Need Help Upgrading

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by number31, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. number31

    number31 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    After my gym membership ran out in december and watching many tour de france's I decided to take up cycling last month. The choice of bike was between a Giant OCR2, an Avanti Veloce and a bike made by the LBS but with similar parts to the Giant/Avanti. The "parts" bike from the LBS won out due to the fact it was $400 cheaper. Now after 500km of happy riding around Perth I'm looking at the upgrades.

    Here is the list of parts on my bike;

    Frame- Amiata
    Wheels- Shimano Alloy
    Tyres- Maxxis Detonator
    Gearset- Shimano Tiagra Flightdeck 9 Speed
    Brakes- Tektro
    Seatpost- Kalloy Carbon

    Any help with where to get parts and what to look for would be great

    Mark
     
    Tags:


  2. prhino

    prhino New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've got a similar question. I bought a Felt F75. The weak links as I see them are:

    Wheels: Shimano R500
    Cranks: FSA Gossamer, 3-PC Alloy with CNC 7075/T6 Alloy Chainrings, 50/34T
    Brakes: Dual Pivot Alloy with Cartridge Brake Pads

    What would I get the most bang-for-buck if I upgraded? I haven't picked it up yet, so I could potentially do a swap of some components and get a good price.
     
  3. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    0
    Why would they be weak links?

    I have a set of R500, while they may not be race wheels, they are robust wheels. If you want something lighter with more bling value, you might be looking at spending anywhere from $600 - $1000 for a set of wheels.

    Again I see no issues with your compact crankset. The recent edition of Ride magazine tested various cranksets, and I think the Ultegra cranks stood out in terms of stiffness and value for money.

    Brakes, if they are dual pivot, they will do the job. You might just consider changing the pads.

    At the end of the day, you should do some calculations. You might just be better off getting the next model or two models up to get the parts you want. Or simply purchase the frame, and build up the bike to your specifications.
     
  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    I agree with Thomas. Both bikes look good for their respective markets, one an entry level 9 speed, the other a mid market 10x2 with compact cranks.

    I recently built a bike, by comparison, the only "upgrade" I chose were the tyres, Conti GP4000.
     
  5. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just a note to say nothing wrong with wanting upgrades. I mean I want carbon everything, but does not mean that I need it.

    For me a worthwhile upgrade would be in the saddle area (Selle SMP Strike - never tried it, but it looks awsome). Till now, I have not really found a saddle that I am 100% comfortable with. I am currently using a Fizik Arione, but on some rides, and not all the time, I get numb in the nether region, and have to move around, or stand in the pedals.
     
  6. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,307
    Likes Received:
    0
    Both potential upgraders, here's my tuppence worth: every time you think about upgrading, put some money in the bank until the urge passes (try ING, good interest rates :) ). If you think about upgrading often enough, you'll soon have enough money to buy a better bike, which is, by far, the most economical way to upgrade.
    Alternatively, ride and ride and ride until you wear something out, then you'll get a chance to upgrade that bit.
    Seriously, you'll enjoy riding more when you learn to love your own bike and stop coveting upgrades too much. Both the bikes seem eminently ready for riding now.
     
  7. number31

    number31 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks guys, I had a look on probikekit.com and they only had 1 conti gp4000 tyre that fits my bike. Does anyone know how often they get new stock in? and also it says on my tyre 700 x 23C but the conti's are only 700 x 23. Does that matter?
     
  8. roshea

    roshea Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,308
    Likes Received:
    141
    Same thing.
     
  9. kleng

    kleng New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    482
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi

    You should also check out http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/
    I find them cheaper than probikekit. eg. Conti GP 4000 at ribble are only 18.68 gbp while at probike they are 22.75 gbp, shipping is about the same.

    Regards
    Ken



     
  10. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    0
    Would you mind giving us an example of the amount of postage charged, and the size of your order? I went to the website, and postage is charged based on weight of your order. So i gather its not a flat rate charge like probikekit.
     
  11. number31

    number31 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    thanks for the help guys. Went out and bought a pair of michelin pro race 2's and some michelin tubes from probikekit.com. Went out this morning on them and no problems what so ever. They ride 3-4kmph faster without noticing a change in effort. Now my problem is changing from the lower cog to the higher cog when it starts to rub. It takes a while to do and I lose alot of momentum especially up hills. Any advice?
     
  12. roshea

    roshea Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,308
    Likes Received:
    141
    Sounds like your gears need adjustment. Cables stretch and parts "wear in", so most shops have a free service (or more than one) after purchase. If the shop won't help you out for free, you have the option of paying someone to do the adjustment or learning yourself. There are plenty of internet resources about adjusting derailleurs etc - try http://www.parktool.com/repair/byregion.asp?catid=53&imageField2.x=12&imageField2.y=3 for a start.
     
  13. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    Mark, #31, where did you buy the bike?

    If they won't fix the shifting for free, bring it round here, any afternoon.
     
  14. cycleski

    cycleski New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mark do you have a compact crank fitted to your bike ie 50/34 chainrings?, have noticed that the change from 34 to 50 ring can be difficult and best shift occurs with cogs 3 to 4th from longest. Seems to be once the Fder gets its first click to stop the chain rub (trimming) the next move does not shift the cage as much as it would if the shift was made without trimming the cage, the double click move. Try shifting befor you run out of cogs and loose momentum, that sucks and best way to get dropped from a group for sure.
    Could just be some Fder cable adjustment required as suggested befor if the operation was good to start with.
     
  15. number31

    number31 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Bike was bought from The Bicycle Entrenpeneurs in Willeton. It was serviced a couple of weeks ago but the impression I got from a triathlon friend was thats what happens with road bikes. One problem I do have is I have only just started riding and I can't sustain the power on the top cog for more than 10kms. I am fine cruising at 32kmph but feel if the extra gear didnt make noises on the lower cog as I shifted up I could be doing 34-35kmph.
     
  16. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    Are the crankset and FD both Tiagra, and is it a 39/53 chainrings? Also, the chain length may be a little short. Try shifting up to the big ring at 14 or 13 or 12 on the rear casssette, no bigger.

    You are welcome to bring it over or ask your Tri mate who he uses, I can recomend Phil @ Runners world to have a look at it.
     
  17. cycleski

    cycleski New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    If I understand you correctly your suggesting the use of the small chainring and the smallest tooth rear cog in combination? this is not a good idea and will quickly wear your chain out, if you insist the cage can be adjusted not to rub, am assuming you know how to trim the front cage, first click. Extreme chain angles are not good for the long life of your transmission. Anticipating which chainring you will require well in advance then using the rear cogs to keep momentum is the way to go, avoiding the extreme angles will make shifts easier as well.
     
Loading...
Loading...