Need help/advice converting SS MTB to English 3-Speed



T

Ted

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (Lobo Tommy) wrote:

> [email protected] (Jeff Wills) wrote in message
> news:<[email protected]>...
> > [email protected] (Lobo Tommy) wrote in message
> > news:<[email protected]>...
> > >
> > >
> > > I just sent the seller an e-mail. I'm still interested in strictly a
> > > 3-speed SA set up but this has my interest peaked! I wonder if he had
> > > some wider drop outs brazed on? Hmm....

> >
> > I'll bet you a dollar (Canadian) that no welding or brazing work has
> > been done on that machine. For all the stount construction of the
> > Monocog, it's still easier to widen the dropouts than it is to cut out
> > the old and weld in the new.
> >
> > Jeff

>
> But how are they widened? If you are using a machine to do it while
> you insert the hub, what happens when you get a flat on the trail
> where you need to take the wheel off? I just picture it in my head of
> the Monocog practically spitting it out with no way to get it back in
> manually.. :)


The dropout spacing can be permanently widened by bending the dropouts
and stays, followed by more bending to leave the dropouts parallel. The
parallelism is important, as non-parallel dropouts will likely result in
bent or broken axles.

Depending on the frame construction, these operations can require a fair
amount of force. Savvy shops refer to this as "cold setting" and will
often do the deed out of sight of squeamish owners.
 
J

Jeff Wills

Guest
[email protected] (Andrew Webster) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (Jeff Wills) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> <cut>
> >
> > "Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I
> > shall move the world." -- Archimedes
> >
> > Jeff

>
> Although this is much quoted, I believe

Blah, blah, blah
>
> *apologies to those without a symbol font that will render the above
> into the appropriate alphabet.
>

Yack, yack, yack
>
> Andrew Webster


Y'know, you sucked all the fun out of a perfectly good comment. OK,
fine- I don't know if that's an accurate quote from Archimedes (mostly
'cause I don't speak Greek), but at least accept it in the spirit in
which it was offered.

In other words, KISS MY ELBOW! :cool:

Jeff
 
D

Dave Reckoning

Guest
"Lobo Tommy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> maxo <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:<[email protected]>...
>> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 17:03:02 -0800, Lobo Tommy wrote:
>>
>> > I have a Redline Monocog Single Speed mountain bike

>>
>> and so does this guy, now with a Nexus 8-speed:
>> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=7295&item=7114850885&rd=1
>>
>> apparently it can be done--perhaps you can contact the seller and ask how
>> they did it?

>
>
> I just sent the seller an e-mail. I'm still interested in strictly a
> 3-speed SA set up but this has my interest peaked! I wonder if he had
> some wider drop outs brazed on? Hmm....


I would strongly reccomend that you consider the much lower efficency of the
Nexus system before you lay down the cash and build a wheel.

My direct expierence is that there is a tremendous difference in the
efficency between two systems. If you must use the Nexus be sure that you
are using the top end (stiffest gears) of it's range as it seems to loose a
lot of power in the lower ranges.

Just my observation but I ride several thousand miles a year on a SA three
speed hub. I recently tried to switch to Nexus to get more gears but could
not stand to go that slowly while peadling so hard.

BTW, If you want a nice Nexus 7 speed setup let me know, I have one hanging
from the rafters :)

Dave

<Change not to hot to reply>
 
J

Jeff Wills

Guest
[email protected] (Lobo Tommy) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (Jeff Wills) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> > [email protected] (Lobo Tommy) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> > >
> > >
> > > I just sent the seller an e-mail. I'm still interested in strictly a
> > > 3-speed SA set up but this has my interest peaked! I wonder if he had
> > > some wider drop outs brazed on? Hmm....

> >
> > I'll bet you a dollar (Canadian) that no welding or brazing work has
> > been done on that machine. For all the stount construction of the
> > Monocog, it's still easier to widen the dropouts than it is to cut out
> > the old and weld in the new.
> >
> > Jeff

>
> But how are they widened? If you are using a machine to do it while
> you insert the hub, what happens when you get a flat on the trail
> where you need to take the wheel off? I just picture it in my head of
> the Monocog practically spitting it out with no way to get it back in
> manually.. :)


1. Remove rear wheel and pedals.
2. Lay bike on its side on the floor.
3. Stand on the bottom dropout.
4. Pull upwards on the other dropout until the frame is permanently
widened to 135mm spacing.
5. Realign dropouts.

Jeff
 
S

Sheldon Brown

Guest
Lobo Tommy asked:

> But how are they widened? If you are using a machine to do it while
> you insert the hub, what happens when you get a flat on the trail
> where you need to take the wheel off? I just picture it in my head of
> the Monocog practically spitting it out with no way to get it back in
> manually.. :)


See: http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing

Sheldon "Leverage" Brown
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| If brute force doesn't work, you're not using enough! |
| --BOB Simon |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
http://harriscyclery.com
Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
 

Dan Burkhart

New Member
Nov 27, 2003
333
0
0
69
Sheldon Brown said:
Lobo Tommy asked:

> But how are they widened? If you are using a machine to do it while
> you insert the hub, what happens when you get a flat on the trail
> where you need to take the wheel off? I just picture it in my head of
> the Monocog practically spitting it out with no way to get it back in
> manually.. :)


See: http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing

Sheldon "Leverage" Brown
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| If brute force doesn't work, you're not using enough! |
| --BOB Simon |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
http://harriscyclery.com
Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com

For brute force to be effective, it must be combined with just the right amount of ignorance.
Dan
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 04:33:23 +0000, Dave Reckoning wrote:

> I would strongly reccomend that you consider the much lower efficency of
> the Nexus system before you lay down the cash and build a wheel.
>
> My direct expierence is that there is a tremendous difference in the
> efficency between two systems. If you must use the Nexus be sure that you
> are using the top end (stiffest gears) of it's range as it seems to loose
> a lot of power in the lower ranges.
>
> Just my observation but I ride several thousand miles a year on a SA three
> speed hub. I recently tried to switch to Nexus to get more gears but could
> not stand to go that slowly while peadling so hard.


It's in your head, man. :p Yeah, Nexus hubs have a little bit of drag and
they weigh a bit, but I've put tens of thousands of miles on one without
it getting to me, as have millions of European cyclists. Compared to wind
resistance, and tire squirm, it ain't that big a deal. I think it's more
psychological than anything, or perhaps you were just used to the gear
ratios with the SA. I'll concede that the complexity and seals of the
Nexus have more drag than the SA, but I own one of each, and eh, they both
do the trick in the city. ;)
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 15:33:36 -0800, Jeff Wills wrote:

> One master mechanic I knew took a twist out of a Cannondale
> (it was delivered that way) with a sturdy alignment table and a lot of
> leverage.


:-O

Now THAT would intimidate me!