need help with some rear wheel axle



speed_demon

New Member
Jun 12, 2007
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Yea,i have a next bike and i checked the rear axle its bended,know any good websites for bike axles that i can check out please tell me.
 
speed_demon said:
Yea,i have a next bike and i checked the rear axle its bended,know any good websites for bike axles that i can check out please tell me.

If you are in the USA, then check Loose Screws (formerly known as The Third Hand). They are a good source of small bicycle parts. Most bicycle shops should also be able to help you get what you need.

http://www.loosescrews.com/index.cgi
 
speed_demon said:
Yea,i have a next bike and i checked the rear axle its bended,know any good websites for bike axles that i can check out please tell me.
You can replace the rear axle but you might as well buy 2 bacause it's just a question of time before the replacement gets bent too.

Ultimately, you need a better bike for the kind of hard riding that you do.
 
Niagara Cycle Works.

I have messed with those bikes a lot and have developed a system which led me to get some life out of them.

*Buy an axle kit to get the cones, dust caps, and locknuts. Remove and discard the axle. Your old cones will be pitted, I guarantee. If the axle bends, the cones will be misaligned.

*Buy a cromoly axle. If you can get a cromoly axle kit, then skip step 1, and tell me where you got it.

*Buy loose bearing balls.

*Throw out the caged balls and use loose bearing balls; you should then be able to put in two extra per side.

*Assemble the axle. Follow Jobst Brandt's instructions and tighten the cones until they have a bit of lumpy drag.

*Absolutely critical: While the new cones are breaking in, check the bearing clearance every ten miles or so and keep it plenty snug. If the clearance changes it is likely to do so at the very beginning before the shiny wear mark establishes itself in the cones. Maybe even go for a short "break in ride" when you put everything together, where the road is super smooth and tire pressure is a bit low. Reset the LH cone immediately after. Remember, with a solid axle bike you don't have to remove the freewheel and set the RH cone at all. Adjusting one cone will adjust the other.

The idea behind all this is that the axle can't bend unless the cones can move since the cones are tightly threaded to the axle. If the cones and bearing balls are screwed down tight against the hub cups, then they can't move.

You want to use more balls to keep the slight preload from fatiguing the bearing cups and cones. Eleven balls instead of nine will spread the load out.

Inexpensive cones often have a cheap finish and their clearance will change a lot in the first hundred miles. In '60s cycling books, there used to be a procedure for lapping new cones in place. You would assemble the hub too tight, with valve grinding compound in the place of grease, and rotate the axle with a drill. Then you would clean the abrasive compound out and install new balls.