new bike build

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by kujo666666, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. kujo666666

    kujo666666 New Member

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    hello,
    I am new to cycling, and i bought a klein q-pron xx frame, and thought i would build it up myself, and was wanting to get some advice/help on doing it, i was wondering wondering about components, are they all compatioble? i was noticing differnt deralilleurs had differnt mm's,
    thanks
     
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  2. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Sweet frame- see my blog for photos of my Quantum Pro.

    Although not completely necessary, you'd probably be best off by choosing either Campy or Shimano for all the drivetrain stuff - ie, shifter/brake levers, brake calipers, crank, both derailleurs, and the cassette. Then within that choice you can mix and match parts from different groups - so you could have Ultegra 10 shifters, 105 brakes, and DuraAce crank... or Chorus shifters, Veloce brakes, and Record crank... whatever works for your budget. Maybe think about starting with your dream components and then start making concessions until you get down to a price you can live with.

    Specifically for Kleins - since they have internal derailleur cable routing, make sure you get the barrel adjusters that will work - Campy (last I checked) didn't have any that would work... Shimano has two kinds that will. The guys I know with Klein and Campy don't have any barrel adjusters, but maybe there's something new now.
     
  3. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    I presume you're talking about front derailleur clamps? Things like clamp-on front derailleurs, seat posts, forks, headsets, stems, and bars each come in a range of standard sizes. I would sit down with a good repair book like Lenard Zinn's so you can sort out exactly how things go together and how to measure for them. Putting a bike together is a lot of fun and not too hard, but you can make some expensive mistakes if don't know which questions to ask at the beginning.
     
  4. Eastway82

    Eastway82 New Member

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    Damn right!
    If you've got tools (you'll need a few special ones for BBs/cassette lockrings/ cranks etc) and deft fingers, it's no problem to build your own, but I really wouldn't advise the first one to be the one you're going to live with. There are so many variables (frame clips sizes, BB lengths, headset types/sizes etc) that it can all get a bit confusing. Why not buy a used and abused but basically decent road bike off Ebay or somewhere, strip it, learn about it, rebuild it as well as you can, then resell it? THEN launch yourself into your Klein with whole heap more experience. I've always built my own bikes since I was a kid and wouldn't have it any other way - there's nothing like knowing every nut and bolt on your bike – but it's inevitable that the first one's going to be a really steep learning curve!

    There is another way - some LBSs will help you through the process. I know of at least a few in the UK who run courses in bike building and wheel building.

    Fully agree that you' be better off choosing one drivetrain supplier. Makes life a lot easier (Shimano's more compatible with aftermarket kit, but I just prefer Campag!).
     
  5. free_rideman

    free_rideman New Member

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    Definitely! All these parts can get very confusing. I remember when I first got into riding, I would trust the shop to do anything remotely "complicated and mechanical". Now that I have had some experience and put together a couple bikes, I do everything myself.

    So first spend lots and lots of hours learning everything you can. Seeing what parts are the most cost effective. Then decide. Plus you won't get screwed over by your bike shop. They can smell fear. Sometimes my LBS can play tricks on my mind, but I try not to get affected and keep my opinions solid. If you let the LBS advise you on parts to buy too much than they will be getting much $$$ and you won't get something that is worth it.
     
  6. kujo666666

    kujo666666 New Member

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    thanks for all your help!! been doing alot of reading and searching the internet for the compatibleity.... and have a grip on it,
    thanks every one!!
    paul
     
  7. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I love this type of question. I have built a few bikes up from the frame and here are some thoughts.
    1. Get yourself a nice workstand, it makes the job easy, plus it's a nice way to store the bike when not using it.
    2. Personally, I never cut the carbon steer tubes myself. Every frame I have, has either been pre-cut or I had the shop do it.
    3. Leave the cables and housing a little long at first. Make sure you have enough slack after you purchase the right bar and stem. I cut mine, and then opted for a wider bar. I still had enough cable, but not as much as I would prefer.
    4. BB's have very fine threads. Make sure you have the proper thread pattern and you should be able to hand thread it easily when installing it. If you get early resistance, you might be cross threaded.
    5. Steerer tube length. I know many people that try to get a pro fit, cut the steerer too short and then end up flipping the stem so they can ride comfortably. A flipped stem is fine, but I would rather leave extra spacers on top of the stem than to go too short. Also, the stack height of stems as well as the angles may differ.
    6. Get the right tools (as mentioned before). Make sure you have the proper cable cutters. A dull or improper cutter can flatten the housing or leave frayed ends.
    7. Tourque wrench or a fine touch. Carbon tubes can snap from over tightening. Ti or light alloy hardware can do the same.
    8. Grease and carbon are not a good combination. Grease is perfect for threads in metal on metal applications, but it will corrode carbon steerer tubes or seatposts.
    9. Read Park Tool's website. I find it very informative and helpful.
    10. Have fun! I take my bikes apart every year, right down to the frame for a thourough cleaning/regreasing. I really enjoy building the bikes up again.
     
  8. kujo666666

    kujo666666 New Member

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    Thanks for the info,
    What is everyones input on the differnce between tublular wheelsets, and clincher wheelsets..
    thanks for the help everyone!!
    Paul
     
  9. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Please see the 3.499.021 previous posts on this subject for your answer
     
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