New bike or not

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave Kiely, May 16, 2003.

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  1. Dave Kiely

    Dave Kiely Guest

    I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    steel frame and RSX components. I mostly ride to keep in shape for XC ski races. I ride 2-3 times a
    week usually 30-60 miles at a time. I mix in mt biking and running as well. 95% of my road riding I
    do alone. The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking about upgrading.

    I wonder if it is worth it to put any money into this bike or save my money and get a new bike. I
    don't have much money to play with now but figured if I were to upgrade I would be looking at
    Ultegra level parts. Will I notice much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just need to
    find longer rindes since I will be covering longer distances with the same effort on a lighter bike.

    Thanks

    Dave
     
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  2. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Dave Kiely" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    > steel frame and RSX components. I mostly ride
    to
    > keep in shape for XC ski races. I ride 2-3 times a week usually 30-60
    miles
    > at a time. I mix in mt biking and running as well. 95% of my road riding
    I
    > do alone. The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking
    about
    > upgrading.
    >
    > I wonder if it is worth it to put any money into this bike or save my
    money
    > and get a new bike. I don't have much money to play with now but figured
    if
    > I were to upgrade I would be looking at Ultegra level parts. Will I
    notice
    > much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just need to find longer rindes since I will
    > be covering longer distances with the same
    effort
    > on a lighter bike.

    You won't notice much of a difference at all. I find that a fresh drivetrain makes any bike feel
    "new", which is a nice thing; but any speed advantages are basically non-existent. RSX should work
    fine for many years; but after 6 years of riding, you might need to replace the working parts
    (chainrings, chain, cassette) This will run you probably $100 or so, and is well worth it. You will
    probably find that the bike shifts much better, which may translate into more enthusiastic riding.

    That said, I just built up a lovely Soulcraft Royale custom road frame with Ultegra and Dura Ace
    components. The combination of a gorgeous superlight custom CrMo frame and Dura Ace is like magic.
    This bike says "let's race!" every time I ride it. Shifting is effortless and fluid. Responsiveness
    is instantaneous. There is no hint of harshness anywhere, even over brick paved streets. I can't
    explain it - it just feels fast (and is fast). I've likened it to a 20-year-old bottle of fine
    scotch. There isn't much difference between 12-year-old scotch and 20-year-old scotch; but that
    subtle difference is worth twice the price to those who appreciate it. The same can be said of many
    fine things. When we realize that even expensive bikes are cheap compared to just about everything
    else in adult life, it makes sense to ride what makes you happy.

    -Barry
     
  3. Jay Hill

    Jay Hill Guest

    Dave Kiely wrote:
    > I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    > steel frame and RSX components. I mostly ride to keep in shape for XC ski races. I ride 2-3 times
    > a week usually 30-60 miles at a time. I mix in mt biking and running as well. 95% of my road
    > riding I do alone. The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking about upgrading.

    Why? Did you see an ad for a new bike with a pretty girl near it?
     
  4. Spacey Spade

    Spacey Spade Guest

    Jay Hill wrote:
    >Dave Kiely wrote:
    >> I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    >> steel frame and RSX components. I mostly ride to keep in shape for XC ski races. I ride 2-3 times
    >> a week usually 30-60 miles at a time. I mix in mt biking and running as well. 95% of my road
    >> riding I do alone. The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking about upgrading.
    >
    >Why? Did you see an ad for a new bike with a pretty girl near it?

    Best things in life are free.
     
  5. Doug

    Doug Guest

    >>Why? Did you see an ad for a new bike with a pretty girl near it?
    >
    >Best things in life are free.

    Last time I checked, women cost big money.

    Doug
     
  6. Frank121

    Frank121 Guest

    I know getting rid of one did...;-)

    <Last time I checked, women cost big money. Doug
     
  7. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

    "Dave Kiely" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    > steel frame and RSX components. I mostly ride
    to
    > keep in shape for XC ski races. I ride 2-3 times a week usually 30-60
    miles
    > at a time. I mix in mt biking and running as well. 95% of my road riding
    I
    > do alone. The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking
    about
    > upgrading.
    >
    > I wonder if it is worth it to put any money into this bike or save my
    money
    > and get a new bike. I don't have much money to play with now but figured
    if
    > I were to upgrade I would be looking at Ultegra level parts. Will I
    notice
    > much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just need to find longer rindes since I will
    > be covering longer distances with the same
    effort
    > on a lighter bike.

    If all you are doing is riding to keep in shape for XC ski races then the bike is fine and you don't
    need any upgrades or a new bike.

    Hawke
     
  8. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Dave Kiely" wrote:
    > I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    > steel frame and RSX components.

    Is your brother the same size as you? If the frame is the wrong size for you, that would be a good
    reason to get a new bike. Have you made any changes in setup (stem length, bar/saddle height, etc.)?

    > I mostly ride to keep in shape for XC ski races. 95% of my road riding I do alone. The bike is
    > fine and I have few complaints but was thinking
    about
    > upgrading.

    It sounds like you're happy with the bike, so why blow your money on a new one. This bike should be
    fine for solo fitness rides.

    > I were to upgrade I would be looking at Ultegra level parts. Will I
    notice
    > much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just need to find longer rindes since I will
    > be covering longer distances with the same
    effort
    > on a lighter bike.

    I doubt you will notice much difference at all. I have used 105, Ultegra, and Dura Ace, and there
    really isn't a lot of difference. How much weight do you expect to save? A couple of pounds in bike
    weight isn't going to make a lot of difference. And since you're riding mostly solo for
    exercise/fitness, what does it matter?

    Art Harris
     
  9. mayokiely-<< I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's
    stock with steel frame and RSX components. >><BR><BR> << The bike is fine and I have few complaints
    but was thinking about upgrading.

    What problems do you want to solve? What questions do youi want answered?

    I say spend some $ on a good bike fit, spend some $ on a good massage therapist, leave the bike
    alone. The $ you spend for things like ultegra will not make the bike woprk better, unless something
    is broken or worn out.

    << Will I notice much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just need to find longer
    rindes since I will be covering longer distances with the same effort on a lighter bike.

    'Covering longer distances with a lighter bike' is in the realm of feet, not miles, maybe...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. Melisa Johns

    Melisa Johns Guest

  11. On Fri, 16 May 2003 13:31:07 -0400, Dave Kiely wrote:

    > The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking about upgrading.

    > I wonder if it is worth it to put any money into this bike or save my money and get a new bike. I
    > don't have much money to play with now but figured if I were to upgrade I would be looking at
    > Ultegra level parts. Will I notice much of a difference... ?

    What are you hoping to accomplish by upgrading the bike? You may save a few grams with Ultegra vs
    RSX, and they might conceivably work marginally better, but what's the driver here? Is the RSX stuff
    worn out and in need of replacement, or are you in the grip of Bike Lust? I suspect the latter,
    given the "bike is fine" statement.
     
  12. Spacey Spade

    Spacey Spade Guest

    Dave Kiely wrote:
    >I am currently riding a 97 Trek 470 that I got as a hand-me-down from my brother. It's stock with
    >steel frame and RSX components. I mostly ride to keep in shape for XC ski races. I ride 2-3 times a
    >week usually 30-60 miles at a time. I mix in mt biking and running as well. 95% of my road riding I
    >do alone. The bike is fine and I have few complaints but was thinking about upgrading.
    >
    >I wonder if it is worth it to put any money into this bike or save my money and get a new bike.
    >I don't have much money to play with now but figured if I were to upgrade I would be looking at
    >Ultegra level parts. Will I notice much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just
    >need to find longer rindes since I will be covering longer distances with the same effort on a
    >lighter bike.

    It's nice to have a second bike, so you can work on one at leisure while you ride the other. That
    is, if you like working on bikes and have the time to do it.
     
  13. Doug

    Doug Guest

    >I mostly ride to keep in shape for XC ski races.
    >
    >I wonder if it is worth it to put any money into this bike or save my money and get a new bike.
    >Will I notice much of a difference when and if I upgrade or will I just need to find longer rindes
    >since I will be covering longer distances with the same effort on a lighter bike.

    Dave,

    Since your end goal is to use the bike for training for XC races, I don't think a new one is a wise
    investment. Working your muscles and cardio system won't be even one lick different. Spend your
    money on better XC gear and training.

    When cycling itself becomes the end goal, then a new bike may be in order. Not so much for the added
    speed potential, which is very small, but for the enjoyment of the sport. When and if you get hooked
    on cycling, a nice bike makes the whole experience so much more satisfying IMO.

    I wasn't terribly proud of my old bike. Old bar mounted friction shifters, too much rust to fight
    off all the time, older 27" rims, etc. Quite antiquated by today's standards, but still quite
    functional. The bike was about 12 years old, from my college days no less. My new one, built from
    parts bought here and there, some new some old, is quite a beaut. Modern shifting and parts makes it
    slick looking and riding. I want to get out and ride on it, which is half the battle in getting
    enough riding time to make the body respond. I suppose I'll want something better later, but it's a
    toy as much as a tool for me, so why not? Luckily I don't lust easily (for metal things anyway) so
    that is some time off.

    An added bonus is that of the camaraderie of serious bike owners. Some may call it snobbery, I
    don't. It's like Porsche or Harley or Miata owners hanging out. Nice bike owners swap stories and
    admire gear. It's part of the whole cycling culture that's fun if you're into people.

    But unless all the facets of cycling are for you, a new bike will do so little.

    Doug
     
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