neuromuscular training?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by JungleBiker, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. JungleBiker

    JungleBiker New Member

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    I read some months ago in a US magazine about a technique where you warm up for 10 minutes and then stand on one leg, hold yourself steady with a hand against a wall or tree and then do "cycling motions" with the raised leg for so many repetitions, then change legs, etc. I think they called it neuromuscular training. I'd be interested to know what the experts like Ric think about this technique?
    Thanks.
     
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  2. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    my feeling is that it would make you excellent at doing "cycling motions" while supporting yourself against a wall. Sounds like a complete waste of time, unless you invent a new sport ("virtual cycling while supporting yourself against a wall").

    Cycling is a gross motor control sport, that just about anyone can do. in fact, as the legs are constrained in the sagittal plane, efficiency is pretty similar between untrained individuals and elite pros. this is different to e.g., running, where technique is important (e.g., if anyone looked at me "running" they'd laugh as i have no running technique).

    My advice: stay away from such magazines that publish rubbish. and ride a real bike more.

    ric
     
  3. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    [QUOTE=ric_stern

    Cycling is a gross motor control sport, that just about anyone can do. in fact, as the legs are constrained in the sagittal plane, efficiency is pretty similar between untrained individuals and elite pros. this is different to e.g., running, where technique is important (e.g., if anyone looked at me "running" they'd laugh as i have no running technique)






    " the legs are constrained in a sagittal plane " is a statement that is always
    used by "experts" when shooting down innovative ideas . While the legs
    may be attached to the pedals and cranks which continually rotate, there
    is no restriction on how the various muscles are used or even more important,
    how they may be combined for increased power production or how this
    increased power can be more effectively applied to the pedals by more
    advantageous use of the ankles.
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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