Need Advice Re: Tri Bike...Brands, Dos, Donts, etc..

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by mbehr22, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. mbehr22

    mbehr22 New Member

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    All advice appreciated.

    I have been to all my local shops to get a pros advice....now I want advice from everyone here

    I am a beginning biker (not a diehard anyway) and have been looking at the Motobecan Nemesis. Is this a good bike to start with? Only 1200 new, and thats a bit high for my budget.

    I dont know enough about bike value to really get a deal on ebay.

    I need a 58 cm frame....6-0, 185...so ive been told

    thanks again
     
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  2. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    That's probably not the best bike to start with. Tri specific bikes tend to be pretty uncomfortable for regular road riding. Get up on one at a shop and ask yourself if that's the possition you want to be in every time you go out for a ride. At your level, a regular road bike with a good set of clip on aero bars is much more suitable.
     
  3. mbehr22

    mbehr22 New Member

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    What would you recommend? Brands...wt...etc...

    What are "tri" bike more uncomfortable and what are the biggest differences (parameter/set-up wise) b/w a road and tri bike.

    thanks again
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    I'm not gonna write the book,but suggest you do some research before laying out the bucks. Some LBS might be a place to start. Beyond me why a newbie would even be thinking a tri bike.
     
  5. OCRoadie

    OCRoadie New Member

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    It's really hard to recomend a bike as there are so many to choose from. We are all different and what works for me, may not suit yourself. That said, I would look at the entry level and mid-level bikes from Specialized, Trek, Cannondale and Giant. These are all major bike companies that stand behind their product and they offer complete bikes with good components for fair price. You should be able to pick up a bike with Shimano 105 for less than a $1000. Right now is a good time to look for good deals on last years models. Go test ride the bikes that fit your budget and pick the one you like best. As far as Motobecane goes, they used to be a great manufacturer, I have a friend that recently bought one, and I don't think too highly of it.
     
  6. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    In general, a tri bike has a steeper seat tube, longer top tube, and bigger drop from the seat to the bars than a regular road bike. The overall position is tipped forward and stretched out. This adds up to better power transfer and aerodynamics, but won't be a whole lot of fun for training or sightseeing rides. The bars on tri bikes are also banned from mass start road races, so if you're thinking of competing beyond triathlons, you would have to change the bars, brake levers, and shifters.

    As far as road bikes in that price range, it mostly comes down to what your local shops carry. Look for a place that has a good service reputation. For $1000 to $1200 the big name brands (Cannondale, Trek, Giant, Specialized...) are going to perform about the same, so go with what fits best and you can get locally.
     
  7. mbehr22

    mbehr22 New Member

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    Thnks OC

    I have been to numerous LBS and the one guy who I trust the most told me that most big brands all come from the same factory pretty much....a lot of the elite manuf have consolidated/been bought out and all (specialized, trek, CD, etc...) and are pretty much a Tiawian factory job at this point.

    He told me to get a 58 (but that varies depending on the co.'s frame setup) and to bring it in for him to set me up....he has all the tools to get me pos.'d right.

    i was told bikesdirect.com is a great place to start
     
  8. OCRoadie

    OCRoadie New Member

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    It's true that a lot of bikes are manufactured at Giant's factory in Taiwan. I believe Cannondale still makes all of there frames in the USA. Some of the Specialized and Trek models are still made in the USA. Personally, I don't have a problem with my frame coming from Taiwan. If they've invested the most in the technology and equipment, they are probably doing the best job.

    A 58cm frame is a good place for you to start, but it's all relative to the frame's geometry and the style of riding you intend to do. It sounds like you guy at the LBS is on the right track, a proper fit will ensure the most hapiness out of your new ride. Good Luck...
     
  9. mbehr22

    mbehr22 New Member

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    Yeah--my gut told me that this guy wasnt a run of the mill salesman and that he knew his stuff. Very nice guy, told me that each frame would vary (geometry-wise, like you stated) and that is why he wanted me to bring it in (or ship it to him) so he could set it up and configure it to my build.

    I would like some more feedback on the road v. tri bike...

    Differences, pros, cons, etc....

    why go 'road' ?

    why not tri?

    i already have a trek MB....but i want something more suited for the streets

    thanks
     
  10. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    You might want to take a look at this:
    http://www.wrenchscience.com/WS1/Secure/Fitting/Height.asp
    It will give you a much more complete idea of where to start than just the nominal frame size.
     
  11. OCRoadie

    OCRoadie New Member

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    One last bit, if you're going to purchase your frame or bike online, make sure you find a store that has the same bike and test ride it. You want to be sure of the sizing and feel before you ante up. Do not just figure that you need a 58 and buy it without a test ride.

    Your question about tri bikes shouldn't be so difficult. If you're doing tris or time trialing, then look at tri specific bikes. If you want an all around road bike, then don't get a tri bike. The differences are in the geometry and components. A tri bike will generally have a more aggresive geometry that will put you in a more aerodynamic position (flat back). Tri bikes will probably come with aero bars with bar end shifters. There are other differences that also make it a poor decision unless you mainly intend on using for tris. The most sensible option as someone else already mentioned is to get road bike and add some clip-on aero bars if you want to ride in that position.
     
  12. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    what a load from an obvious moron.
     
  13. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    That nose picker is a moron.
     
  14. brown.be

    brown.be New Member

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    Hey i have a motobecane nemesis and love it. Its listed at 1200 bucks but I got them down to 1000. For rear ultegra and front 105 you won't beat it. I however use it only for tri's. Like everyone else said, if you are not going to use it only for tri's and want to use it for road racing I wouldn't get a tri bike. Just get a nice road bike in that price range and you can always add a nice set of clip on aero-bars. Good luck
     
  15. little_chicken

    little_chicken New Member

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    Why would you even consider a tri bike unless you race them .. and even in this case, I would really get a dedicated bike if you goal is to finish in the top half.

    I race du's and got into dedicating a bike for my races. Now I am building another pure road bike bcs its so uncomfortable on long distances. Probably half of the elite guys (and I am not even close to them) run on regular road bikes with minor adjustements.. Don't waste your money, get a good road one and in two yrs if you still see the need get into serious set-up changes ..
     
  16. triguy98

    triguy98 New Member

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    Are you planning on RACING these tris or just DOING them? Have you ran one at all so far? My first season of tris was spent renting various bikes, racing various course sets up, and eyebaling the whole thing in preperation for the next season. I would do the same if was you. Rent a few bikes. Try em out. Determine what you like.

    Me, personally, got a tri bike. It fits me just fine. I only race tris, no road racing. All my riding is spent in preperation for tris. I have no problems with long distance rides on it. It DOES take a lot of getting used to. I also have the luxury of a 7 mile park loop close by and long road with bike lanes, as well, so the environment is conductive to riding only a tri bike. If i had to worry about traffic, I would say get the road bike so youre controls are all right there.

    Also, in your budget, you can get lot nicer of a road bike than you can a tri bike. $1600 seems to be the min. for a decent tri bike.

    Rent, rent, rent, then make up your own mind.
     
  17. arz

    arz New Member

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    I agree with everyone here...if your not going to use the bike purely for triathlon your better off looking at a road bike in your price bracket. I race pretty seriously in triathlon and have a road bike...the only really difference between tri bike and a road bike is the geometry of the frame and aero bars (which arent really that much of an advantage unless doing long distance tri and some find it more comfortable). I spend alot of time on the road training and racing...I found a road bike to be more comfortable. Hope this helps and u find a bike! I have just spent months looking for the right bike dont rush it take your time and get the best bike for u and try lots of bikes dont get your heart set on a cartain brand or bike!
     
  18. mbehr22

    mbehr22 New Member

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    thanks arz and triguy

    i too have been looking for a few months, trying to get info and pricing down b/f i spend a wad of $...

    thanks for the input. BTW, i havent competed in a tri yet, but i am looking forward to it. i found a couple of beginners websites and a book on amazon that gave me some good advice regarding my training. im still at least 18 months out (if things go as planned) and have been hitting the weights hard for a few years, but close to a year ago decided to add cycling to my cardio regiment.....this led me to where i am today. i want to take it to the next level and mix it up a bit. running loses it luster after a while. i never realized how tough swimming could be.

    im sure ill get flamed for this by some of the people in this thread, but the trek i have (MB) has the aero bars on it and i have been using that as my sole means (cycling) and that is why im in the market for a true road bike (or a tri bike)

    i was assuming that if i am to compete in a tri eventually, why not go ahead and get the bike that i plan on using in a tri? that way i could be more comfortable with my equipment, rather than go from a road to tri to actual competition...

    someone correct me if im wrong here
     
  19. mbehr22

    mbehr22 New Member

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  20. triguy98

    triguy98 New Member

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    Youre not looking to even start tri-ing for another 1 1/2? Are you in semi decent shape? If so, start looking at sprints. Do a couple mid to late season tris. Just 1 a month for a couple months. Rent a bike to race. I did all my training last season on a MTB. It worked, it wasnt exactly the best thing, but I def. didnt die on my bike leg and had lots of juice for the run, so theres nothing wrong with it. I read an article bout a pro who does the same thing.

    If youre set on not doing a tri for that long, save up the coin and get a solid Ultrega bike. That bikesdirect site didnt exactl yhave bargains with road bikes. I've seen much better deals at my LBS on Ultrega bikes.

    I had a motobecane once upon a time. It was a trail bike, full rigid. No complaints, but I cant comment on thier road bikes or current build quality. Cant really go wrong with Felt. I just dont have any dealers round these parts, so no personal experience. I've heard nuttin but good things, tho. IT looks like a decnt price, but if I'm buying a dedicated tri bike, I want it AERO.
     
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