Need Info on Heart Rate Monitor

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jay Chan, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. Jay Chan

    Jay Chan Guest

    I am planning to get a heart rate monitor for running outdoor. But I know very little about it, and
    whatever information that I know may have become obsoleted since the last time I used them.

    My questions are:

    - I assume that all of them require a sensor to be placed on my chest. Some of them can sense our
    heart rate through the handle bar in a trackmill. But I am running outdoor; therefore, that is
    not what I am asking for. Are there devices that don't require putting a sensor onto my chest?

    - I assume that all of them show the reading on wristwatch devices. I am wondering how the
    information being sent from the sensor to the wristwatch? Are they use radio frequency to
    transmit reading? They are all wireless, right?

    - Can you suggest any model that has these feature: o Wireless connection between the sensor and
    the wristwatch. o Has a time clock to see date and time. o Has a stop watch feature to show the
    time spent on running (no need to keep record on prior running). o Has a heart rate monitor that
    can warn me if my heart rate goes below or goes over a heart rate zone that I define.

    Thanks.

    Jay Chan
     
    Tags:


  2. Geez, what HRM doesn't have all these features? This is considered pretty much the basics. I have a
    Polar Coach which is a pretty basic model, and it has all this plus 28 subintervals that can be
    measured, and some other things I never learned how to use (too complicated). You can do intervals
    with timed recovery or recovery down to a certain heart rate, etc, but I always found the
    programming a PITA.

    Any good HRM would do all this, Larry

    Jay Chan <[email protected]> writes:
    : I am planning to get a heart rate monitor for running outdoor. But I know very little about it,
    : and whatever information that I know may have become obsoleted since the last time I used them.

    : My questions are:

    : - I assume that all of them require a sensor to be placed on my chest. Some of them can sense our
    : heart rate through the handle bar in a trackmill. But I am running outdoor; therefore, that is
    : not what I am asking for. Are there devices that don't require putting a sensor onto my chest?

    : - I assume that all of them show the reading on wristwatch devices. I am wondering how the
    : information being sent from the sensor to the wristwatch? Are they use radio frequency to
    : transmit reading? They are all wireless, right?

    : - Can you suggest any model that has these feature: o Wireless connection between the sensor and
    : the wristwatch. o Has a time clock to see date and time. o Has a stop watch feature to show the
    : time spent on running (no need to keep record on prior running). o Has a heart rate monitor
    : that can warn me if my heart rate goes below or goes over a heart rate zone that I define.

    : Thanks.

    : Jay Chan
     
  3. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On 20 Feb 2004 09:33:07 -0800, [email protected] (Jay Chan) wrote:

    >I am planning to get a heart rate monitor for running outdoor. But I know very little about it, and
    >whatever information that I know may have become obsoleted since the last time I used them.
    >
    >My questions are:
    >
    >- I assume that all of them require a sensor to be placed on my chest. Some of them can sense our
    > heart rate through the handle bar in a trackmill. But I am running outdoor; therefore, that is
    > not what I am asking for. Are there devices that don't require putting a sensor onto my chest?
    >
    >- I assume that all of them show the reading on wristwatch devices. I am wondering how the
    > information being sent from the sensor to the wristwatch? Are they use radio frequency to
    > transmit reading? They are all wireless, right?
    >
    >- Can you suggest any model that has these feature: o Wireless connection between the sensor and
    > the wristwatch. o Has a time clock to see date and time. o Has a stop watch feature to show the
    > time spent on running (no need to keep record on prior running). o Has a heart rate monitor that
    > can warn me if my heart rate goes below or goes over a heart rate zone that I define.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >Jay Chan

    Check out Polar's sight they have a comparison chart of features that you'll probably find
    helpful. Polar alone has on the order of 20-40 different HR monitors.

    http://www.polarusa.com/

    ~Matt
     
  4. Steve Hansen

    Steve Hansen Guest

    Jay Chan wrote:

    > Are there devices that don't require putting a sensor onto my chest?
    Yes, but... the others either have a tight wrist strap, or require you to touch the watch with two
    fingers of the other hand. A tight wrist strap, to me, is less comfortable than a chest strap.
    Touching your wrist with the other hand makes you unable to swing your arms, and throws your stride
    off. Personally, I prefer the chest strap...

    > - I assume that all of them show the reading on wristwatch devices. I am wondering how the
    > information being sent from the sensor to the wristwatch? Are they use radio frequency to
    > transmit reading? They are all wireless, right?
    Right. They use radio. Some low-end models are subject to interference if you run with a group.
    (Your watch might receive from the wrong sensor.) The models that have "coded" sensors avoid that
    problem, by some technical magic.

    > - Can you suggest any model that has these feature: o Wireless connection between the sensor and
    > the wristwatch. o Has a time clock to see date and time. o Has a stop watch feature to show the
    > time spent on running (no need to keep record on prior running). o Has a heart rate monitor
    > that can warn me if my heart rate goes below or goes over a heart rate zone that I define.

    A Polar 210 has those, and more. I like that the HR zone alarm makes a beeping sound, so I don't
    have to look at it. It tells me when to slow down a little. Another feature that I like is that the
    HR, stopwatch, and time are all on one screen. When running, the HR and SW are big and easy to read,
    but the time-of-day is smaller. When not running, the time-of-day is big. You can use it for a
    watch, if you want. Higher models (more cost) also have more features, such as computer interface.

    Lower models have fewer features. I tried the Polar S5, first, because of it's lower price. The S5
    has your feature list. But it only displays one thing at a time (HR or SW, but not both on one
    screen.) And, the HR zone alarms (over/under) don't make any sound, so you have to keep looking at
    it. I didn't like it.

    Steve
     
  5. Jay Chan

    Jay Chan Guest

    > > Are there devices that don't require putting a sensor
    > > onto my chest?
    > Yes, but... the others either have a tight wrist strap, or require you to touch the watch with two
    > fingers of the other hand. A tight wrist strap, to me, is less comfortable than a chest strap.
    > Touching your wrist with the other hand makes you unable to swing your arms, and throws your
    > stride off. Personally, I prefer the chest strap...

    Thanks for the summary of the alternatives available. I need to take a good look on the wrist strap
    version to see if it is practical to me. I tried the chest-strap version before many years ago, and
    I didn't like it.

    I agree with you that asking me to use two finger to touch the watch in another arm just to check
    the heart rate doesn't sound very appealing to me. I would much rather to use a chest-strap version
    if I had to choose between that and the chest-strap version.

    > Right. They use radio. Some low-end models are subject to interference if you run with a group.
    > (Your watch might receive from the wrong sensor.) The models that have "coded" sensors avoid that
    > problem, by some technical magic.

    Good. I run alone early in the morning when no one is around. I don't think interference will be a
    problem to me.

    > A Polar 210 has those, and more. I like that the HR zone alarm makes a beeping sound, so I don't
    > have to look at it. It tells me when to slow down a little. Another feature that I like is that
    > the HR, stopwatch, and time are all on one screen. When running, the HR and SW are big and easy to
    > read, but the time-of-day is smaller. When not running, the time-of-day is big. You can use it for
    > a watch, if you want. Higher models (more cost) also have more features, such as computer
    > interface.
    >
    > Lower models have fewer features. I tried the Polar S5, first, because of it's lower price. The S5
    > has your feature list. But it only displays one thing at a time (HR or SW, but not both on one
    > screen.) And, the HR zone alarms (over/under) don't make any sound, so you have to keep looking at
    > it. I didn't like it.

    Thanks for pointing out the audio beep feature. This feature makes a lot of sense to me. I will
    defintely ask for it. And I will put Polar 210 in my short list.

    Jay Chan
     
  6. Jay Chan

    Jay Chan Guest

    > Any good HRM would do all this,

    Thanks for the good news. My experience with heart rate monitor is something like 4 to 5 years old.
    Since then, I haven't kept track with its development. Glad to hear that a decent heart rate monitor
    will do all these and some.

    Jay Chan
     
  7. Jay Chan

    Jay Chan Guest

    > Check out Polar's sight they have a comparison chart of features that you'll probably find
    > helpful. Polar alone has on the order of 20-40 different HR monitors.
    >
    > http://www.polarusa.com/

    Thanks for the link. I will go there to compare the models.
     
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