need an easy to use bike rack

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bike, Aug 1, 2003.

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  1. Bike

    Bike Guest

    I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it gets
    my car muddy.

    I only have to carry 1 bike and I have a 2 inch hitch. Is a hitch rack the way to go?

    I don't have a garage so I can't leave the bike on the rack (now I usually just leave it in the
    car). I usually have to get the bike in the morning when I'm headed to work and in a hurry. If my
    carrier is to much trouble I'm sure I'll just revert back to using the cargo area.

    I'm thinking I would like to store the carrier in cargo area when it's not in use. When I'm ready to
    ride I'll just attach the rack and throw the bike on it. A lot of racks have to be screwed on and
    I'm sure this will take to much time.

    I jus bought a Yakima TerraFirma but it's way to complicated. The rack must be screwed into the
    hitch but it does have a wrench attached. I'm gonna take it back in the morning and look for
    something easier.

    Can anyone recommend a rack?
     
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  2. On Fri, 01 Aug 2003 22:01:46 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    >putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it gets
    >my car muddy.

    Isn't that why you bought a big-ass SUV? Cargo space for your rough and tumble adventure gear? <G>

    Get a rubber mat for the cargo area, they're about $100 from most any auto accessory store.

    Barry
     
  3. >I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    >putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it gets
    >my car muddy.

    Simple solution - ride bike to trail, leave gas-guzzler at home. No scratching or dirt in precious
    car, less gas bill.

    Steve
     
  4. Bike

    Bike Guest

    I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now. That is the
    reason I bought the big-ass SUV but it's still to small for my bike.

    On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 11:01:46 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 01 Aug 2003 22:01:46 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    >>putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it
    >>gets my car muddy.
    >
    >Isn't that why you bought a big-ass SUV? Cargo space for your rough and tumble adventure gear? <G>
    >
    >Get a rubber mat for the cargo area, they're about $100 from most any auto accessory store.
    >
    >Barry
     
  5. On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 07:42:47 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now.

    You could put a fork mount on a 2x6, knock 1/2 the rear seat down, and stand the bike up inside. A
    second rubber mat can protect the back of the folded seat from mud.

    OTOH, the more expensive hitch mount racks, like the better Yakima, Sportworks, or Hollywoods,
    fold up when not in use. Some fold down when the bike is on, allowing access to the rear gate.
    Some even accept ski mounts, etc... for other seasons. Be prepared to spend $200-250 or so for a
    really good model.

    I prefer roof racks, but large SUV's are a bear to load. I rule out roof racks on anything I can't
    load from the ground, because along with being a PITA to load, clearance problems often result.

    I had a company-provided Yukon for a while, and I was very disappointed in the "utility" of the
    vehicle. While it was truly a king of towing, a nice interior and all the easily scratched plastic
    inside left me under whelmed for a $35-40k vehicle. Great for transporting a few folks in luxury,
    but the "sport" aspect was also lost on me.

    Barry
     
  6. MTBScottie

    MTBScottie Guest

    bike <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    > putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it
    > gets my car muddy.
    >
    > I only have to carry 1 bike and I have a 2 inch hitch. Is a hitch rack the way to go?
    >
    > I don't have a garage so I can't leave the bike on the rack (now I usually just leave it in the
    > car). I usually have to get the bike in the morning when I'm headed to work and in a hurry. If my
    > carrier is to much trouble I'm sure I'll just revert back to using the cargo area.
    >
    > I'm thinking I would like to store the carrier in cargo area when it's not in use. When I'm ready
    > to ride I'll just attach the rack and throw the bike on it. A lot of racks have to be screwed on
    > and I'm sure this will take to much time.
    >
    > I jus bought a Yakima TerraFirma but it's way to complicated. The rack must be screwed into the
    > hitch but it does have a wrench attached. I'm gonna take it back in the morning and look for
    > something easier.
    >
    > Can anyone recommend a rack?

    If you are interested, I have a brand new, never been used, Yakima Roc 2 hitch rack that will fit a
    2 inch receiver. I put on an extra cradle to hold 3 bikes. I never got around to getting a hitch on.
    Like you, I have a Honda Passport SUV, and I put the seats down and lay the bike down in the back.
    Yep, it gets muddy and scratched inside, but it's an SUV, and that's what they are truly made for.
    Clean up the mud and put the seats back up and you don't see a thing.

    I am asking 200 for the entire thing, and if I need to ship it out, that is included in the price.

    Let me know
     
  7. bike <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    > putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it
    > gets my car muddy.

    Aw, wouldn't want to get the inside of your truck muddy or anything. Don't you feel dumb driving a
    huge stupid POS like that back and forth to work every day?

    CC
     
  8. Gary Schmitt

    Gary Schmitt Guest

    "bike" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    > putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it
    > gets my car muddy.
    >
    > I only have to carry 1 bike and I have a 2 inch hitch. Is a hitch rack the way to go?
    >
    > I don't have a garage so I can't leave the bike on the rack (now I usually just leave it in the
    > car). I usually have to get the bike in the morning when I'm headed to work and in a hurry. If my
    > carrier is to much trouble I'm sure I'll just revert back to using the cargo area.
    >
    > I'm thinking I would like to store the carrier in cargo area when it's not in use. When I'm ready
    > to ride I'll just attach the rack and throw the bike on it. A lot of racks have to be screwed on
    > and I'm sure this will take to much time.
    >
    > I jus bought a Yakima TerraFirma but it's way to complicated. The rack must be screwed into the
    > hitch but it does have a wrench attached. I'm gonna take it back in the morning and look for
    > something easier.
    >
    > Can anyone recommend a rack?
    >

    The sportworks (http://www.bicycleracks.com/) hitch mounts are great. Fold up when not in use (but
    you have to fold it down to use tailgate/hatch; if you have a hatch with a window that opens then
    you needn't fold it down). They are quick and easy. No need to remove the wheel, and they fit all
    frames and sizes (I often have my kids 10" bike on right behind mine). I leave mine on the vehicle
    all the time. It wouldn't be the kind you'd want to take off an on for every ride though. Good luck.
     
  9. Clyde_in_tn

    Clyde_in_tn Guest

    Corvus Corvax wrote:
    > bike <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    >>putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it
    >>gets my car muddy.
    >
    >
    > Aw, wouldn't want to get the inside of your truck muddy or anything.

    Like the sticker on our XTerra said: "It's supposed to get dirty, stupid!"
     
  10. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 12:01:36 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:
    > On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 07:42:47 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now.
    >
    > You could put a fork mount on a 2x6, knock 1/2 the rear seat down, and stand the bike up inside. A
    > second rubber mat can protect the back of the folded seat from mud.

    You can get the fork mounts from Performance for $10 each. I've known a few people that have used
    these, mounted on a 2x6 or something like that. It seems pretty nice to be able to keep the bike
    inside the vehicle from a security perspective, even if it is kind of a mess.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  11. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 12:01:36 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:
    > > On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 07:42:47 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now.
    > >
    > > You could put a fork mount on a 2x6, knock 1/2 the rear seat down, and stand the bike up inside.
    > > A second rubber mat can protect the back of the folded seat from mud.
    >
    > You can get the fork mounts from Performance for $10 each. I've known a few people that have used
    > these, mounted on a 2x6 or something like that. It seems pretty nice to be able to keep the bike
    > inside the vehicle from a security perspective, even if it is kind of a mess.
    >

    That's exactly what I did...cheap Avenir fork mounts screwed to 1/2 inch plywood - and I was able to
    get two bike in the back of a Bronco II - not exactly Tahoe sized.

    The OP needs to throw a blanket/bedsheet down if he's worried about mud, make a fork-mounter so
    nothing rattles and scratches the truck, and then go ride. It's easy.

    Chris
     
  12. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I'm thinking I would like to store the carrier in cargo area when it's not in use. When I'm ready
    >to ride I'll just attach the rack and throw the bike on it.

    The reason I bought a carrier for my 'burb is that I'd rather not have my bike embed itself in the
    back of my neck in a minor traffic accident.

    Having the rack stored in the driver/passenger area seems as bad or worse.

    How about a hitch-mount rack that folds up somewhat and can be just left in the hitch receiver.

    That's what I got with the Yak product that hangs up to three bikes by their wheels.

    It's not too bad - had to work out my own scheme for stabilizing the bikes though. It folds down too
    - for when you want to open the tailgate. I've taken it windsurfing a few times (plenty tailgate use
    there - changing clothes, getting equipment off the roof...) and the PITA factor was acceptable.

    Personally, if I did it again I'd have to look at the Performance hitch-mount rack that lets you
    just set the wheels into a couple of basket-like things. It folds up too. Dunno if it also lays down
    to let the tailgate open.

    To me, one redeeming feature of the Yak is that it carries the bike up high enough so you don't have
    a $2,000 bumper guard back there....dunno about the Performance product in that regard.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  13. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 07:42:47 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now.
    >
    > You could put a fork mount on a 2x6, knock 1/2 the rear seat down, and stand the bike up inside. A
    > second rubber mat can protect the back of the folded seat from mud.
    >
    > OTOH, the more expensive hitch mount racks, like the better Yakima, Sportworks, or Hollywoods,
    > fold up when not in use. Some fold down when the bike is on, allowing access to the rear gate.
    > Some even accept ski mounts, etc... for other seasons. Be prepared to spend $200-250 or so for a
    > really good model.
    >
    > I prefer roof racks, but large SUV's are a bear to load. I rule out roof racks on anything I can't
    > load from the ground, because along with being a PITA to load, clearance problems often result.
    >
    > I had a company-provided Yukon for a while, and I was very disappointed in the "utility" of the
    > vehicle. While it was truly a king of towing, a nice interior and all the easily scratched plastic
    > inside left me under whelmed for a $35-40k vehicle. Great for transporting a few folks in luxury,
    > but the "sport" aspect was also lost on me.
    >
    > Barry

    Cargo hold mount I built for my jeep... scrap of plywood that was just big enough, some sawing,
    two mounts from performance ($20 for the pair), and some very cheap hardware to attach the mounts
    to the wood.

    http://www.pbase.com/image/19404790

    Jon Bond
     
  14. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "bike" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a 2002 Tahoe and I ride 3 or 4 times a week. I have been taking off the front-wheel and
    > putting the bike in the rear cargo area but this is starting to scratch up the interior and it
    > gets my car muddy.
    >
    > I only have to carry 1 bike and I have a 2 inch hitch. Is a hitch rack the way to go?
    <snip>

    "Oh goodness! My big arse rugged manly 4WD recreational/utility vehicle with the large cargo area is
    getting dirty! What should I do?!" Why did you buy it? For the groceries I guess... <much rolling of
    eyes> I must admit that over the years I've had a lot of guys like you in vehicles like yours piss
    me off so I am completely biased.

    But seriously, if the bike is worth anything, you're stupid to leave it in the vehicle. You'll
    likely end up with missing bike AND a smashed window one day. And if you want cheap and easy, get a
    towbar rack. You'll be hard pressed to get better value if nothingelse. A basic towbar/hitch rack
    costs about $25 or less and is attached and removed from the towball/hitch with a (supplied usually)
    hex key in about 30-40 seconds. You need another 20-30 seconds to throw and secure bike onto rack.
    It's what I do when I don't want to carry two muddy bikes with the wheels off in my tiny arse two
    door rice sportsmobile and have the back seat folded down.
    --
    Westie
     
  15. M&M

    M&M Guest

    BB <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 12:01:36 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:
    > > On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 07:42:47 -0400, bike <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now.
    > >
    > > You could put a fork mount on a 2x6, knock 1/2 the rear seat down, and stand the bike up inside.
    > > A second rubber mat can protect the back of the folded seat from mud.
    >
    > You can get the fork mounts from Performance for $10 each. I've known a few people that have used
    > these, mounted on a 2x6 or something like that. It seems pretty nice to be able to keep the bike
    > inside the vehicle from a security perspective, even if it is kind of a mess.

    I've been shopping around for a pickup truck and the sales woman at my local Dodge dealer showed
    me a very interesting feature in the bed of the Ram pickup . 2 plastic tabs that can be pryed off
    (near the back of the cab ) revealing locations where fork mounts can be attached . Also in the
    Ram Quad cab , you can lift the rear seats an 2 metal plates fold out so you can place your bike
    behind the front seats ( the rear doors open to 90 degrees ), which I thought to be a nice touch .
    Some of the engineers must be mountain bikers .

    M&M
     
  16. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "bike" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have the mat. It's the sides that get scratch up and it's looking pretty bad now. That is the
    > reason I bought the big-ass SUV but it's still to small for my bike.

    Ayup. If only prospective SUV buyers would actually evaluate the storage space in the back of
    those things. The 4WD mech takes up so much space, the floor is higher. Badly reducing interior
    storage space.

    Trade it in and get a minivan. Cheaper, better ride, better gas mileage, far more useful
    storage space.

    hehe...but it's not as *cool*, is it?

    Pete
     
  17. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "M&M" <[email protected]> wrote

    >
    > I've been shopping around for a pickup truck and the sales woman at my local Dodge dealer showed
    > me a very interesting feature in the bed of the Ram pickup . 2 plastic tabs that can be pryed
    > off (near the back of the cab ) revealing locations where fork mounts can be attached . Also in
    > the Ram Quad cab , you can lift the rear seats an 2 metal plates fold out so you can place your
    > bike behind the front seats ( the rear doors open to 90 degrees ), which I thought to be a nice
    > touch . Some of the engineers must be mountain bikers .
    >
    > M&M

    I was behind a newish Chevy S-10 extended cab pickup today. Evidently a bike shop truck. There was a
    Trek behind the seats. No quad cab needed.

    Me? I have a $0 2x4 rack in the bed of my (non extended cab) pickup. Having to remove the wheels to
    haul it in a pickup is a serious disconnect. Either it is a useless, tiny bed, or you have no
    imagination.

    Screw fork mounts in a pickup.

    Pete
     
  18. On Mon, 04 Aug 2003 03:28:44 GMT, "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Me? I have a $0 2x4 rack in the bed of my (non extended cab) pickup. Having to remove the wheels to
    >haul it in a pickup is a serious disconnect.

    When I had a truck, I didn't need ANY rack to haul my bike in the back. <G>

    Barry
     
  19. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 04 Aug 2003 03:28:44 GMT, "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Me? I have a $0 2x4 rack in the bed of my (non extended cab) pickup.
    Having
    > >to remove the wheels to haul it in a pickup is a serious disconnect.
    >
    > When I had a truck, I didn't need ANY rack to haul my bike in the back. <G>
    >
    > Barry

    4 bungie cords seem to work pretty well, even in a small bed like in the Baja (right Blaine?)

    Although for longer trips with more cargo, I'd prefer a few fork mounts - gives you more room for
    race bags in the bed.

    Jon Bond
     
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