / push of non-clipped riding or the push / space / pull / space of low-cadence clipped riding.
Pushing large gears can damage your knees (you have already pointed out that you have a problem there).
I ride a fixed-wheel track bike on the road, so taking off necessitates slow turning of a big gear, but, once up to speed, I try (depending on traffic) not to drop below 80rpm. I generally try to stay around 100rpm to be in my stride.
Pushing a big gear utilises only a very small group of leg muscles, whilst spinning a low gear spreads the load.

Have fun.
 

diane143

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Feb 14, 2004
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Knees: patella pain. Started with the creaking in the left knee in 97 or so and I really hurt it working on my kitchen floor last October. (dumb, no knee pads, won't do that again!). Physical therapist says I'm fixable though so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

Thanks for the explanation, it really helps!


Diane
 

mymilkexpired

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Feb 17, 2004
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Knees: patella pain. Started with the creaking in the left knee in 97 or so and I really hurt it working on my kitchen floor last October. (dumb, no knee pads, won't do that again!). Physical therapist says I'm fixable though so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

Sounds like my right knee, but i broke it and my femur almost 3 years ago. Its healing like a champ but spinning gears are the way to ride for logevity of the knee. I have done quite a few 30 mile rides with no issue and one 50 mile ride. Im gearing up for the MS150 this year (houston to austin. its going to be 182 miles over 2 days). Im not sure if its the same for you as it is for me, but my knee always feel better after a nice long ride, its really flexible and doesnt ache as much as it does when im not active
 

sathomasga

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Jul 29, 2003
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Originally posted by diane143
LOL I was too verbose! :)

Looking for info on a good book or ????? that will guide me on training for 50-100 mile rides.

[...]

Thanks!

Diane

The Complete Book of Long-Distance Cycling: Build the Strength, Skills, and Confidence to Ride As Far As You Want by Ed Burke and Ed Pavelka
 

elrohwen

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Jul 13, 2003
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I only got into biking last summer (my dad's been into it for years and I finally decided to give it a shot). I chose the a loop around a lake at a local park that's 5 miles. The first time I went out, one lap was enough. However, every other week or so I was able to add another loop until I was riding 25 miles. I never had a real training program other than getting on the bike and doing it. Living in a hilly area, the natural hills provide plenty of hill training and I wasn't really worried about speed or passing ability. Now that I'm more in shape, I'm working on intervals and more technical things so that I can possibly race in the fall. But overall, I agree with what the others have said: More time on the bike is really the best way to do it. You can have the most detailed training plan in the world, but nothing helps more than just getting out there and riding. By the end of the summer, I did a bike tour of 60 miles a day for two days ... sure I was tired, but I never bonked. And I did all of that after only a few months of very non-specific training.
 

angrydave

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Jul 29, 2003
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Originally posted by sathomasga
The Complete Book of Long-Distance Cycling: Build the Strength, Skills, and Confidence to Ride As Far As You Want by Ed Burke and Ed Pavelka

Pavelka is the guy I was trying to think of when I was going to recommend a specific book. I read that and found it very useful in planning my training.

Dave
 

peterwright

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Mar 5, 2003
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I would strongly recommend sticking with Joe Friels training bible. It is underpinned by very good principles (periodisation etc) which seems to be just the structure you are looking for. If you want a more personalised programme then you might consider some coaching. If you are interested in more info on this then please send me a private message and I would be glad to try and help further.

Good luck

Peter
 

diane143

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Feb 14, 2004
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Thanks! I saw the Friel books and will look up the others. They sound great. Can't wait to get started on something other than the old Huffy. :)

Diane