need examples of constrained highways/bridges with bike lanes

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Daniel Lerch, Sep 3, 2003.

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  1. Daniel Lerch

    Daniel Lerch Guest

    Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.

    Please post your answers here or email them to me at [email protected] Thanks!

    Daniel Lerch Alta Plannning + Design www.altaplanning.com
     
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  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.
    >
    > Please post your answers here or email them to me at [email protected] Thanks!

    I'm not sure whether you're looking only for additions to already- existing structures, or whether
    newly constructed ones are also included, but the Jamestown-Verrazano (sp?) Bridge in RI had a
    railed-off sidewalk added at the design stages due to the demands of people who wanted to walk and
    bike over it.

    --

    "Where was the ka-boom? There was supposed to be an Earth-shattering ka- boom!"
    - Marvin The Martian
     
  3. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]_ids.net says...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.
    > >
    > > Please post your answers here or email them to me at [email protected] Thanks!
    >
    > I'm not sure whether you're looking only for additions to already- existing structures, or whether
    > newly constructed ones are also included, but the Jamestown-Verrazano (sp?) Bridge in RI had a
    > railed-off sidewalk added at the design stages due to the demands of people who wanted to walk and
    > bike over it.

    P.S.: Now if we could only get them to add one to the Newport bridge...

    --

    "Where was the ka-boom? There was supposed to be an Earth-shattering ka- boom!"
    - Marvin The Martian
     
  4. On Wed, 03 Sep 2003 12:01:42 +0000, Daniel Lerch wrote:

    > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.

    I wish I had a _good_ example. One that comes to mind is the bridge over the Schuylkill River
    connecting Betzwood Park to Valley Forge Park. It connects bike traffic from the Schuylkill River
    Trail to VF park, and runs alongside PA Rte 422 as it crosses the river. The bike lane/walkway
    consists of a wooden walkway with tall chain-link fences on either side separating the bikes from
    the cars, and from the long drop to the river. It is an awful bridge. Cars roar past -- especially
    nice when it's raining; the water comes at you like a fire hose. The bridge is too narrow to
    accomodate two-way traffic. Actually, riding is supposedly prohibited, but no one pays attention.
    There are boards missing, which is really disconcerting.

    Another is, of course, the Brooklyn Bridge. Riding across that is legal, which is unusual for
    bridges in the Eastern US. The pathway of course preceded the roadway, so perhaps they just never
    changed the law for that bridge. But the pathway is not all that wide, maybe 8-10 feet, and is
    divided in half. One half gets two-way pedestrian traffic, the other two-way bike traffic. On this
    bridge the path is elevated above the roadway, and runs over the space dividing the road into
    inbound and outbound lanes.

    There are parts of the Perkiomen Path, near Valley Forge, built alongside Rte 422, which are not too
    bad. There, it is a separate paved path separated from the roadway by about 10' of grass and a
    barrier rail.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a _`\(,_ | conclusion. --
    George Bernard Shaw (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Duffy Pratt

    Duffy Pratt Guest

    On Long Island they added a bike path alongside one of the limited access parkways to Jones Beach
    a while ago. I think it was added to the Meadowbrook Parkway, but the space limitations are not
    that severe.

    The George Washington Bridge has a footpath/bikepath.

    Every time I have ridden on "bikepaths", they have been jammed with rollerbladers, skateboards, baby
    carriages, and in general seem much more dangerous than just riding in traffic.

    Duffy

    "Daniel Lerch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.
    >
    > Please post your answers here or email them to me at [email protected] Thanks!
    >
    > Daniel Lerch Alta Plannning + Design www.altaplanning.com
     
  6. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    The Washington bridge in East Providence, RI has some sort of walkway or path, I've seen people
    walking and cycling on it. It looks narrow. I have never tried to find it, though, so I have not
    experienced it myself.

    I know I've seen something similar on other bridges here in RI. Possibly the Jamestown Verrazzano
    bridge or the Newport Pell bridge...I really don't remember.

    On 3 Sep 2003 12:01:42 -0700, Daniel Lerch <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.
    >
    > Please post your answers here or email them to me at [email protected] Thanks!
    >
    > Daniel Lerch Alta Plannning + Design www.altaplanning.com
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  7. Baltobernie

    Baltobernie Guest

    The new twelve lane Woodrow Wilson Bridge on the Washington Beltway will have bike lanes.
    http://www.wilsonbridge.com/po-projectdescription2.html

    Bernie

    > "Daniel Lerch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.
    > >
    > > Please post your answers here or email them to me at [email protected] Thanks!
    > >
    > > Daniel Lerch Alta Plannning + Design www.altaplanning.com
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 15:17:53 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    > but the Jamestown-Verrazano (sp?) Bridge in RI had a railed-off sidewalk added at the design
    > stages due to the demands of people who wanted to walk and bike over it.

    Is it any good for cycling? I'd like to ride to Jamestown sometime. Where does one access it, and
    how does one get there?

    I'll look at a map now...

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  9. Rick Onanian wrote:
    > On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 15:17:53 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >
    >> but the Jamestown-Verrazano (sp?) Bridge in RI had a railed-off sidewalk added at the design
    >> stages due to the demands of people who wanted to walk and bike over it.
    >
    >
    > Is it any good for cycling? I'd like to ride to Jamestown sometime. Where does one access it, and
    > how does one get there?
    >
    > I'll look at a map now...
    >

    I would find that ride more than a little frightening. Getting on 138 from 1A wouldn't be too bad, I
    suppose, and the approach is all downhill (and at least it's not a metal grid like the old bridge).
    Still, the road is full of idiot drivers from CT trying to get to the Cape in a hurry.

    No thanks. I think a saner idea would be to drive your bike across the bridge.

    Scott, former Wickford resident
     
  10. The Ferry St. Bridge in Eugene, Oregon was originally built with narrow walkways outside the arches,
    that were separated from motor traffic. However, the 4-foot widths were inadequate for both
    pedestrian and bike traffic. So, in recent years, new supports were built, angling out from the
    bridge structure, to permit 8-foot wide walkways to be built. There is one-way bike travel on each
    side, but it's two-way for pedestrians. It's worked out very well and there's little conflict with
    the various types of users. This project has allowed full and safe use of the bridge for bike
    riders, walkers and runners, which number in the thousands each day. This added support system would
    be a good model for designing hanging walkways/bikeways to go on the sides of existing bridges that
    were built with no provision for them.

    Steve McDonald
     
  11. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 15:17:53 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    > > but the Jamestown-Verrazano (sp?) Bridge in RI had a railed-off sidewalk added at the design
    > > stages due to the demands of people who wanted to walk and bike over it.
    >
    > Is it any good for cycling? I'd like to ride to Jamestown sometime. Where does one access it, and
    > how does one get there?
    >
    > I'll look at a map now...

    Unfortunately, they haven't finished the approaches to the sidewalk yet (though it's in the DOT
    budget for the next couple of years), so it requires a bit of cross-country walking for a few yards
    or climbing over the guardrail.

    If you're comfortable on the high speed road, you could just take the on-ramp toward Newport and
    then lift the bike over the guard rail when you get to the beginning of the sidewalk on the south
    side of the bridge at the bottom of the hill. Otherwise you get to it from some dead-end street near
    the Saunderstown Yacht Club. I don't know the street name, but if you go down the first street south
    of the DB Mart on Boston Neck Rd. you should be able to find it by hanging to the left when you get
    near the water. Then just walk the bike through a few yards of weeds (or ride if you have a MTB) to
    the beginning of the walkway.

    There is also a sidewalk on the north side of the bridge which appears to be easier to get to from
    the NK side, but essentially dead-ends on the Jamestown side. Probably not a problem if you're
    walking, but I haven't a clue what to do with a bike.

    On the Jamestown end, there's an exit right at the end of the bridge, so just lift the bike over the
    rail and ride into Jamestown.

    I've never been on the bridge's sidewalk, but I've seen people and bikes on it. If it was a
    low-traffic time like a Saturday morning, I'd probably just ride in the regular traffic lane over
    the bridge rather than messing with the sidewalk. I wouldn't do that during a weekday rush hour,
    though; the traffic moves 60+ over the bridge during the morning and evening rush hours and the
    shoulder looks like it's only about 18" wide.

    Rick - If you want, e-mail me direct and I'll go into what little more detail I know (watch the spam
    blocks on the e-mail address).

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  12. Cjlink

    Cjlink Guest

    There is a nice separated bike path on the toll bridge (called the Torras Causway I believe) from
    Brunswick, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.
     
  13. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Daniel Lerch" wrote
    > Hi folks, Our firm, Alta Planning + Design, is looking for examples of bike lanes or paths on
    > constrained highways or long bridges. We're researching how bike lanes/paths have been added to
    > limited-access roads in situations where there is very little room to work with.
    >

    Salzburg, Austria, has at least one bridge with a bike path suspended underneath the roadway (with
    fencing to keep cyclists from falling off...). Very cool design, keeps cyclists completely out of
    the way of traffic noise, fumes, etc., and cyclists don't have to climb all the way to the level of
    the car lanes before starting across.
    --
    mark
     
  14. H. M. Leary

    H. M. Leary Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 15:17:53 -0400, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    > > but the Jamestown-Verrazano (sp?) Bridge in RI had a railed-off sidewalk added at the design
    > > stages due to the demands of people who wanted to walk and bike over it.
    >
    > Is it any good for cycling? I'd like to ride to Jamestown sometime. Where does one access it, and
    > how does one get there?
    >
    > I'll look at a map now...

    I have only done this on a Sunday morning in the summertime. We rode in the traffic lane.

    The ride to Saunderstown over the old ( 1938 ) bridge was was allways a challenge especially with
    that grate!

    I miss the ferries to Newport. Remember the Governor Carr??

    HAND

    --
    ³Freedom Is a Light for Which Many Have Died in Darkness³

    - Tomb of the unknown - American Revolution
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 04 Sep 2003 13:32:26 GMT, H. M. Leary <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The ride to Saunderstown over the old ( 1938 ) bridge was was allways a challenge especially with
    > that grate!
    >
    > I miss the ferries to Newport. Remember the Governor Carr??

    Nope...I'm 23, and barely remember the grated bridge, which I thought was the one of the coolest
    things I've ever seen.

    > HAND
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  16. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Thu, 04 Sep 2003 13:32:26 GMT, H. M. Leary <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > The ride to Saunderstown over the old ( 1938 ) bridge was was allways a challenge especially
    > > with that grate!
    > >
    > > I miss the ferries to Newport. Remember the Governor Carr??
    >
    > Nope...I'm 23, and barely remember the grated bridge, which I thought was the one of the coolest
    > things I've ever seen.

    You wouldn't if you had to drive across it on a summer Friday afternoon; it would be evening by the
    time you got across it! I wasn't living in RI when the ferries were running, but I remember well the
    old bridge.

    > > HAND
    >

    --

    "Where was the ka-boom? There was supposed to be an Earth-shattering ka- boom!"
    - Marvin The Martian
     
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