New bicycle selection and more....

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Triplecentury, Jul 8, 2003.

  1. Triplecentury

    Triplecentury New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2003
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am shopping for a new road bicycle and would appreciate any advice on selection. I curently own a Reynolds 531 frame (1989 era) and am interested primarily in comfort (double to triple centuries).

    It looks like Al is out due to the shock factor. I am considering carbon fiber (Trek 5200/Kestrel Talon). Today I discovered that Litespeed puts out a 'bargain bike' called the Arenberg for around $2200 US with a Ti Frame and Carbon fiber forks. Oh boy.

    I would appreciate any advice, rants & raves from the road riding community on this subject. Any opinions on components (105, Ultegra, Centaur etc) are certainly welcome. Triple crank is essential.

    Thanks in advance for any help on this!

    P.S. Has anyone done the Santa Cruz Mountain Challenge with a 42X24? That is my lowest gear and I'm a bit apprehensive.
     
    Tags:


  2. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2002
    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    0
    have a look at some of the aluminium bikes with carbon rear triangles apparently they are nice and comfy
     
  3. patch70

    patch70 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2003
    Messages:
    1,682
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a Bianchi Carbon which is seriously comfortable. Would also recommend Campag gear but that is a personal thing and depends on what you are used to. However, I like the longevity of Campag.

    I don't think a carbon rear triangle does add much comfort to a well-designed bike. Often it is done by the bike makers as it is easier to glue that in rather than do a series of welds. Then it gets marketed as 'new & improved comfort' which is not always accurate.

    The most important features for comfort are saddle, shorts, frame design and fit, tyres, tyre pressure, wheels, carbon forks, carbon seat post rather than frame material.
     
  4. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2003
    Messages:
    1,495
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you don't mind digging a little to find one, you might check out the carbon beam frames that Trek and Zipp made a couple of years ago. Now out of production, due largely to the UCI banning 'non traditional' frame designs for int'l competition, they're reasonably priced on the used market, and you can occasionally find new/never built framesets.

    As these are beam frames, they're easier on your butt than a traditional diamond. I've had mine (Trek Y-Foil) on one 75 mile ride, and posterior fatigue was not a problem. The Trek frame in particular is very aerodynamic. Combined with aero wheels (Rolf), it is noticably faster in sprints and downhills than comparably equipped traditional frames.

    ebay is the most reliable source for these frames, retailers have pretty much sold off their existing stock. But they're one fine ride, and for me, worth the extra fuss.
     
Loading...
Loading...