Need Recommendation for replacing a carbon fork with Steel

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by evadtheslayer, May 1, 2011.

  1. evadtheslayer

    evadtheslayer New Member

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    I have a 2005 Specialized Sequoia Comp with a carbon fork (and the zertz inserts). I am very concerned about the fork breaking and want to replace it with a steel model. The fork offset is 50 mm. It is a 1 1/8" threadless type. It is set up for Shimano long reach brakes and I use 700X32 tires without fenders.

    Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

    Thus far it seems like the Salsa Cassaroll fork might work.

    Dave

    Murrieta Ca
     
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  2. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    I don't have a lot of miles on it yet, but I am riding with a Surly Long Haul Trucker fork, and I really like how it feels--I thought it would be more punishing over bumps and such, but it's not. Since it's for a touring bike, it should handle 32C tires just fine (mine are 700x25C, and there is a LOT more room for rubber).

    Jason
     
  3. tafi

    tafi Member

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    I wouldn't be worried about a fork breaking unless it has been damaged. They are designed to handle the rigours of riding and then some. If they weren't then manufacturers would be up for a lot of legal problems.

    Personally my carbon forks (Mizunos or Dedas) have been up and down gutters and bunny-hopped over speed bumps and potholes uneventfully for a few years now. The only time I ever broke a fork was ploughing into a high speed pile-up. This crash would have broken a steel fork too (it broke me pretty well!).
     
  4. evadtheslayer

    evadtheslayer New Member

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    Go to bustedcarbon.com for an eyefull of carbon bike failures, including pro riders. They fail without warning. All parts and especially fork areas. Pictures tell a story that carbon does indeed fail and fail quite commonly, thus my desire to keep my body intact and go with good old steel.
     
  5. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    watchout also the combination of materials, a steel fork can damage an aluminium frame for example,
    all materials break out but only steel can be repaired - or at least easily repaired -
     
  6. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    bustedcarbon.com ... interestingly supported by the consortium of titanium framebuilders.

    Scary site but a most of the pictures seem to be taken after accidents, either bike racing or automobile. Ever see a 753 frame or another paper thin tubed steel bike after a big pile up? I can replicate in <5 secs with a sheet of 8.5x11 loose leaf. Other failures on the site seem to be connected to overtightening and other installation issues.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm no CF fanboy, not a single carbon part on my sub 18lb bike except for shifters (and fork) but putting things in perspective - with the quantity of CF bikes and products sold in this country and around the world, the fact we only have such a small archive of failures (mostly caused by accident) is actually reassuring to me. If you think about it, Carbon forks are spec'd on carbon, steel, aluminum, and titanium bikes and have been for close to two decades, worldwide. We are talking literally millions of bicycles, with a few dozen documented failures on the site, mostly after being driven over by a car or SUV. Apparently CF doesn't fair so well in accidents. I think I kinda knew that already. I couldn't find more than one incident of something breaking "just because".

    My favorite pic was this one juxtaposed with yet another destroyed CF bike: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_V54WWNeyyp4/SwqN81VWVVI/AAAAAAAAB-U/9p6wHe-ocWw/s1600/ford+truck.jpg
    ...maybe a steel bike would have been ok after?

    Good luck with finding a nice fork though. It is the one component that will add the most weight to your ride but because of steel's inherent ride quality, may actually be the most logical place for a steel component. My first few race bikes in the 1980's all had steel forks.

    I never did understand CF mountain bikes.
     
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  7. Eichers

    Eichers New Member

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    Hi evadtheslayer, perhaps you should add TI (titanium) to your list. Quality TI is much stronger an lighter than steel and rides at least as good. I will see if can find a URL for quality TI forks :)
     
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