Need Pork Chop Ideas....

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sheryl Rosen, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. Sheryl  Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    Please help!
    I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to make
    over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if they are
    boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb to me).

    I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions, apples
    and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut, so
    that's out.

    I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.

    Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    accompaniments?

    Thanks!

    Sheryl
     
    Tags:


  2. "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    > accompaniments?


    You can make breaded and fried pork cutlets.

    You can mix seasonings with flour, dredge in the mix, brown and finish in
    the oven. Then deglaze the pan to make a sauce.

    You can make a pork piccata if you can slice them a little thinner. There is
    a recipe for piccata on my web page.

    Money saving hint: The boneless pork sold as chops can sell for $5,50 a
    pound. On sale you can buy a whole boneless loin for $1.89/lb. Cut it into
    three or four pieces, freeze, then you can make a small roast or slice it
    for chops to any thickness you want for a particular recipe.

    --
    Ed
    http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/
     
  3. On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:01:16 -0500, Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    >accompaniments?


    Crash and I agree that the only thing needed for good pork chops is salt
    and pepper.

    That being said, I have an alternative way of preparing them. I brown them
    in a skillet, and move them into a baking pan. Deglaze the skillet with a
    little water. Mix the water with a can of Campbell's Cream of Onion soup.
    Pour the soup over the pork, cover with foil, and bake for about an hour at
    325F.

    The meat will be extremely tender and flavorful, and the soup/drippings
    mixture forms a gravy that is great on mashed potatoes.

    Hope you have a nice dinner!
    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  4. "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message : Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to make
    > over the weekend..................


    This is my favourite pork chop recipe - I'm sure it'd be just as good
    without the bones.-
    Richard.

    Oven-Braised Pork Chops With Red Onions And Pears

    pork

    2 cups balsamic vinegar
    3 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
    6 garlic cloves, peeled
    4 center cut pork chops,; 1 1/4 inch thick
    1 large red onion; in 8 wedges
    1 salt
    1 freshly ground pepper
    2 ripe but firm pears,; cut in 8 wedges
    1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    2 tablespoon honey

    The sugar in the honey helps to caramelize the pork, onion and pears as
    they oven-braise. It is a technique that works well with other roasted
    meats and birds as well. Just mix a little honey with the pan juices and
    baste or brush the roast with that during the last 10 minutes or so of
    roasting.

    For some dishes, you want the onions cut fine, so they almost disappear.
    Here, I cut the onions large-and the pears, too-so they keep their shape
    and don't fall apart. Even when ripe, Bosc pears stay firmer than most,
    making them just right for this dish.

    In a small saucepan, bring the balsamic vinegar to a boil over high heat.
    Adjust the heat to a gentle boil and boil until the vinegar is syrupy and
    reduced to about 1/3 cup. Set aside.

    Preheat oven to 425° F. Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet with a
    flameproof handle over medium-high heat. Whack the garlic cloves with the
    flat side of a knife and scatter them over the oil. Cook, shaking the
    skillet, until brown, about 2 minutes. Lay the pork chops in and cook
    until the underside is browned, about 6 minutes. Remove and reserve the
    garlic cloves if they become more than deep golden brown before the chops
    are fully browned. Turn the chops, tuck the onion wedges into the pan and
    continue cooking until the second side of the chops is browned, about 6
    minutes. Season with salt and pepper. About half way through browning the
    second side, tuck the pear wedges in between the chops.

    Stir the red wine vinegar and honey together in a small bowl, until the
    honey is dissolved. Pour the vinegar/honey mixture into the skillet and
    bring to a vigorous boil. Return the garlic cloves to the skillet if you
    have removed them. Place the skillet in the oven and roast until the
    onions and pears are tender and the juices from the pork are a rich,
    syrupy dark brown, about 30 minutes. Once or twice during roasting, turn
    the chops and redistribute the onions and pears. Handle the skillet
    carefully-it will be extremely hot.

    Remove the skillet from the oven. Place a chop in the center of each
    warmed serving plate. Check the seasoning of the onion-pear mixture,
    adding salt and pepper if necessary. Spoon the pears, onion and pan juices
    around the chops. Drizzle the balsamic vinegar reduction around the edge
    of the plate.

    Contributor: Lydia's Kitchen

    Yield: 4 servings

    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000
    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000,N0^00000
    NYC Nutrilink: N0^00000,N0^00000

    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.66 **

    BE318A2C.60B47%[email protected]
    > (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if they are
    > boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb to
    > me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    > apples
    > and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut, so
    > that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    > accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl
    >
     
  5. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:BE318A2C.60B47%[email protected]:

    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to
    > make over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone,
    > if they are boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just
    > sounds dumb to me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    > apples and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,
    > so that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but
    > damned if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all
    > along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork
    > chops, and accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl
    >


    Use them with cabbage or kraut in a casserole.
    Bite-size them in a sweet & sour pork stir-fry.




    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  6. sf

    sf Guest

    On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:01:16 -0500, Sheryl Rosen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to make
    > over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if they are
    > boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb to me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions, apples
    > and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut, so
    > that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    > accompaniments?
    >

    do you like sherry and sour cream?

    sf
     
  7. sf

    sf Guest

    On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:09:40 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Crash and I agree that the only thing needed for good pork chops is salt
    > and pepper.


    What happened to garlic and thyme?

    sf
     
  8. On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:29:45 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:09:40 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Crash and I agree that the only thing needed for good pork chops is salt
    >> and pepper.

    >
    >What happened to garlic and thyme?


    They're for beef.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  9. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > What happened to garlic and thyme?


    They moved to detroit and started a Rock and Roll Band.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  10. On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 00:34:04 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:29:45 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:09:40 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Crash and I agree that the only thing needed for good pork chops is salt
    >>> and pepper.

    >>
    >>What happened to garlic and thyme?

    >
    >They're for beef.
    >
    >Carol


    OMG, they are so good on pork too. To die for!

    Christine
     
  11. "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BE318A2C.60B47%[email protected]
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to make
    > over the weekend.

    ...snip...
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    > accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl
    >


    This is dead simple and you can take it anywhere.

    Braised Pork Chops with Orange and Ginger

    For 4 servings
    Trim excess fat off four chops (or whatever) and brown on both sides with
    two teaspoons of toasted sesame oil in a non-stick pan. Add :

    - the juice and zest of two oranges,
    - a tablespoon of grated fresh ginger,
    - a good grind of fresh black pepper,
    - a cup of stock,
    - salt to taste.

    Simmer for 25 minutes covered, spooning the liquid over the chops now and
    then; then uncover and turn up the heat to reduce the liquid until it sticks
    to the chops. Serve with boiled rice and steamed vegetables.

    David
     
  12. On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 23:22:39 -0800, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 00:34:04 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:29:45 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:09:40 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    >>><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Crash and I agree that the only thing needed for good pork chops is salt
    >>>> and pepper.
    >>>
    >>>What happened to garlic and thyme?

    >>
    >>They're for beef.
    >>
    >>Carol

    >
    >OMG, they are so good on pork too. To die for!
    >
    >Christine


    I've used onions or onion powder (granulated onion, if you're particular
    about that kind of thing). Never occurred to me to use garlic or thyme.
    I'll see if Crash wants to try it and let you know.

    Sheryl, I just thought of something you might make for a side dish. It's a
    concoction that I developed for stuffing boneless pork loin roasts.

    Cubed or ground, dried bread
    Diced apples
    Apple juice to moisten the bread
    Chopped nuts of your choice (I use pecans)
    Seasonings of your choice (I don't recall what I use. It's probably
    different every time)

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  13. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to
    > make over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone,
    > if they are boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just
    > sounds dumb to me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    > apples and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,
    > so that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but
    > damned if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all
    > along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops,
    > and accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl


    You can do a pork parmesan stryle. Sounds weird, but it's good; like a
    cross between veal and chicken! LOL. Bread the pork MEDALLIONS (not
    steaks!) and fry in a pan. When it's done, place a strip of cheese on each
    medallion, top with your favorite hot spaghettii sauce, and then sprinkle
    some parmesan or mozzarella or whatever on top. I've never made this with
    pork, but I know others have and loved it. Can't be all bad!

    kili
     
  14. Jed

    Jed Guest

    On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:01:16 -0500, Sheryl Rosen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    >accompaniments?


    Last week I made my standard Chidcken Fried Steak, replacing the steak
    with a bone-in pork chop. Pan fried the pork chop in oil with some
    bacon drippings added, removed it from the pan and made a milk gravy
    with salt, pepper, garlic and onion powder. Served with standard-issue
    mashed potatoes. Not particularly health-wise but even better, IMO,
    than using a pounded/tenderized piece of round.

    I don't see why you couldn't use the bonless pork chops, but they will
    cook more quickly and dry out faster so would need more careful
    tending.
     
  15. try this... They come out very tender and taste excellent..


    San Francisco Pork Chops



    4 pork chops (boneless loin) ½ to ¾ inch thick

    1 tbs vegetable oil

    1 clove garlic minced



    Sauce

    2 tsp vegetable oil

    4 tbs dry sherry

    4 tbs soy sauce

    2 tbs brown sugar

    ¼ tsp crushed red pepper

    2 tsp cornstarch

    2 tsp water



    Trim the fat off the chops. Heat oil in a skillet and brown the chops on
    both sides. Remove the chops and add a little more oil if needed. Sauté the
    garlic for a minute being careful not to burn it.



    Sauce

    Combine oil, sherry, soy sauce, brown sugar and red pepper. Place the chops
    back in the skillet and pour the sauce over them. Cover tightly.

    Simmer over low heat until the chops are tender and cooked through, about
    30-35 minutes. Add a little water if needed to keep the sauce from cooking
    down too much.

    Turn the chops once.

    Remove the chops to a platter.

    In the skillet, stir in cornstarch which is dissolved in water. Cook until
    the sauce is thickened. Pour over the chops and serve.



    I serve it over buttered noodles.



    If you like it with a bigger bite, add more crushed red pepper.. (try it
    this way first)

    Enjoy


    --
    sharkman.

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to
    > make over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone,
    > if they are boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just
    > sounds dumb to me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    > apples and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,
    > so that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but
    > damned if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all
    > along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops,
    > and accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl
     
  16. On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 22:01:16 -0500, Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    >I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    >Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    >I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions, apples
    >and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    >The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut, so
    >that's out.
    >
    >I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    >if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.


    Would you consider brining them in a bitter orange brine with chipotle
    powder different from marinating them?

    --
    Siobhan Perricone
    Humans wrote the bible,
    God wrote the rocks
    -- Word of God by Kathy Mar
     
  17. Pizen

    Pizen Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to
    > make over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone,
    > if they are boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just
    > sounds dumb to me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    > apples and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,
    > so that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but
    > damned if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all
    > along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork
    > chops,
    > and accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl


    I guess it would depend on how thick they are, but why not a roast
    (it's easy and you can devote your time with your guests) using
    something just a bit different? As an example, how about roasting the
    pork chops with sweet potatoes, using cider, dijon mustard, onion,
    garlic, and herbs de provence? Or toss the cider and herbs and
    substitute Coca-Cola and Worcestshire and some ground cloves? Or as
    someone else posted, cutting them into strips for use in a stir-fry?
    With the appropriate veggies and some spice (Thai chili paste and a
    coupe of diced bird-eye chilis thrown in?), that could be great.

    Tired of the grill? C'mon! Spring's a-comin', and that means
    barbecue!

    --
    "Life is hard. Life is harder when
    you're stupid". - John Wayne

    "Politics is war without bloodshed while
    war is politics with bloodshed" - Mao Zedong

    '99 FLHRCI
     
  18. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to

    make
    > over the weekend.
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,

    apples
    > and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,

    so
    > that's out.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops,

    and accompaniments?

    Slice each through the center and with a mallet pound thin. Flour and
    egg wash and coat with bread crumbs blended with Italian seasoning,
    then fry quickly until *not* quite fully cooked through. Layer in
    ovenware with tomato sauce, mozz, amd parmesean and bake... "Pork
    Cutlet Parm". Serve with ensalde, garlic bread, and dago red.

    Sheldon
     
  19. salgud

    salgud Guest

    I don't have the reicipe here, I'm at work, but one of my all time
    favorite recipes is Chris Schessinger's in "Licensed to Grill" for Rum
    Molasses BBQ'd Pork Chops, p. 148. I remember the page number because
    this is the first recipe I cooked from this cookbook. I was visiting my
    brother on the east coast, from Denver, and he had just gotten the
    cookbook and wanted to try this recipe. I raved so much about it that
    he bought me the cookbook. Still one of my favorites, seldon
    dissappoints. Have fixed this recipe for each of my 3 sons and one or
    two others, and gotten raves (getting raves from my sons is REALLY
    SOMETHING!).
     
  20. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BE318A2C.60B47%[email protected]
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to make
    > over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if they
    > are
    > boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb to
    > me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    > apples
    > and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut, so
    > that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but damned
    > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops, and
    > accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl



    Make Phillipine Adobo.

    This is about as good as any.


    Ingredients :

    1 1/4lb boneless pork shoulder cut 2" cubes
    1 cup water
    1/2 cup white vinegar
    2tbl soy sauce
    6x garlic cloves minced
    1/4tsp freshly-ground black pepper
    4tsp vegetable oil

    Method :
    On a rack in broiling pan, broil pork 6 inches from heat source until rare,
    5 to 6 minutes; transfer to 3-quart saucepan. Add water, vinegar, soy sauce,
    garlic, and pepper and stir well to combine; bring to a boil over high heat.
    Reduce heat, cover, and let simmer until pork is fork tender, 30 to 40
    minutes.
    Using slotted spoon, transfer pork to plate; set aside. Increase heat to
    high and cook pan juices, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced by
    half; remove from heat and reserve.
    In a 10-inch nonstick skillet heat oil over medium-high heat; add pork cubes
    and cook, turning meat frequently, until well browned on all sides, 4 to 5
    minutes. Add reserved pan juices and stir well; cook until sauce is heated,
    about 1 minute.
    This recipe yields 4 servings;

    Here's another.
    Philippine Pork Stir-Fry Adobo-Style
    Yield: 4 Servings

    Ingredients

    1/3 c soy sauce
    1/3 c red wine vinegar
    4 ts oil
    4 cloves garlic, finely -chopped
    3 bay leaves
    1 ts pepper
    1/4 ts (to 1/2) pepper sauce
    1 lb pork tenderloin, cut in 1 -inch piec; es
    1 1/2 c sliced zucchini
    1 c sliced mushrooms
    1 c chopped red or green bell -pepper
    1 cn (20 oz) pineapple chunks, -drained
    1/4 c sliced green onion

    Instructions

    In small bowl, combine soy sauce, vinegar, 3 teaspoons oil, garlic,
    bay leaves, pepper and pepper sauce.
    In non-metallic dish, combine pork with 1/2 cup soy sauce mixture.
    Marinate, covered, 15 minutes in refrigerator.
    In large skillet or wok over medium-high heat, heat 1 teaspoon oil.
    Drain pork, discarding marinade. Cook pork 3 minutes or until pork
    is cooked. Remove from pan.
    Add zucchini, mushrooms, and bell pepper to skillet. Cook 3
    minutes or until vegetables are tender-crisp.
    After romoving bay leaves, add remaining soy sauce mixture,
    pineapple, green onion and pork to skillet. Heat until hot.
    Serve over hot cooked rice.

    Source: St. Louis County Journal 2/14/96 Posted to National Cooking
    echo by: Vern Hoffman
     
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