New bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Budgie, Sep 19, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Budgie

    Budgie Guest

    Hoping to take up cycling to keep (relatively) fit. At present I walk around 20 miles a week, so the
    legs aren't too bad.

    Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can get?

    Budgie

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 18/09/2003
     
    Tags:


  2. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Budgie must be edykated coz e writed:

    > Hoping to take up cycling to keep (relatively) fit. At present I walk around 20 miles a week, so
    > the legs aren't too bad.
    >
    > Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can get?
    >
    > Budgie
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 18/09/2003
    >
    >
    Have a look on ebay.

    --
    Ian

    http://www.catrike.co.uk
     
  3. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    0
    General concensus on this group that is you can't get a new 'decent' bike for <about 250. Below this they areeitehr very heavy, or likely to have components fall apart very quicky.

    Best bet is to look second hand in your local paper, e-bay can be very expensive at times.

    Bryan
     
  4. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Budgie wrote:

    > Hoping to take up cycling to keep (relatively) fit. At present I walk around 20 miles a week, so
    > the legs aren't too bad.
    >
    > Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can get?

    For £100 you will get something that might last until you get home, if you are lucky. You might get
    more reliability from a bike from your local tip.

    Best to look for a secondhand bike - shop windows, and other usual places.

    John B
     
  5. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "JohnB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Budgie wrote:
    >
    > > Hoping to take up cycling to keep (relatively) fit. At present I walk
    around
    > > 20 miles a week, so the legs aren't too bad.
    > >
    > > Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can
    get?
    >
    > For £100 you will get something that might last until you get home, if you
    are
    > lucky. You might get more reliability from a bike from your local tip.
    >
    > Best to look for a secondhand bike - shop windows, and other usual places.
    >
    > John B
    >
    Budgie, regards the statement above, it's a load of Bollox (tm) - sorry John!!. You can get a
    perfectly light serviceable bike for road riding that will last an acceptable level of time, given
    the cost and can have components replaced as they wear out, with equal or superior as you
    progress. I bought a rigid (i.e., no suspension) Universal pseudo-mountain bike (i.e. pretending
    to be to those who don't do mountain biking.) in 1999. I rode it daily for 6 months (i.e. loss of
    licence) and had absolutely no problems. It has a Cromoly frame, V-brakes and 21 gears. Since then
    I've increased the number of bikes I've got to 10 (don't ask why, but beware ;-). All of them are
    second hand, best bargain was an old (27 years) Raleigh Sun 'racer'. This was an entry level bike
    when it came out and cost me £25 from someone that my wife knew at work. I use it for most of my
    road riding, along with a recumbent (the dark side!!). It's largely dependant on what kind of
    riding you want to do - on road, off-road a bit, off-road scary, all of the above. My Universal is
    perfectly good, following the purchase and fitting of a sprung saddle, for a mix of on-road /
    canal towpaths / bridleways and fire roads. This question has been asked many, many times and
    always gets a similar range of answers. I suggest a Google search might reveal a lot of facts.
    Don't be swayed into spending excessive amounts of money to begin with. Save that for later when
    you are sure you are comfortable with cycling and have an idea of how far you wish to go with it
    ;-) Use your local press. If you live in a highly populated area there should be a bicycle section
    in the sales that will provide you with opportunities to pick up a bargain. If you know anyone who
    is into cycling locally, it is always prudent to take them along when viewing (stating the
    obvious, I know) HTH, Dave.
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > Budgie, regards the statement above, it's a load of Bollox (tm) - sorry=

    > John!!.

    Well sorry Dave, I think John's on the money. At =A3100 new you'll get a=
    =20
    gaspipe clunker which is a chore to ride, double to =A3200 and you'll get=
    =20
    something which you actually might *want* to ride.

    > will last an acceptable level of time, given the cost and can have components replaced as they
    > wear out, with equal or superior as you progress.

    Unlikely to work on the frame though...

    If =A3100 is all you can afford I'd go second hand. I've yet to ride a=20 really cheap bike which I
    considered a pleasurable experience after a=20 few minutes.

    > Don't be swayed into spending excessive amounts of money to begin with.=
    Save
    > that for later when you are sure you are comfortable with cycling and h=
    ave
    > an idea of how far you wish to go with it ;-)

    Agreed, though IMHO you're more likely to be comfortable to *any* extent =

    with a =A3200 new bike of =A3100 second hand bike than you are with a new=
    =20
    =A3100 example. A =A3200 rigid hybrid like the Ridgeback or Dawes should=
    =20
    last as a competent basic bike for years, and will be quite serviceable=20 before you've replaced
    any grotty bits on it. =A3100 new bike is a false=
    =20
    economy IMHO.

    Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
    Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Snafu

    Snafu Guest

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]yonder.co.uk...

    >best bargain was an old (27 years) Raleigh Sun 'racer'. This was an entry level bike when it came
    >out and cost me £25
    from
    > someone that my wife knew at work.
    >
    >

    If you mean "Sun GT10", I bought one of those last week off Ebay for £6.50, it even had lights and
    a rack on it.

    Snafu
     
  8. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    Dave wrote:

    > Budgie, regards the statement above, it's a load of Bollox (tm) - sorry John!!.

    Well sorry Dave, I think John's on the money. At £100 new you'll get a gaspipe clunker which is a
    chore to ride, double to £200 and you'll get something which you actually might *want* to ride.

    > will last an acceptable level of time, given the cost and can have components replaced as they
    > wear out, with equal or superior as you progress.

    Unlikely to work on the frame though...

    If £100 is all you can afford I'd go second hand. I've yet to ride a really cheap bike which I
    considered a pleasurable experience after a few minutes.

    > Don't be swayed into spending excessive amounts of money to begin with.
    Save
    > that for later when you are sure you are comfortable with cycling and have an idea of how far you
    > wish to go with it ;-)

    Agreed, though IMHO you're more likely to be comfortable to *any* extent with a £200 new bike of
    £100 second hand bike than you are with a new £100 example. A £200 rigid hybrid like the Ridgeback
    or Dawes should last as a competent basic bike for years, and will be quite serviceable before
    you've replaced any grotty bits on it. £100 new bike is a false economy IMHO.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net p.j.clin[email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

    Peter, I'm responding from personal experience and recognise everyones right to their views.
    Unfortunately I think a lot of people are put off cycling by the initial large outlay.

    I really wish I'd have had the knowledge / confidence to go and buy second hand straight away. I
    bought cheap new with the view that I would have a certain amount of consumer rights backing me up
    if anything went wrong in the first few months prior to picking up the relevant knowledge once more
    and becoming familiar with good and bad LBSs. Now, several years later, I have the confidence and
    technical knowledge to pick out the bargains and make the most of them.

    Technical progress, whilst in the main is probably 'a good thing' is not necessarily so in all
    cases. Take gear changing for example. I was bought up on downtube friction shifters, never had any
    problem at all. I then left cycling for 20 odd years and by the time I came back to it, indexed
    shifters were all the rage. I have several bikes with variants of both, upto Shimano Deore XT on the
    mountain bike (proper not pseudo). To be very honest, and I've given them both a fair crack of the
    whip here, I still prefer the friction.

    Keeping in mind the basic raison d'etre for the bike is to get the rider from a-b, a bit quicker
    than walking and in a friendlier fashion than driving, as long as it's relatively light, has a
    useable gear range and effective brakes, it'll be fulfilling it's basic requirements.....anything
    else is just the icing on the cake.

    I do appreciate that giving a child a cheap (heavy) steel bicycle will probably have the undesired
    effect of putting them off cycling for life. However, there are effective cheap adult bikes
    available that will do the job for the price.

    Dave.
     
  9. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Snafu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >best bargain was an old (27 years) Raleigh Sun 'racer'. This was an entry level bike when it came
    > >out and cost me £25
    > from
    > > someone that my wife knew at work.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > If you mean "Sun GT10", I bought one of those last week off Ebay for £6.50, it even had lights
    > and a rack on it.
    >
    > Snafu
    >
    >
    No, this was A Raleigh Sun Solo...can't beat it though, can you ?
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > Peter, I'm responding from personal experience and recognise everyones =
    right
    > to their views. Unfortunately I think a lot of people are put off cycli=
    ng by
    > the initial large outlay.

    I'm responding from personal experience too: I find =A3100 budget bikes t= o=20 be awful, and I
    quite understand why so many of them get put in garages=20 and never ridden much. We must get
    "large outlay" into perspective. My next door neighbour=20 bought a Brompton a wee while back
    (=A3459), he wasn't a cyclist before h= e=20 got it. And he thinks it paid for itself in pure
    financial terms within =

    a year. Sure, if you haven't got the money, you haven't got the money,=20 but for a lot of people,
    especially people who can afford PCs and an=20 internet habit, =A3200 really is *not* that much
    compared to all sorts of=
    =20
    other things. That's only a little more than a year's car tax, don't=20 forget, and substantially
    less than petrol and insurance over a year.

    > I really wish I'd have had the knowledge / confidence to go and buy se=
    cond
    > hand straight away. I bought cheap new with the view that I would have =
    a
    > certain amount of consumer rights backing me up if anything went wrong =
    in
    > the first few months prior to picking up the relevant knowledge once mo=
    re
    > and becoming familiar with good and bad LBSs.

    Problem with consumer rights is that plain "not very much fun" isn't=20 covered.

    > Technical progress, whilst in the main is probably 'a good thing' is no=
    t
    > necessarily so in all cases. Take gear changing for example. I was boug=
    ht up
    > on downtube friction shifters, never had any problem at all. I then lef=
    t
    > cycling for 20 odd years and by the time I came back to it, indexed shi=
    fters
    > were all the rage. I have several bikes with variants of both, upto Shi=
    mano
    > Deore XT on the mountain bike (proper not pseudo). To be very honest, a=
    nd
    > I've given them both a fair crack of the whip here, I still prefer the friction.

    I can work with either, but it misses the point that where you used to=20 get pretty clunky 5 speeds
    you now get far better produced 8 speeds if=20 you spend just a little more money. Whether you use
    downtube friction=20 of bar mounted rapidfires doesn't alter the fact that the transmission=20 is
    better. But do you *really* prefer downtube friction shifters when you're on an=20 MTB? AFAICT
    indexing largely evolved from MTB-ers need to quickly and=20 accurately change gear without taking
    hands off the bars or end up=20 getting thrown off their bikes. Changing gear on radical terrain
    is=20 very different from doing it on the road. But now it's evolved that way then it's getting
    everywhere, even where=20 it's money spent on chrome rather than basic sound engineering. And=20
    =A3100 bikes are sold on how many marketing bullet points can get crammed=
    =20
    in under a =A399.99! splash price, not on how good a basic piece of sound=
    =20
    engineering can be built for the price. So we get bargain bikes with=20 suspension forks and disc
    brakes because they're perceived to be good.=20 And they *are* good, *if* you spend serious money on
    the engineering,=20 but of course that's not happening. Go to =A3200 and though there's even=
    =20
    *more* "never mind the quality, feel the width" machinery (full=20 suspension and discs now!)
    there's also sensibly built and specced=20 machinery designed for people looking for a working bike.
    And it's a=20 better working bike now than you'd have paid =A3200 for in 1990, showing =

    that in real terms prices are *very* much lower than they used to be.

    > Keeping in mind the basic raison d'etre for the bike is to get the ride=
    r
    > from a-b, a bit quicker than walking and in a friendlier fashion than driving, as long as it's
    > relatively light, has a useable gear range and=

    > effective brakes, it'll be fulfilling it's basic requirements.....anyth=
    ing
    > else is just the icing on the cake.

    The basic requirements should include being a nice enough experience for =

    the rider to want to do it again and again and again. Garages the=20 length of the land contain
    =A3100 bikes that don't get used, even though =

    they can get from A to B. And quite what you think "relatively light"=20 is I'm not sure: most
    =A3100 bikes weigh quite a bit, because they're mad= e=20 of low quality, reasonably thick steel
    tubing (and because fat tubes are =

    trendy, often heavier than they even need to be given the poor materials)=
    =2E

    > I do appreciate that giving a child a cheap (heavy) steel bicycle will probably have the undesired
    > effect of putting them off cycling for life=
    =2E

    No, not really that likely, as kids have little viable alternative to=20 what they're given and
    can't drive instead. Also the case that they're=20 generally pratting around on them rather than
    using them for A to B=20 travel, so if it gets a chore they just stop and play at something else.

    > However, there are effective cheap adult bikes available that will do t=
    he
    > job for the price.

    Not new for =A3100, that I've seen yet.

    Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
    Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. Simon Holt

    Simon Holt Guest

    "Budgie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hoping to take up cycling to keep (relatively) fit. At present I walk
    around
    > 20 miles a week, so the legs aren't too bad.
    >
    > Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can
    get?
    >
    > Budgie
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 18/09/2003
    >
    >
    I bought a Saracen Vex (aluminium frame) for £139 and am delighted with it.

    Simon
     
  12. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... Dave
    wrote: Garages the length of the land contain £100 bikes that don't get used, even though they can
    get from A to B. And quite what you think "relatively light" is I'm not sure: most £100 bikes weigh
    quite a bit, because they're made of low quality, reasonably thick steel tubing (and because fat
    tubes are trendy, often heavier than they even need to be given the poor materials).

    I've had a couple of Universal clunkers from insurance companies in the past and they were truly
    dreadful. I didn't know anything about bikes then, but I knew I didn't want to ride one of those.
    The Raleigh Pioneer hybrid I've now got with a 4130 Cro-Moly frame is a pleasure to ride and it
    only cost UKP 350.

    The frame is good enough to upgrade round, whereas a cheap nasty frame is not worth spending money
    on, re. better gears, saddles or wheels in the future. If 100 quid is your limit, then 2nd hand is
    best, like the others have already said.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  13. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    Dave wrote:

    > Peter, I'm responding from personal experience and recognise everyones
    right
    > to their views. Unfortunately I think a lot of people are put off cycling
    by
    > the initial large outlay.

    I'm responding from personal experience too: I find £100 budget bikes to be awful, and I quite
    understand why so many of them get put in garages and never ridden much. We must get "large outlay"
    into perspective. My next door neighbour bought a Brompton a wee while back (£459), he wasn't a
    cyclist before he got it. And he thinks it paid for itself in pure financial terms within a year.
    Sure, if you haven't got the money, you haven't got the money, but for a lot of people, especially
    people who can afford PCs and an internet habit, £200 really is *not* that much compared to all
    sorts of other things. That's only a little more than a year's car tax, don't forget, and
    substantially less than petrol and insurance over a year.

    > I really wish I'd have had the knowledge / confidence to go and buy
    second
    > hand straight away. I bought cheap new with the view that I would have a certain amount of
    > consumer rights backing me up if anything went wrong in the first few months prior to picking up
    > the relevant knowledge once more and becoming familiar with good and bad LBSs.

    Problem with consumer rights is that plain "not very much fun" isn't covered.

    > Technical progress, whilst in the main is probably 'a good thing' is not necessarily so in all
    > cases. Take gear changing for example. I was bought
    up
    > on downtube friction shifters, never had any problem at all. I then left cycling for 20 odd years
    > and by the time I came back to it, indexed
    shifters
    > were all the rage. I have several bikes with variants of both, upto
    Shimano
    > Deore XT on the mountain bike (proper not pseudo). To be very honest, and I've given them both a
    > fair crack of the whip here, I still prefer the friction.

    I can work with either, but it misses the point that where you used to get pretty clunky 5 speeds
    you now get far better produced 8 speeds if you spend just a little more money. Whether you use
    downtube friction of bar mounted rapidfires doesn't alter the fact that the transmission is better.
    But do you *really* prefer downtube friction shifters when you're on an MTB? AFAICT indexing largely
    evolved from MTB-ers need to quickly and accurately change gear without taking hands off the bars or
    end up getting thrown off their bikes. Changing gear on radical terrain is very different from doing
    it on the road. But now it's evolved that way then it's getting everywhere, even where it's money
    spent on chrome rather than basic sound engineering. And £100 bikes are sold on how many marketing
    bullet points can get crammed in under a £99.99! splash price, not on how good a basic piece of
    sound engineering can be built for the price. So we get bargain bikes with suspension forks and disc
    brakes because they're perceived to be good. And they *are* good, *if* you spend serious money on
    the engineering, but of course that's not happening. Go to £200 and though there's even *more*
    "never mind the quality, feel the width" machinery (full suspension and discs now!) there's also
    sensibly built and specced machinery designed for people looking for a working bike. And it's a
    better working bike now than you'd have paid £200 for in 1990, showing that in real terms prices are
    *very* much lower than they used to be.

    > Keeping in mind the basic raison d'etre for the bike is to get the rider from a-b, a bit quicker
    > than walking and in a friendlier fashion than driving, as long as it's relatively light, has a
    > useable gear range and effective brakes, it'll be fulfilling it's basic requirements.....anything
    > else is just the icing on the cake.

    The basic requirements should include being a nice enough experience for the rider to want to do it
    again and again and again. Garages the length of the land contain £100 bikes that don't get used,
    even though they can get from A to B. And quite what you think "relatively light" is I'm not sure:
    most £100 bikes weigh quite a bit, because they're made of low quality, reasonably thick steel
    tubing (and because fat tubes are trendy, often heavier than they even need to be given the poor
    materials).

    > I do appreciate that giving a child a cheap (heavy) steel bicycle will probably have the undesired
    > effect of putting them off cycling for life.

    No, not really that likely, as kids have little viable alternative to what they're given and can't
    drive instead. Also the case that they're generally pratting around on them rather than using them
    for A to B travel, so if it gets a chore they just stop and play at something else.

    > However, there are effective cheap adult bikes available that will do the job for the price.

    Not new for £100, that I've seen yet.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

    Oh, ok ;-) Dave. (must introduce you to my cheapo £100 new bike one day...it really sounds like a
    revelation ;-)
     
  14. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    : General concensus on this group that is you can't get a new 'decent' bike for <about 250. Below
    : this they areeitehr very heavy, or likely to have components fall apart very quicky.

    I think that number has gone down:

    Edinburgh Bike (www.edinburgh-bicycle.co.uk) will do you a nice hybrid for 220-240 and a nice
    mtb for 250.

    You can certainly get nice new bikes for 200 quid IMO. They'll be heavy sure, but if you choose well
    (no suspension for starters) they'll be perfectly servicable and last well.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Techolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  15. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > "JohnB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > For £100 you will get something that might last until you get home, if you
    > are
    > > lucky. You might get more reliability from a bike from your local tip.
    > >
    > > Best to look for a secondhand bike - shop windows, and other usual places.
    > >
    > > John B
    > >
    > Budgie, regards the statement above, it's a load of Bollox (tm) - sorry John!!. You can get a
    > perfectly light serviceable bike for road riding that will last an acceptable level of time,

    Sorry, but I think you are wrong. I have yet to see a bike at that price point that is at all
    reasonable to ride. It will be a complete waste of money and a false economy. Any 'dealer' selling
    such bikes will probably be rubbing their hands with glee at the prospect of return chargeable
    visits by the purchaser. Spend £200-£300 new and you may be in with a chance of something that will
    be enjoyable to ride.

    > given the cost and can have components replaced as they wear out, with equal or superior as you
    > progress.

    *If* the rider persevere's with such a machine and is not put off by the ride, this is likely to be
    necessary sooner rather than later. yes, you can upgrade components - at a price - but you will not
    change the basic gas-pipe tubing frame.

    > Since then I've increased the number of bikes I've got to 10 (don't ask why, but beware ;-). All
    > of them are second hand, best bargain was an old (27 years) Raleigh Sun 'racer'.

    So you too chose secondhand. Sensible and one that Budgie should seriously consider.

    > Use your local press. If you live in a highly populated area there should be a bicycle section in
    > the sales that will provide you with opportunities to pick up a bargain.

    Exactly what I advised.

    John B
     
  16. "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : General concensus on this group that is you can't get a new 'decent' bike for <about 250. Below
    > : this they areeitehr very heavy, or likely to have components fall apart very quicky.
    >
    > I think that number has gone down:
    >
    > Edinburgh Bike (www.edinburgh-bicycle.co.uk) will do you a nice hybrid for 220-240 and a nice mtb
    > for 250.
    >
    > You can certainly get nice new bikes for 200 quid IMO. They'll be heavy sure, but if you choose
    > well (no suspension for starters) they'll be
    perfectly
    > servicable and last well.
    >
    > Arthur
    >
    > --
    > Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Techolibertarians make a philosophy out of a
    > personality defect"
    > - Paulina Borsook

    I was about to suggest Edinburgh Bicycle as well. I think they do a good job and their frames are
    worth upgrading in time; although the only thing I have upgraded on mine after 2 years is the
    rubbish pedals - later versions have better ones. I think the other thing the OP needs to look at is
    the cost of other sports equipment e.g walking boots or running shoes by which time £200-250 is
    going to look astonishing value for a new bicycle. Julia
     
  17. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 12:41:33 +0100, JohnB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >Budgie wrote:
    >
    >> Hoping to take up cycling to keep (relatively) fit. At present I walk around 20 miles a week, so
    >> the legs aren't too bad.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can get?
    >
    >For £100 you will get something that might last until you get home, if you are lucky. You might get
    >more reliability from a bike from your local tip.

    I was asked by a girlfriend of a friend to sort her out with a bike to replace her ancient machine.
    She had a limit of a hundred and I told her she could always go to Halfords and walk out with a new
    bike for that money, rather than pay me to work on something secondhand, but she wasn't really that
    bothered and still wanted me to do it, so I went down to the local tip, picked up a 21 speed
    mountain bike for £15, quite old, bit of surface rust and wheels hanging off. Got it home, spent 2
    hours 'working on it' - replacing spokes, cleaning, lubing..etc and sold it on for £35. It rides
    fine, brakes ok and has some nicely working grip-shifters. She was chuffed to bits.

    The stuff that gets dumped..

    You might not want to do that, but if you're happy using a spanner, then the stuff you can buy
    secondhand gives you loads of scope.

    GarryB

    >Best to look for a secondhand bike - shop windows, and other usual places.
    >
    >John B
     
  18. Budgie

    Budgie Guest

    "Budgie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    | Any suggestions for a light hybrid-style bike as near to £100 as I can
    get?

    Thanks for all suggestions - looks like 2nd-hand!!

    Budgie

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 18/09/2003
     
  19. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    the Baker-Bealls <[email protected]> wrote:

    : better ones. I think the other thing the OP needs to look at is the cost of other sports equipment
    : e.g walking boots or running shoes by which time £200-250 is going to look astonishing value for a
    : new bicycle.

    You've got to be careful though - I've just spent £150 on some bike lights :)

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Techolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  20. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > the Baker-Bealls <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : better ones. I think the other thing the OP needs to look at is the cost of other sports
    > : equipment e.g walking boots or running shoes by which time £200-250 is going to look astonishing
    > : value for a new bicycle.
    >
    > You've got to be careful though - I've just spent £150 on some bike lights :)
    >

    You skinflint.

    Wiggle have the Lupine Edison 10 at 10% off the £598.99 price tag.

    John B
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...