Need Lunch ideas



J

JC Der Koenig

Guest
"Doug Freyburger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> JC Der Koenig wrote:
>>
>> Not eating when you're not hungry is dumb?

>
> "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". Eating
> while you're not hungry, and using the food to prevent
> hunger in the first place, is that ounce of prevention.
>
> Caveat - Easy to abuse and do a pound and a half of
> prevention as your pound of cure.
>


Also, there are many that will do your pound and a half cure several times a
day. Perhaps most would be better off developing a more natural
relationship with hunger.
 
J

JC Der Koenig

Guest
I believe that's the first time I've used the term "scintillating prose" in
any post within this newsgroup.

Is it possible that you could be wrong? Again?

--
You take stupid to a new level. -- MFW


"Joe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:z%[email protected]
> Psst! another rerun, you are repeating again. Did you get to the end of
> your one-liners and have to start over ?
>
> - Bread is not low carb
> - Pancakes are not low carb.
> - Cookies are not low carb, fatboy.
> - Ice cream is how you got fat in the first place.
> - Grits are not low carb.
> - Have you ever heard of proper punctuation?
> - Common sense dictates that you're an idiot.
> - Learn how to quote properly, idiot.
> - obesity = idiocy
>
> And who can forget (my personal favorite)
> - Your inane ramblings are more nonsensical than ever.
>
> Butch up big guy
>
>
>
> "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Now that's truly scintillating prose, when you consider it's coming from
>> an obese idiot.
>>
>> Good job, fatboy.

>
>
 
J

JC Der Koenig

Guest
You meant that it doesn't work for you.

But then again, nothing does.

--
You take stupid to a new level. -- MFW


<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "There is actually nothing wrong with the advice that was given. Eating
>
> good tasting or exciting foods all the time may cause a person to over
> eat.
> I doubt that the average person would gain a lot of weight if they ate
> boring, repetitive, bland foods.
> Many people complain that low carb menus are boring. IMO, they are
> overlooking a great tool to help them control their weight. "
>
>
> There is nothing wrong with it except that it doesn't work.
 
T

Tom G

Guest
"Zoe" <don'[email protected]'tspam.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> >
> > "Joe" < wrote in message

>
> >
> > There is actually nothing wrong with the advice that was given. Eating
> > good tasting or exciting foods all the time may cause a person to over
> > eat.
> > I doubt that the average person would gain a lot of weight if they ate
> > boring, repetitive, bland foods.
> > Many people complain that low carb menus are boring. IMO, they are
> > overlooking a great tool to help them control their weight.
> >

> I don't find low carb boring,


Good. If you are content with the menu, you are more likely to succeed on
a life long maintenance plan.

> actually it can be the opposite if you use
> different spices and such but it is easy to fall into a repetative trap.


Sure it can be somewhat mundane. I don't think that is a bad thing. Take
for example my eating habits in the past. Sometimes I would scour the fridge
and cupboards for something to munch on, thinking I was hungry. Often, the
snack I picked was junk food.
Now if I'm hungry, I'll look for my supper left overs, or grab a boiled
egg. Many times I would just look at the surplus supper and decide that I
really don't feel like any more of the same, or eggs. It helps to make me
realize that I'm not really hungry at all. Just looking for something to do
or munch on. If that is the case I'll chew some gum, or make some tea.
I'm quite happy with whatever I eat, and it tastes good. But most of the
things I choose to eat now don't cause me to over eat, because they don't
taste great. It only tastes great if I'm hungry. If the food tasted even
better than it does already, I know I would be munching on more of it later.
Basically I like my food, I don't love it. For some reason many people think
this is wrong.

> In the summer we grow the most delicious tomatoes. I look forward to

them
> every year. I eat them with every meal, prepared a million different ways.


> However by the end of the season, if I see one more tomato, I will throw

up.
> A few months later I forget all about it and start to look forward to

tomato
> season.


I know what you mean. They're good when they're here, but when it's over
that's not a bad thing either.

>
>
>
>
 
"Sure it can be somewhat mundane. I don't think that is a bad thing.
Take
for example my eating habits in the past. Sometimes I would scour the
fridge
and cupboards for something to munch on, thinking I was hungry. Often,
the
snack I picked was junk food. "

So obviously you think typical junk food is tasty and exciting. I
think most people would agree that people typically are scouring the
cupboards for junk food because they are hungry and have cravings.
Once you switch to low carb, you can eat healthy, tasty and exciting
real food without feeling hungry all the time and having these
cravings. Being able to eat real and tasty food is one reason low carb
works. Limiting yourself to a list of mundane foods will fail for most
people, because they will conclude it's too boring. The classic
example is the well known diets that try to restrict fat and calories.
A diet of celery, carrots, lettuce, low fat cottage cheese and the
like certainly qualifies as boring. Yet most on it fail, because they
are hungry all the time, get totally fed up with the boring food, and
just give up.


Keeping carbs low greatly diminishes your appetite, so the desire to
scour the cabinets for junk food disappears. Instead you know you can
eat a wide variety of good, and yes, tasty, low carb foods!
 
T

Tom G

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Sure it can be somewhat mundane. I don't think that is a bad thing.
> Take
> for example my eating habits in the past. Sometimes I would scour the
> fridge
> and cupboards for something to munch on, thinking I was hungry. Often,
> the
> snack I picked was junk food. "
>
> So obviously you think typical junk food is tasty and exciting.


I can't deny what made me fat in the first place. Of course they are
tasty and exciting. They're designed that way, and that is why I don't eat
them now.


> I think most people would agree that people typically are scouring the
> cupboards for junk food because they are hungry and have cravings.


And you are trying to say that the glucose swings that cause hunger and
cravings is the only reason? Of course it is one of the reasons, but not the
only one. Taste plays a big factor. Food companies spend a lot of money on
trying to find the right "taste". People have an expectation when they hear
Atkins talking about how wonderful low carb food is. For many, it just
doesn't measure up to what they were eating before. Part of the blame could
be that they are not very good cooks, and depended a lot on packaged foods
that are pre-spiced. It wouldn't take long to get bored. It also takes time
to cook your own meals, which would be a hindrance to those short on time
and need something quick.


> Once you switch to low carb, you can eat healthy, tasty and exciting
> real food without feeling hungry all the time and having these
> cravings. Being able to eat real and tasty food is one reason low carb
> works. Limiting yourself to a list of mundane foods will fail for most
> people, because they will conclude it's too boring. The classic
> example is the well known diets that try to restrict fat and calories.
> A diet of celery, carrots, lettuce, low fat cottage cheese and the
> like certainly qualifies as boring. Yet most on it fail, because they
> are hungry all the time, get totally fed up with the boring food, and
> just give up.


I know what you are saying, and I don't disagree. Low carb foods are not
bad tasting foods. I do believe that the more someone has depended on
refined products, the longer it will take to get used to eating differently.
When a person has been eating a lot of sweet foods, they almost seem to be
dependant on it. If it were not true, then why all the recipes like
"chocolate omelets" with Da Vinci syrup and other such weird low carb combos
that shouldn't be? Is that the way a low carber is supposed to enhance the
flavor? By eating chemicals?

>
> Keeping carbs low greatly diminishes your appetite, so the desire to
> scour the cabinets for junk food disappears. Instead you know you can
> eat a wide variety of good, and yes, tasty, low carb foods!


This is not the first posting of a person that is having trouble keeping
the diet interesting. I don't know exactly what meals these people are
preparing. But if anyone is bored with the diet, they're either going to
have to spruce it up a little, or learn to deal with the new taste.
Otherwise they will seek something tastier, like carby foods.
>
 
F

FOB

Guest
They aren't bored with the diet, they are bored with their own cooking.

In news:[email protected],
Tom G <[email protected]> stated
| This is not the first posting of a person that is having trouble
| keeping the diet interesting. I don't know exactly what meals these
| people are preparing. But if anyone is bored with the diet, they're
| either going to have to spruce it up a little, or learn to deal with
| the new taste. Otherwise they will seek something tastier, like carby
| foods.
 
"When a person has been eating a lot of sweet foods, they almost seem
to be
dependant on it. If it were not true, then why all the recipes like
"chocolate omelets" with Da Vinci syrup and other such weird low carb
combos
that shouldn't be? Is that the way a low carber is supposed to enhance
the
flavor? By eating chemicals? "

Where are all these bizarre recipes? I've been in this newsgroup for
years and have yet to see a recipe for a chocolate omelet. Sure, many
of us like to replace sugar with Splenda, or use a Da Vinci syrup to
make a dessert so we can still have one, but I don't see anything wrong
with it, unless dessert becomes the centerpiece of your diet. There
may be an occasional person acting the way you claim, but it's the
exception, not the rule. Look at the recent threads here and I see
people discussing all kinds of tasty, healthy, food ideas, not
chocolate omelets.
 
T

Tom G

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "When a person has been eating a lot of sweet foods, they almost seem
> to be
> dependant on it. If it were not true, then why all the recipes like
> "chocolate omelets" with Da Vinci syrup and other such weird low carb
> combos
> that shouldn't be? Is that the way a low carber is supposed to enhance
> the
> flavor? By eating chemicals? "
>
> Where are all these bizarre recipes? I've been in this newsgroup for
> years and have yet to see a recipe for a chocolate omelet.


I know you are a long time poster and low carber. You've never seen this
one?

" mix half sour cream and half cream cheese with cocoa powder
and sweetener for a chocolate omelet (also using sweetener and cocoa
powder in the egg part)."

There are other variations. The reason I singled this type of recipe out
is because of the adding of a sweetener to eggs for a meal.

> Sure, many
> of us like to replace sugar with Splenda, or use a Da Vinci syrup to
> make a dessert so we can still have one, but I don't see anything wrong
> with it, unless dessert becomes the centerpiece of your diet.


The adding of sweeteners is a preference for many on this board.
Personally, I don't trust them and prefer to go without the sweet taste.


> There
> may be an occasional person acting the way you claim, but it's the
> exception, not the rule. Look at the recent threads here and I see
> people discussing all kinds of tasty, healthy, food ideas, not
> chocolate omelets.


There are quite a few recipes that use carb replacement. Whether it is a
sweetener, or a substitute for gravy mix, or breading. Is this the way that
a low carber is suppose to make their food more tasty and exciting? I
wouldn't call a person a poor cook for not wanting to use them. But what a
person ate before low carb would have had sauces or sweet desserts. To
suddenly go bland is a big step.
The people that use the carb replacements didn't change their diet all
that much. They're just using a different product that is low carb. Atkins
advocates getting rid of the sweet taste in foods on one hand, but also
encourages low carb replacements on the other. When someone is starting out
on this diet, it can me a little confusing.
The low carbers that don't use them and the ones that do constantly argue
about whether they should be used or not. I guess if a person finds their
food that mundane, then perhaps adding extra stuff is the ticket for them. I
don't like the fake sugar taste, and I don't trust how they are made. Part
of the problem of our modern foods is the chemicals and the refinement. It's
not to hard to see why a person would choose not to use the extra
questionable carb replacements in light of the food industry's track record.
Perhaps this is why some of us find our food a little bland and
repetitive, but it's a choice that I'm willing to live with for added health
benefits. And I really don't mind the blander taste, but it is less than
what I use to eat that made me fat.
>
 
"There are quite a few recipes that use carb replacement. Whether it is
a
sweetener, or a substitute for gravy mix, or breading. Is this the way
that
a low carber is suppose to make their food more tasty and exciting? "

In short, Yes. I don't have a problem with coming up with substitutes
like:

sweetner - Splenda, aspartame, sweetnlow, etc

substitute for gravy mix - pan drippings. seasoning and using xanathan
gum if needed, or you can even use moderate amounts of gravy mix, as
there is only a few grams of carb per 1/4 cup in many of them

breading - Somtimes I make fried calamari using one of the low carb
crumb subs or soy flour. For cheesecake crust, I replace the crust
with ground nuts.

"The people that use the carb replacements didn't change their diet all

that much. They're just using a different product that is low carb.
Atkins
advocates getting rid of the sweet taste in foods on one hand, but also

encourages low carb replacements on the other. When someone is starting
out
on this diet, it can me a little confusing. "

I would stronly disagree. Using replacements like the above let's one
adjust carbs to their appropriate level, stay low carb snd still enjoy
most foods. The name of the game is finding low carb substitutes, not
going without. And it works, as I'm not fat.

"Perhaps this is why some of us find our food a little bland and
repetitive, but it's a choice that I'm willing to live with for added
health
benefits. And I really don't mind the blander taste, but it is less
than
what I use to eat that made me fat. "

That's fine as long as it works for you and you can live with it. But
I think for most people to give up things like sweetners and gravy
because they taste too good, will lead to quitting because they will
think LC is too restrictive and boring.
 
J

Joe the Aroma

Guest
"Tom G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> "Sure it can be somewhat mundane. I don't think that is a bad thing.
>> Take
>> for example my eating habits in the past. Sometimes I would scour the
>> fridge
>> and cupboards for something to munch on, thinking I was hungry. Often,
>> the
>> snack I picked was junk food. "
>>
>> So obviously you think typical junk food is tasty and exciting.

>
> I can't deny what made me fat in the first place. Of course they are
> tasty and exciting. They're designed that way, and that is why I don't eat
> them now.
>
>
>> I think most people would agree that people typically are scouring the
>> cupboards for junk food because they are hungry and have cravings.

>
> And you are trying to say that the glucose swings that cause hunger and
> cravings is the only reason? Of course it is one of the reasons, but not
> the
> only one. Taste plays a big factor. Food companies spend a lot of money on
> trying to find the right "taste". People have an expectation when they
> hear
> Atkins talking about how wonderful low carb food is. For many, it just
> doesn't measure up to what they were eating before. Part of the blame
> could
> be that they are not very good cooks, and depended a lot on packaged foods
> that are pre-spiced. It wouldn't take long to get bored. It also takes
> time
> to cook your own meals, which would be a hindrance to those short on time
> and need something quick.
>
>
>> Once you switch to low carb, you can eat healthy, tasty and exciting
>> real food without feeling hungry all the time and having these
>> cravings. Being able to eat real and tasty food is one reason low carb
>> works. Limiting yourself to a list of mundane foods will fail for most
>> people, because they will conclude it's too boring. The classic
>> example is the well known diets that try to restrict fat and calories.
>> A diet of celery, carrots, lettuce, low fat cottage cheese and the
>> like certainly qualifies as boring. Yet most on it fail, because they
>> are hungry all the time, get totally fed up with the boring food, and
>> just give up.

>
> I know what you are saying, and I don't disagree. Low carb foods are not
> bad tasting foods.


Nope. Low fat foods are bad tasting, low carb food are great. Occasionally
I'll get an urge for some carby food, and brocolli/cauliflower/asparagus
works well for that.
 
S

Sherry

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I would stronly disagree. Using replacements like the above let's one
> adjust carbs to their appropriate level, stay low carb snd still enjoy
> most foods. The name of the game is finding low carb substitutes, not
> going without. And it works, as I'm not fat.


Part of the enjoyment and challenge of creating low carb dishes is using
alternate foods to do what carby foods used to do. Substituting a low-carb
food for a carby one is what the whole idea is, right? We used to eat
mashed potatoes, now we eat mashed cauliflower; we used to eat spaghetti,
now we eat spaghetti squash; we used to eat corn meal on our fish, now we
use pecan meal. Even if we totally omit everything we used to eat from our
diets, we're still replacing everything with something.

I do know know that there are people who seem to feel that feeling deprived
is part of the whole "dieting" experience. I'm not one of them :). Getting
the great results we acheive - both weight-wise and health-wise - without
the idea that we have to suffer is one of the benefits that makes low carb
such a preferable WOE that so many of us can stick with for life. But
either way, whether one is of the mindset that we need to be deprived of
every former food, or of the mindset that we have so many great options and
still can lose and feel great, whether or not it works for that person is
really the name of the game...right?

--
Merry Christmas,
Sherry
364/297/195 (4/3/05)
http://lowcarb.owly.net
 
T

Tom G

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In short, Yes. I don't have a problem with coming up with substitutes
> like:
>
> sweetner - Splenda, aspartame, sweetnlow, etc
>
> substitute for gravy mix - pan drippings. seasoning and using xanathan
> gum if needed, or you can even use moderate amounts of gravy mix, as
> there is only a few grams of carb per 1/4 cup in many of them
>
> breading - Somtimes I make fried calamari using one of the low carb
> crumb subs or soy flour. For cheesecake crust, I replace the crust
> with ground nuts.


Well I don't eat cheese cake anymore, but if you and I are ever at the
same gathering, I'll take the bottom half and you can have the top. :eek:)

> When someone is starting out
> on this diet, it can me a little confusing. "


>
> I would stronly disagree. Using replacements like the above let's one
> adjust carbs to their appropriate level, stay low carb snd still enjoy
> most foods. The name of the game is finding low carb substitutes, not
> going without. And it works, as I'm not fat.


I just can't get past replacing one refined product for another.
Sometimes I can find a low carb substitute, like spaghetti squash. Most
other items can't be replaced without using something I don't want to eat.
I'm not fat anymore as well.

>
> "Perhaps this is why some of us find our food a little bland and
> repetitive, but it's a choice that I'm willing to live with for added
> health
> benefits. And I really don't mind the blander taste, but it is less
> than
> what I use to eat that made me fat. "
>
> That's fine as long as it works for you and you can live with it. But
> I think for most people to give up things like sweetners and gravy
> because they taste too good, will lead to quitting because they will
> think LC is too restrictive and boring.


Well, either way a person chooses, something is sacrificed. I really do
believe that food companies' best interest are in their own profits, rather
than people's health. On the other hand, they make products that some people
want and makes life easier.
I hope this conversation helps any new people reading to make proper
choices for themselves. I don't like to see anybody drop a good diet plan
because they are not happy with the selection of the food. It is a life long
endeavor and whatever plan or sub-plan they choose should be workable for
the long term.
I think it is fair to say that different folks have all sorts of reasons
for selecting low carb and for doing it a certain way. As long as something
is working to help achieve their goal, some flexibility can be enjoyed. I
can respect anyone's decision if they have researched and thought everything
through so they are not thwarting their own objectives. Something that I
think is beneficial to me, may not be the right way for all.

>