Net instructions on rear wheel installation on road bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Roger Zoul, Oct 5, 2003.

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  1. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

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  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

  3. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Got the bike two weeks ago...had a flat on the rear tire...having troubles putting it back on...
    >
    > this is the bike:
    > http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=5963&JServSessionIdroot=qqjwe3on2l.j27001
    >
    > anybody got a net link with instructions/pictures? Thanks.

    Dear Roger,

    As already suggested, you may have to release the rear brake or at least deflate the tire to get it
    past the brake pads.

    It may help to set the rear derailleur to sit on the smallest rear cog.

    It also helps sometimes to pull backward on the whole derailleur assembly, whose springs can
    occasionally pull it forward enough to block the slot into which you're trying to drop the axle.

    If your seat, speedometer, and brake hoods will stand it (and you don't tell Jobst Brandt), it's
    much easier to wrestle with a reluctant rear wheel if you flip the bike upside-down.

    Good luck,

    Carl Fogel
     
  4. Maier

    Maier Guest

    Dr. Sheldon Brown's site has grown like a weed.

    Do you have the brakes with the metal cable housing and rubber accoridian? These also have levers
    that keep outward tension on the brakes. There are three variable holes giving different positions
    and amounts of pressure. These are tricky and you've got to press a metal stick into an
    uncomfortable position. I love this problem cause it gets under your skin until you look away from
    what you're doing and see that this brake thing isn't so exact. You'll be able to put the wheel into
    place with the brakes undone, but you won't be able to rotate the wheel.
     
  5. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Carl Fogel wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:<[email protected]>...
    ::: Got the bike two weeks ago...had a flat on the rear tire...having troubles putting it back on...
    :::
    ::: this is the bike:
    :::
    http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=5963&JServSessionIdroot=qqjwe3on2l.j27001
    :::
    ::: anybody got a net link with instructions/pictures? Thanks.
    ::
    :: Dear Roger,
    ::
    :: As already suggested, you may have to release the rear brake or at least deflate the tire to get
    :: it past the brake pads.

    I did deflate the tire a bit and I could get the tire past the brake pads.

    ::
    :: It may help to set the rear derailleur to sit on the smallest rear cog.

    I did that before removing the wheel.

    ::
    :: It also helps sometimes to pull backward on the whole derailleur assembly, whose springs can
    :: occasionally pull it forward enough to block the slot into which you're trying to drop the axle.

    That is the problem, along with not really knowing the correct path the chain must take. I when to
    the LBS to inspect some correctly assembled bikes. I even took pictures :)

    ::
    :: If your seat, speedometer, and brake hoods will stand it (and you don't tell Jobst Brandt), it's
    :: much easier to wrestle with a reluctant rear wheel if you flip the bike upside-down.

    I might try this....holding the bike in place while getting the wheel aligned and in position makes
    it more difficult. I think it is just an experience, or lack of it, sort of thing.

    Thanks for the comments.
     
  6. Mark Watkins

    Mark Watkins Guest

    For a newbie, like myself, putting the rear wheel back on can be very tricky. Get the chain on the
    smallest rear cog before removing the wheel. When putting the wheel back on, pull the derailer way
    down, and have the chain sit on top of the small cog while replacing the wheel. My best advice is to
    have an experienced cyclist show you how to do it, and practice while he/she is there to correct
    your mistakes. It is very easy if you know exactly how to do it, and really hard if you don't
     
  7. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    mark watkins wrote:
    :: For a newbie, like myself, putting the rear wheel back on can be very tricky. Get the chain on
    :: the smallest rear cog before removing the wheel. When putting the wheel back on, pull the
    :: derailer way down, and have the chain sit on top of the small cog while replacing the wheel. My
    :: best advice is to have an experienced cyclist show you how to do it, and practice while he/she is
    :: there to correct your mistakes. It is very easy if you know exactly how to do it, and really hard
    :: if you don't

    Thanks for your comments...I think you see my problems...since your description seems to
    make perfect sense to me :) I did get the chain tot he smallest rear cog, so I'm happy for
    that, at least!
     
  8. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Carl Fogel wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:<[email protected]de>...
    ::: Got the bike two weeks ago...had a flat on the rear tire...having troubles putting it back on...
    :::
    ::: this is the bike:
    :::
    http://www.specialized.com/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=5963&JServSessionIdroot=qqjwe3on2l.j27001
    :::
    ::: anybody got a net link with instructions/pictures? Thanks.
    ::
    :: Dear Roger,
    ::
    :: As already suggested, you may have to release the rear brake or at least deflate the tire to get
    :: it past the brake pads.
    ::
    :: It may help to set the rear derailleur to sit on the smallest rear cog.
    ::
    :: It also helps sometimes to pull backward on the whole derailleur assembly, whose springs can
    :: occasionally pull it forward enough to block the slot into which you're trying to drop the axle.
    ::
    :: If your seat, speedometer, and brake hoods will stand it (and you don't tell Jobst Brandt), it's
    :: much easier to wrestle with a reluctant rear wheel if you flip the bike upside-down.

    I balanced the bike on the handlebars with the rear wheel straight up....

    I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....

    howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either side,
    and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid of
    this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the chain to
    fully seat within the dropout...

    any ideas on what to try next?
     
  9. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > any ideas on what to try next?

    Consult- in person- someone who can watch what you're doing and correct your mistakes. If you bought
    the bike at a shop, go back. They should be willing to help out.

    Jeff
     
  10. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... [snip]
    >
    > I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....
    >
    > howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    > dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either
    > side, and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid of
    > this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the chain
    > to fully seat within the dropout...
    >
    > any ideas on what to try next?

    Dear Roger,

    It's faintly possible that you have to reason with it more forcefully.

    You might try pulling on the chain-stay tubes to spread them slightly--they should flex outward a
    tiny bit without any danger of breaking the frame.

    Grabbing the rim and waggling the wheel while pulling it into the frame might also overcome a minor
    mismatch. With some stubborn parts, it's more a matter of confidence from previous success than
    actual brute strength. These parts are fairly sturdy.

    Again, you may need to pull the derailleur back before the axle will seat fully. If the part of the
    derailleur near the dropout interferes at all, you have very poor leverage with just the axle for
    pushing it out of the way.

    If all else fails, a bike shop can probably either slap it in place in an embarrassing moment,
    explain what washer or part has been reassembled in the wrong order, or console you that it's not
    your fault because the wretched thing is somehow damaged.

    Good luck,

    Carl Fogel
     
  11. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Jeff Wills wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:<[email protected]>...
    :::
    ::: any ideas on what to try next?
    ::
    :: Consult- in person- someone who can watch what you're doing and correct your mistakes. If you
    :: bought the bike at a shop, go back. They should be willing to help out.
    ::

    Right...I'll give it one more good shot and if that doesn't get it, I'll go back to the shop. I felt
    I made significant progress on the next attempt after posting here. Sadly, I only get a couple of
    minutes a day to fiddle on weekdays (of course, I could have been riding on Sunday and Monday were
    it not for a flat on the rear).
     
  12. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Roger Zoul <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I balanced the bike on the handlebars with the rear wheel straight up....

    > I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....

    > howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    > dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either
    > side, and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid of
    > this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the chain
    > to fully seat within the dropout...

    > any ideas on what to try next?

    Now you should place the bike right side up. Loosen the quick release a bit, and the weight of the
    bike will cause the axel to drop into place.

    Then make sure the tire is centered between the chainstays. Adjust the quick release so that you
    start to feel resistance when the lever is half closed. Then, without disturbing the wheel position,
    press the lever fully closed. Spin the wheel and make sure everything is working normally.

    Art Harris
     
  13. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Harris wrote:
    :: Roger Zoul <[email protected]> wrote:
    ::
    ::: I balanced the bike on the handlebars with the rear wheel straight up....
    ::
    ::: I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....
    ::
    ::: howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    ::: dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either
    ::: side, and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid
    ::: of this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the
    ::: chain to fully seat within the dropout...
    ::
    ::: any ideas on what to try next?
    ::
    :: Now you should place the bike right side up. Loosen the quick release a bit, and the weight of
    :: the bike will cause the axel to drop into place.
    ::
    :: Then make sure the tire is centered between the chainstays. Adjust the quick release so that you
    :: start to feel resistance when the lever is half closed. Then, without disturbing the wheel
    :: position, press the lever fully closed. Spin the wheel and make sure everything is working
    :: normally.

    Oh....something else to try! Thanks.

    ::
    :: Art Harris
     
  14. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Carl Fogel wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:<[email protected]>... [snip]
    :::
    ::: I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....
    :::
    ::: howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    ::: dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either
    ::: side, and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid
    ::: of this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the
    ::: chain to fully seat within the dropout...
    :::
    ::: any ideas on what to try next?
    ::
    :: Dear Roger,
    ::
    :: It's faintly possible that you have to reason with it more forcefully.
    ::
    :: You might try pulling on the chain-stay tubes to spread them slightly--they should flex outward a
    :: tiny bit without any danger of breaking the frame.
    ::
    :: Grabbing the rim and waggling the wheel while pulling it into the frame might also overcome a
    :: minor mismatch. With some stubborn parts, it's more a matter of confidence from previous success
    :: than actual brute strength. These parts are fairly sturdy.
    ::
    :: Again, you may need to pull the derailleur back before the axle will seat fully. If the part of
    :: the derailleur near the dropout interferes at all, you have very poor leverage with just the axle
    :: for pushing it out of the way.
    ::
    :: If all else fails, a bike shop can probably either slap it in place in an embarrassing moment,
    :: explain what washer or part has been reassembled in the wrong order, or console you that it's not
    :: your fault because the wretched thing is somehow damaged.
    ::

    :) Honestly, I feel as if since I bought the bike, I must master this very
    basic thing. However, if I don't get it going with all of these good ideas, I'll tuck tail and take
    it back to the LBS...then the drop-dead gorgeous honey who sold me the bike can snicker at me for
    not being able to do simply stuff with it. Damn!

    Thanks for the help!

    :: Good luck,
    ::
    :: Carl Fogel
     
  15. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > :) Honestly, I feel as if since I bought the bike, I must master this very
    > basic thing. However, if I don't get it going with all of these good
    ideas,
    > I'll tuck tail and take it back to the LBS...then the drop-dead gorgeous honey who sold me the
    > bike can snicker at me for not being able to do
    simply
    > stuff with it. Damn!

    Just pretend you're only doing it as a pretense to check her out again :)

    Bill "two birds with one quick release" S.
     
  16. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    Message 1 in thread From: g.daniels ([email protected]) Subject: DIY tire removal

    View this article only Newsgroups: rec.bicycles.tech Date: 2003-01-31 08:18:58 PST

    try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in all
    around twice and work the tire massage bead in to the opposite side of the nipple! holding tire
    vertically pull up on that opposite side while holding tire down litely with the foot.pull pul pull
    then place the first lever in at that pull spot and fix it to a spoke with the tools's crook then
    work the bead in and around and toward that lever again! the repeat bead in and move around with the
    lever's help at the other side is trick. lube the tire's leading edge bead with wax/tef and stick
    the tool in and gently pry the bead out. put another tool in just ahead of the last tool fixing each
    to a spoke. remove the middle tool and place it under the bead and just over the rim and pry that
    small section of tire bead out.repeat.repeat until the bead no longer resists and will leave the
    tire rim with a finger under the bead.I write from experience. Never assume the bead is in, make
    sure the bead is in. the odds are that the problem is the mechanic's not the manufacturer.
     
  17. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 6 Oct 2003 11:27:14 -0700, [email protected] (Carl Fogel) may have said:

    >If your seat, speedometer, and brake hoods will stand it (and you don't tell Jobst Brandt), it's
    >much easier to wrestle with a reluctant rear wheel if you flip the bike upside-down.

    And if you're finicky about stressing the cables or brake hoods, a few pieces of 2x4 judiciously
    placed can alleviate that tension and make it a moot point. (When I invert my road bike to work on
    it, I have a bridge made from one long and two short pieces of 2x4 which fits in and supports the
    bars across the drops; the rest of the stuff never hits the ground.) (For the MTBs, a pair of
    supports out near the ends of the bars, with a notch to prevent them from sliding off, keeps
    everything about 4" above the ground very nicely.)

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  18. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    -snip remounting rear wheel- Roger Zoul wrote:
    > I balanced the bike on the handlebars with the rear wheel straight up....
    >
    > I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....
    >
    > howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    > dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either
    > side, and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid of
    > this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the chain
    > to fully seat within the dropout...
    >
    > any ideas on what to try next?

    If your gear changer mounts on an adapter, the wheel will be properly situated when the axle's all
    the way back on the right side and somewhere in the middle on the left side.

    Just ensure the tire is centered between the seatstays and between the chainstays.

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  19. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    A Muzi wrote:
    :: -snip remounting rear wheel- Roger Zoul wrote:
    ::: I balanced the bike on the handlebars with the rear wheel straight up....
    :::
    ::: I got everything hooked up...breaks work, gears shift, wheel spins....
    :::
    ::: howeer, I'm not confident as the real axle does not seem to be fully seating within the frame
    ::: dropout....even though the quick release level is firmly closed....I can see a space on either
    ::: side, and I can see where there is an imprint of grease where the axle used to be....I'm afraid
    ::: of this...I've tried adjusting it twice, but I have not been able to get the side opposite the
    ::: chain to fully seat within the dropout...
    :::
    ::: any ideas on what to try next?
    ::
    :: If your gear changer mounts on an adapter, the wheel will be properly situated when the axle's
    :: all the way back on the right side and somewhere in the middle on the left side.

    Hmmm...that is an interesting comment. I don't know if the gear changer is mounted on an adapter or
    not, but the axle did easily go all the way back on the right side and somewhere in the middle on
    the left, as you state. I was trying to get it all the way back on both sides, but that seemed to
    uncenter the tire.
    ::
    :: Just ensure the tire is centered between the seatstays and between the chainstays.

    I'm not sure what the seatstays and chainstays are. I'll check Sheldon's site for info. Thanks.
     
  20. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 6 Oct 2003 11:27:14 -0700, [email protected] (Carl Fogel) may have said:
    >
    >
    > >If your seat, speedometer, and brake hoods will stand it (and you don't tell Jobst Brandt), it's
    > >much easier to wrestle with a reluctant rear wheel if you flip the bike upside-down.
    >
    > And if you're finicky about stressing the cables or brake hoods, a few pieces of 2x4 judiciously
    > placed can alleviate that tension and make it a moot point. (When I invert my road bike to work on
    > it, I have a bridge made from one long and two short pieces of 2x4 which fits in and supports the
    > bars across the drops; the rest of the stuff never hits the ground.) (For the MTBs, a pair of
    > supports out near the ends of the bars, with a notch to prevent them from sliding off, keeps
    > everything about 4" above the ground very nicely.)

    Dear Werehatrack,

    Once again, I find myself wondering why other people have the better ideas. Your rack and notch
    sound excellent. I never thought past a scrap of 2x4 under one brake hood to tilt the bike so that
    the oil would drip away from the frame and seat.

    Time to do some carpentry--to the Bat Cave!

    Carl Fogel
     
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