Need Pork Chop Ideas....

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sheryl Rosen, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <BE318A2C.60B47%[email protected]>, Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Please help!
    >I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to make
    >over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if they are
    >boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb to me).


    Well, if they're boneless they may not be *really* good for this
    application -- but, being frozen, I guess they could be acceptable:

    A woman in the small southwest town of Roma in Queensland [Australia]
    has been charged with assault with a pork chop.

    Seems a bloke was helping his son and son's mate move camp after
    they'd been evicted from their rental accommodation and a dispute
    arose because one family owned the fridge and the other had paid
    for the contents of it (well the frozen pork chop at least).

    The poor bloke was brained with a frozen pork chop and required
    several stitches. A woman has been charged with "Bodily harm".
    It is believed that the weapon has been removed from the scene, and
    probably eaten. [ABC Regional Radio News, noon, 12 Feb 2005.]

    ObRecipe:

    By coincidence I had a pork chop for tea tonight. (Don't look at me
    like that -- I'm more 1000 miles from Roma. :)

    Actually, this is not a "recipe", more a "construction" or
    "compilation". The original idea was grilled/fried chop with
    onion/garlic/ginger and spuds and carrots for vegies. But it ended
    up like this:

    1. Marinated chop with soy sauce and ground ginger for about 1.5
    glasses of a nice red and a phone call.

    2. Started out to boil spuds/carrots, but then noticed I had several
    bananas approaching over-ripe (a major problem with buying bananas
    more than one at a time :) so decided on using one as the
    carbohydrate source, cooked with the chop. So then "julianned" the
    two pretty large carrots (to try my new Zyliss slicer gizmo) and
    zapped them in the microwave (two minutes wasn't quite enough and four
    proved to be a whisker over what I was aiming for).

    3. Drizzled some oil over the chop rind (pre-cut into about 20 mm
    sections through the skin, but not into the meat) then sprinkled some
    salt on it (the rind only) fairly liberally.

    4. Started the onion slices frying, then added the chop to the pan,
    making sure the rind was sort of tucked under as much as possible so
    the whole width of it was in contact with the bottom of the hot pan.

    5. Tossed the onion rings about until it looked like the chop was
    pretty well cooked on one side (juices oozing out on top); then turned
    the chop (not quite so fussy with the rind this time) and added finely
    chopped garlic and ginger to the pan mixed through the onions. (Had
    intended to use fresh ginger, but if it's still in the fridge I
    couldn't find it. Luckily, I noticed I still had a jar of 30-month
    old ginger "pickled" in sherry in the fridge, so chopped up a lump of
    that -- not too bad either, certainly still with plenty of bite.)
    Also added the banana about this time (halved longitudinally) to fry
    it for awhile. Continued cooking until fairly clear juices emerging
    from the top of the chop.

    6. Mixed a bit of corn flour into the leftover marinade ("extended" a
    bit with water) then stirred this through the onion brew *after*
    removing the cooked chop and banana, and continued cooking until the
    "gravy" thickened nicely.

    7. Poured the onion gravy over the chop; added a sprinkle of nutmeg to
    the cooked carrots and added them to the plate alongside the chop.

    8. By then had finished the second glass of red, so poured another and
    sat down to eat.

    Result wasn't bad either. The rind was nice and crisp as intended,
    and the chop was "just right".

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     


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  3. biig <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:

    > I don't have cream of onion soup, but have cream of celery...I think
    >I'll try that. Do you think I could do a batch and freeze the
    >leftovers? Or would the soup separate????


    I'm thinking that the soup would separate. But you could freeze the
    leftover cooked chops without the sauce, then reheat them with a new can of
    cream of <whatever> soup when it comes time to eat them.

    We're making the cream of onion variety for tonight's dinner. There will
    be no leftovers. ;) We're only making two thick chops. I'll likely
    butterfly them.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  4. [email protected] (Phred) , if that's their real name, wrote:

    >A woman in the small southwest town of Roma in Queensland [Australia]
    >has been charged with assault with a pork chop.
    >
    >Seems a bloke was helping his son and son's mate move camp after
    >they'd been evicted from their rental accommodation and a dispute
    >arose because one family owned the fridge and the other had paid
    >for the contents of it (well the frozen pork chop at least).
    >
    >The poor bloke was brained with a frozen pork chop and required
    >several stitches. A woman has been charged with "Bodily harm".
    >It is believed that the weapon has been removed from the scene, and
    >probably eaten. [ABC Regional Radio News, noon, 12 Feb 2005.]


    ROFLMAO!! Thanks for sharing that. What a stitch!

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  5. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 04:18:56 GMT, Hahabogus
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 06:45:36 GMT, Hahabogus
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > news:[email protected]:
    > > >
    > > > > What happened to garlic and thyme?
    > > >
    > > > They moved to detroit and started a Rock and Roll Band.

    > >
    > > :)
    > > And their lead singer is Rosemary?
    > >
    > >
    > > sf
    > >

    >
    > You bought their Album?


    I'm a fan!

    :)


    sf
     
  6. sf <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:

    >I'm a fan!


    No you're not. You're a person. Might wanna see a doctor about this
    delusional thinking. ;)

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  7. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 14:06:29 GMT, [email protected]
    (Phred) wrote:

    > Why "2 hrs"? The cooking time given is only ca. 45 minutes total (for
    > chook at least) and I find it hard to believe that it takes an hour or
    > so to "balance the soy & vinegar". (At a guess, the rest of the
    > preparation described shouldn't take even 15 minutes, should it?)



    You disregarded the "approx"? That's prep time too. Also,
    bigger chunks of pork can use a good two hours of cooking,
    it should be not quite falling apart (IOW: fork tender). Of
    course less cooking time is needed for chicken unless you
    like eating it in shreds.

    sf
     
  8. Hackman

    Hackman Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > Please help!
    > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to

    make
    > over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if

    they are
    > boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb

    to me).
    >
    > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,

    apples
    > and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,

    so
    > that's out.
    >
    > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but

    damned
    > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    >
    > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops,

    and
    > accompaniments?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Sheryl
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    >My dictionary says that "chop" means that it has a bone. >But what

    would you call these, then?
    >Boneless pork chop conveys exactly what it is.


    Nope... "Boneless Pork Chop" defines *nothing*, except that either the
    butcher is a pinhead or the butcher thinks the consumers are pinheads,
    the latter is most often the truth. Pork chops can be loin chops but
    can also be shoulder chops. What Sheryl has there is most likely
    "boneless pork loin medalions", not chops... in fact we're not quite
    sure from which section of the loin, although they're usually from the
    center cut (the bones are then stripped cleanly of all remaining meat
    and fat, which is added to the pork sausage mix - no waste - and this
    technique actually nets the meat purveyer more profit). If at a
    restaurant you ordered the "Lamb Chops Special" and were served chunks
    of boneless mystery meat you'd be the first to scream WTF! The bone
    not only defines it's a chop but also which cut. Btw, by convention
    there are no beef chops... those are called rib steaks or chuck
    steaks... a boneless rib steak would be labeled "Ribeye Steak"... a
    boneless chuck steak is chuck filet, sometimes called a California
    Steak, don't laugh, it's not CA's answer to NY Steak. California Steak
    is really great grilled. You really ought to learn your meat cuts, or
    stick to tube steak.
     
  10. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Kswck wrote:
    > "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BE318A2C.60B47%[email protected]
    > > Please help!
    > > I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to

    make
    > > over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone, if

    they
    > > are
    > > boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just sounds dumb

    to
    > > me).
    > >
    > > I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    > > I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    > > Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    > > I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with

    onions,
    > > apples
    > > and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    > > The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for

    sauerkraut, so
    > > that's out.
    > >
    > > I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but

    damned
    > > if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all along.
    > >
    > > Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork

    chops, and
    > > accompaniments?
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    > > Sheryl
    > >

    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Pork: Herbed Pork Medallions
    >
    > Recipe By :
    > Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories :
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 1/2 pounds pork tenderloin


    Tenderloin and loin are not synonymous... tenderloin could never be a
    chop. You need to offer a recipe using pork loin, NOT pork tenderloin.
     

  11. > Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >> Please help!
    >> I have center cut boneless pork chops in the freezer that I want to
    >> make over the weekend. (Yeah, I know, technically chops have a bone,
    >> if they are boneless they are steaks, whatever..."pork steaks" just
    >> sounds dumb to me).
    >>
    >> I'm tired of marinating them and grilling them.
    >> I'm tired of Shake-n-Bake-ing them.
    >> Making them with stuffing doesn't inspire me.
    >> I have even done them as I do a loin roast, pan roasted with onions,
    >> apples and apple cider. That's getting "old" too.
    >> The person I'm having as a dinner guest doesn't care for sauerkraut,
    >> so that's out.
    >>
    >> I know there must be a million and one ways to cook pork chops, but
    >> damned if I can think of any other than what I've been doing all
    >> along.
    >>
    >> Any ideas of something different to do with boneless loin pork chops,
    >> and accompaniments?
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >> Sheryl

    >
    >


    Breaded and pan fried. If thick, they can be pounded thin into "cutlets".

    Wayne
     
  12. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 11:42:49 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    > >I'm a fan!

    >
    > No you're not. You're a person. Might wanna see a doctor about this
    > delusional thinking. ;)
    >

    Well, I do have to see him about that full feeling I have at
    the end of every meal - so I'll add this problem to my list.


    sf
     
  13. "Sheldon" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >"Boneless Pork Chop" defines *nothing*, except that either the
    >butcher is a pinhead or the butcher thinks the consumers are pinheads,
    >the latter is most often the truth. Pork chops can be loin chops but
    >can also be shoulder chops. What Sheryl has there is most likely
    >"boneless pork loin medalions", not chops...


    Hey, medallions sounds a lot more sophisticated than boneless pork chop,
    which I generally put in quotation marks because I know how strongly you
    feel about this subject. Medallions are, in fact, labeled as boneless pork
    chops, so it's not really fair to blame the consumer for picking that term
    up.

    But Crash and I are having lovely pork medallions for dinner tonight.
    Maybe I should wear a dress?

    Carol, suddenly feeling glamorous
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  14. sf <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 11:42:49 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> , if that's their real name, wrote:
    >>
    >> >I'm a fan!

    >>
    >> No you're not. You're a person. Might wanna see a doctor about this
    >> delusional thinking. ;)
    >>

    >Well, I do have to see him about that full feeling I have at
    >the end of every meal - so I'll add this problem to my list.


    Well, I'm just glad to know that you're taking care of yourself.

    Carol <grinning>
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  15. Sheryl  Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    Sheldon at [email protected] wrote on 2/12/05 1:41 PM:

    >
    > Nope... "Boneless Pork Chop" defines *nothing*, except that either the
    > butcher is a pinhead or the butcher thinks the consumers are pinheads,
    > the latter is most often the truth. Pork chops can be loin chops but
    > can also be shoulder chops. What Sheryl has there is most likely
    > "boneless pork loin medalions", not chops... in fact we're not quite
    > sure from which section of the loin, although they're usually from the
    > center cut


    I don't know what the term medallion means by strict definition, but to me,
    a medallion is a thin, small (maybe 1.5-2 inches), round slice of meat,
    usually cut from a single muscle.

    What I have was labeled "Boneless Center Cut Pork Loin". They are one inch
    thick "chops" (or steak, if you prefer). They are sort of oval in shape,
    about 4 inches long and 2 inches wide, with a thin strip of fat around the
    edge. Little or no marbling.
     
  16. One time on Usenet, [email protected] said:
    > [email protected] (Gal Called J.J.) , if that's their real
    > name, wrote:
    >
    > >One time on Usenet, [email protected] said:
    > >>
    > >> That being said, I have an alternative way of preparing them. I brown them
    > >> in a skillet, and move them into a baking pan. Deglaze the skillet with a
    > >> little water. Mix the water with a can of Campbell's Cream of Onion soup.
    > >> Pour the soup over the pork, cover with foil, and bake for about an hour at
    > >> 325F.
    > >>
    > >> The meat will be extremely tender and flavorful, and the soup/drippings
    > >> mixture forms a gravy that is great on mashed potatoes.

    > >
    > >This sounds good and quite easy. I'll bet the "gravy" would be good on
    > >egg noodles too. Thanks for sharing, Carol... :)

    >
    > You're very welcome. I'm thawing some boneless "chops" as we speak, and I
    > have a can of cream of onion soup.


    I'd never even heard of cream of onion soup, but it sounds yummy. :)

    > Guess what we're having for dinner
    > tomorrow night? No, tonight. About 18 hours from now.
    >
    > Never try to comprehend the words of an insomniac.


    Argh, my sympathies! I'm having the opposite problem today -- I
    slept waaay too long this morning and now I feel like my brain is
    made of soup. Dunno what kinds, something creamy though...

    --
    J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
    "You still haven't explained why the pool is
    filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
     
  17. biig <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    > I just popped this dish in the oven. I also browned some onion and
    >garlic in the pan before I put in the soup.


    Please let me know how/if you like it!

    >I'm also making my husbands
    >favourite dish for Valentines day......fried hamburger with cream of
    >mushroom soup stirred in, creamed corn and mashed potatoes.....he loves
    >it, but I'll have a steak.....Sharon


    I'd have a steak, too. I'm getting woozy just thinking of your husband's
    dinner. You're a brave soul.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  18. aem

    aem Guest

    Richard Green wrote:
    > This is my favourite pork chop recipe - I'm sure it'd be just as good


    > without the bones.-
    > Richard.
    >
    > Oven-Braised Pork Chops With Red Onions And Pears
    >
    > pork
    > ....
    > 2 cups balsamic vinegar
    > [snips]
    > In a small saucepan, bring the balsamic vinegar to a boil over high

    heat.
    > Adjust the heat to a gentle boil and boil until the vinegar is syrupy

    and
    > reduced to about 1/3 cup. Set aside.
    > [more snips]
    > Remove the skillet from the oven. Place a chop in the center of each
    > warmed serving plate. Check the seasoning of the onion-pear mixture,
    > adding salt and pepper if necessary. Spoon the pears, onion and pan

    juices
    > around the chops. Drizzle the balsamic vinegar reduction around the

    edge
    > of the plate.


    The recipe sounds delicious, but using 2 cups of balsamic vinegar to
    produce a decorative reduction around the edge of the plate seems
    pretty extreme for home-cooking. I just checked my bottle of good
    stuff from Modena and it's 16.9 ounces, so I'd need two bottles at
    several U.S. dollars each. Maybe for special dinner guests....

    -aem
     
  19. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 16:39:00 -0500, Sheryl Rosen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What I have was labeled "Boneless Center Cut Pork Loin". They are one inch
    > thick "chops" (or steak, if you prefer). They are sort of oval in shape,
    > about 4 inches long and 2 inches wide, with a thin strip of fat around the
    > edge. Little or no marbling.
    >

    My favorite cut! I season them with garlic, thyme, s&p and
    brown. When lightly browned I lower the heat, throw in some
    sherry and cook covered for a few more minutes until
    completely done. At the end I toss in enough sour cream to
    make a sauce, add a couple drops of L & P Worcestershire and
    it's done. Those skinny frozen green beans (haricot verts)
    from Trader Joes make a good vegetable, hubby and I differ
    over potato or rice but either is good.

    sf
     
  20. sf <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >I season them with garlic, thyme, s&p and
    >brown. When lightly browned I lower the heat, throw in some
    >sherry and cook covered for a few more minutes until
    >completely done. At the end I toss in enough sour cream to
    >make a sauce, add a couple drops of L & P Worcestershire and
    >it's done. Those skinny frozen green beans (haricot verts)
    >from Trader Joes make a good vegetable, hubby and I differ
    >over potato or rice but either is good.


    Wow, that sounds good. You can't go wrong with sour cream, either. Glad
    we bought a big hunk of pork loin.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
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