New book coming! "The Folding Bike"!!!

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Jeff Potter, Apr 18, 2003.

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  1. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    I'm wrapping up a new book for this spring, tentatively titled "The Folding Bicycle."

    It'll be the first book covering the complete world of the folding bike, its history, development,
    variants, shopping details, pros'n'cons, racing, touring, political issues. The works!

    It's by Gunnar Fehlau and first came out in German. It's gorgeous. Now it'll be updated and
    in English!

    NOTE: IF YOU HAVE ANY FOLDING BIKE NEWS OR DETAILS FEEL FREE TO LET ME KNOW. The more the merrier.
    We want it to be as complete and up-to-date as possible.

    --

    Jeff Potter [email protected] http://OutYourBackdoor.com -- a friendly ezine of modern
    folkways and culture revival...offering a line of alternative books and a world of bikes, boats,
    skis...plus shops for great sleeper books, videos and music ...plus nationwide "Off the Beaten Path"
    travel forums for local fun, bumperstickers and a new social magnet stickers! ...Holy Smokes!!!
     
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  2. On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 12:42:53 -0400, Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm wrapping up a new book for this spring, tentatively titled "The Folding Bicycle."

    Cool, I'll look forward to it. Folding bikes are all the rage in Japan
    - I see the R&M Birdy everywhere I go. There are some interesting ones made in Japan as well, which
    I hope you will mention - the Panasonic Traincle titanium folder and the Tartaruga semi-recumbent
    folder being the most notable. There's also a new bike called the MC-1 which is quietly attracting
    attention. I don't even know who makes it but here are some photos:

    http://www1.neweb.ne.jp/wa/kaz-taguch/mc-1.htm

    Even if you didn't know about it, you probably have the resources to find out more about it. The
    notable feature is that both wheels turn freely when folded, allowing you to push the bike like a
    dolly. I believe it even disengages the chain.

    Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
     
  3. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    Thanks, I personally think the Dahon Helios is the cat's meow. 20 pounds and $750 are a great combo
    for ANY bike. I think it has great polish and elegant styling as well. Brompton still my fave fold
    action, though. But times change, so thanks for your further input!

    Ken Kobayashi wrote:

    > On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 12:42:53 -0400, Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm wrapping up a new book for this spring, tentatively titled "The Folding Bicycle."
    >
    > Cool, I'll look forward to it. Folding bikes are all the rage in Japan
    > - I see the R&M Birdy everywhere I go. There are some interesting ones made in Japan as well,
    > which I hope you will mention - the Panasonic Traincle titanium folder and the Tartaruga
    > semi-recumbent folder being the most notable. There's also a new bike called the MC-1 which is
    > quietly attracting attention. I don't even know who makes it but here are some photos:
    >
    > http://www1.neweb.ne.jp/wa/kaz-taguch/mc-1.htm
    >
    > Even if you didn't know about it, you probably have the resources to find out more about it. The
    > notable feature is that both wheels turn freely when folded, allowing you to push the bike like a
    > dolly. I believe it even disengages the chain.
    >
    > Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/

    --

    Jeff Potter [email protected] http://OutYourBackdoor.com -- a friendly ezine of modern
    folkways and culture revival...offering a line of alternative books and a world of bikes, boats,
    skis...plus shops for great sleeper books, videos and music

    ...plus nationwide "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums for local fun, bumperstickers and a new
    social magnet stickers! ...Holy Smokes!!!
     
  4. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    PS: Very cool! A dolly plus a seat plus a compact fold! Now, if the fold-action is seamless/flowing
    and the bike is light, then we got a real winner!

    Ken Kobayashi wrote:

    > [ ] There's also a new bike called the MC-1 which is quietly attracting attention. I don't even
    > know who makes it but here are some photos:
    >
    > http://www1.neweb.ne.jp/wa/kaz-taguch/mc-1.htm

    --

    Jeff Potter [email protected] http://OutYourBackdoor.com -- a friendly ezine of modern
    folkways and culture revival...offering a line of alternative books and a world of bikes, boats,
    skis...plus shops for great sleeper books, videos and music

    ...plus nationwide "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums for local fun, bumperstickers and a new
    social magnet stickers! ...Holy Smokes!!!
     
  5. Greg Dunn

    Greg Dunn Guest

    What about the Strida? I've never seen one in person, but from the pictures it looks like the
    folding action could hardly be improved upon.

    --
    Greg Dunn

    "Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks, I personally think the Dahon Helios is the cat's meow. 20 pounds and $750 are a great
    > combo for ANY bike. I think it has great polish and elegant styling as well. Brompton still my
    > fave fold action, though. But times change, so thanks for your further input!
    >
    > Ken Kobayashi wrote:
    >
    > > On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 12:42:53 -0400, Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >I'm wrapping up a new book for this spring, tentatively titled "The Folding Bicycle."
    > >
    > > Cool, I'll look forward to it. Folding bikes are all the rage in Japan
    > > - I see the R&M Birdy everywhere I go. There are some interesting ones made in Japan as well,
    > > which I hope you will mention - the Panasonic Traincle titanium folder and the Tartaruga
    > > semi-recumbent folder being the most notable. There's also a new bike called the MC-1 which is
    > > quietly attracting attention. I don't even know who makes it but here are some photos:
    > >
    > > http://www1.neweb.ne.jp/wa/kaz-taguch/mc-1.htm
    > >
    > > Even if you didn't know about it, you probably have the resources to find out more about it. The
    > > notable feature is that both wheels turn freely when folded, allowing you to push the bike like
    > > a dolly. I believe it even disengages the chain.
    > >
    > > Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
    >
    > --
    >
    > Jeff Potter [email protected] http://OutYourBackdoor.com -- a friendly ezine of modern
    > folkways and culture revival...offering a line of alternative books and a world of bikes, boats,
    > skis...plus shops for great sleeper books, videos and music
    >
    > ...plus nationwide "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums for local fun, bumperstickers and a new
    > social magnet stickers! ...Holy Smokes!!!
     
  6. Greg Dunn wrote:

    > What about the Strida? I've never seen one in person, but from the pictures it looks like the
    > folding action could hardly be improved upon.

    It's true that the Strida's folding action is rather nifty, but as a bicycle its performance appears
    to leave something to be desired. Like the ability to be ridden in a straight line without the rider
    having to hang on like grim death. I've seen a few examples around London, and none has had its
    wheels pointing in the right direction. I see a *lot* of Bromptons, which fold small and work fairly
    well as bicycles too.

    If you want a bicycle, buy a bicycle. If you want something that folds, buy a deckchair ;-)

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  7. Greg Dunn

    Greg Dunn Guest

    Actually, I have a really nifty deck chair already, so maybe I'll look into putting rollers
    on it. :cool:

    http://www.foldingrecliners.com/recliners.php?cat=6

    --
    Greg Dunn www.BicycleCommuter.com

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Greg Dunn wrote:
    >
    > > What about the Strida? I've never seen one in person, but from the pictures it looks like the
    > > folding action could hardly be improved upon.
    >
    > It's true that the Strida's folding action is rather nifty, but as a
    bicycle
    > its performance appears to leave something to be desired. Like the
    ability
    > to be ridden in a straight line without the rider having to hang on like grim death. I've seen a
    > few examples around London, and none has had its wheels pointing in the right direction. I see a
    > *lot* of Bromptons, which fold small and work fairly well as bicycles too.
    >
    > If you want a bicycle, buy a bicycle. If you want something that folds,
    buy
    > a deckchair ;-)
    >
    > Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    > ===========================================================
    > Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    > http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    > ===========================================================
     
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