New Bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by jacobxray, Apr 25, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jacobxray

    jacobxray New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2003
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am looking into getting a new (and first) road bike. At the moment I only cycle to and from work and a few small rides on a 'commuter' style bike (SPECIALIZED SIRRUS A1). i am getting into the longer rides and this bike is probably no longer suitable (well it might be, not sure what i'll get out of a 'proper' road bike).
    So what I want advice on is what sort of bike should i be looking at. it will be a second bike specifically for road cycling (not racing though). I was thinking about spending about £400-£500.
    a second-hand bike might be OK, where's a good place to look?
    another possibility i guess would be improving the sirrus for longer rides.

    cheers
    jacob
     
    Tags:


  2. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    I went through the same process of wanting to upgrade and spent hours researching and came to the conclusion that an audax bike would suit my needs best as they are basically road bikes but with clearance for a rear mudguard, which is necessary if living in the UK. After much time investigating I opted for a Ribble Audax for about £500 which suited all my needs. They're good bikes and the service was good although I just got mine nicked but I'm going to replace it with another one.
     
  3. In message <[email protected]>, dannyfrankszzz
    <[email protected]> writes
    >they are basically road bikes but with clearance for a rear mudguard, which is necessary if living
    >in the UK

    You make it sound as if the UK is some sort of swamp. None of our four bikes has mudguards. I don't
    mind getting dirty. That's what showers are for.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  4. In message <[email protected]>, Pete Biggs
    <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> writes
    >Michael MacClancy wrote:
    >> None of our four bikes has mudguards. I don't mind getting dirty.
    >
    >Nor do I but I mind my bikes getting dirty. Do mind getting wet, though.

    And getting wet through is even worse. :)

    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  5. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Fri, 25 Apr 2003 17:19:09 +0100, Michael MacClancy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You make it sound as if the UK is some sort of swamp. None of our four bikes has mudguards. I don't
    >mind getting dirty. That's what showers are for.

    Swamp or not, I find cycling in the wet without mudguards a pretty miserable experience. I don't
    mind at all getting wet, the rain isn't the problem, it's the crap and filth that comes at you from
    the road that I dislike. All that nasty black oily grime over me? No thank you very much.

    It also plays havoc with visibility too. I guess it depends on your riding position but for me,
    without a front mudguard, as soon as I approach say 16 - 17mph the spray starts hitting me in the
    eyes. 20mph and up is like cycling with my face under the shower.

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Michael MacClancy wrote:
    > In message <[email protected]>, dannyfrankszzz
    > <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >> they are basically road bikes but with clearance for a rear mudguard, which is necessary if
    >> living in the UK
    >
    >
    > You make it sound as if the UK is some sort of swamp. None of our four bikes has mudguards. I
    > don't mind getting dirty. That's what showers are for.

    Mudguards certainly aren't *necessary* in the UK, but IME they make a worthwhile comfort difference
    on roads if there's any amount or surface water (especially if it's the usual festive mix of mud,
    water and old oil).

    I don't mind getting dirty on the MTB, that's what it's *for*, but on the road there just isn't nay
    need and a constant stream of cack getting sprayed all over me is less fun than getting over the
    very marginal extra drag mudguards produce.

    I can live with getting dirty, but I can live without it more easily. Most people used to cycling
    without them that haven't trued them are amazed at the difference when they try them out, and I
    wouldn't buy a bike for road use in the wet without them (racing doesn't appeal).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...