New brake won't stop slipping!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Colin B., Apr 1, 2006.

  1. Colin B.

    Colin B. Guest

    Hey folks;

    Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a single pull
    of the brakes.

    The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are teflon-coated
    Nervz.

    Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the anchor
    surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.

    Thanks,
    Colin
     
    Tags:


  2. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    Colin B. wrote:
    > Hey folks;
    >
    > Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    > bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    > anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    > I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a single pull
    > of the brakes.
    >
    > The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are teflon-coated
    > Nervz.
    >
    > Any suggestions here?


    yes, don't use teflon coated cable! also, be sure you have the pressure
    block on the correct way around.

    > I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the anchor
    > surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Colin
    >
     
  3. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hey folks;
    >
    >Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    >bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    >anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    >I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a single pull
    >of the brakes.
    >
    >The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are teflon-coated
    >Nervz.
    >
    >Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the anchor
    >surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Colin


    Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  4. Lou Holtman

    Lou Holtman Guest

    Jeff Starr wrote:
    > On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hey folks;
    >>
    >>Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    >>bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    >>anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    >>I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a single pull
    >>of the brakes.
    >>
    >>The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are teflon-coated
    >>Nervz.
    >>
    >>Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the anchor
    >>surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>
    >>Thanks,
    >>Colin

    >
    >
    > Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    > roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    > mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.


    Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt. It
    has no use there.

    Lou
    --
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu
     
  5. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    Lou Holtman wrote:
    > Jeff Starr wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Hey folks;
    >>>
    >>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    >>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    >>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    >>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>> single pull
    >>> of the brakes.
    >>>
    >>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>> teflon-coated
    >>> Nervz.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the
    >>> anchor
    >>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Colin

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.

    >
    >
    > Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt. It
    > has no use there.
    >
    > Lou


    hard to do without risking cable softening [and the health risks of
    toxic vapor ingestion] - caught between a rock & a hard place. best to
    not use teflon cable at all.
     
  6. Lou Holtman

    Lou Holtman Guest

    jim beam wrote:
    > Lou Holtman wrote:
    >
    >> Jeff Starr wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Hey folks;
    >>>>
    >>>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    >>>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    >>>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor
    >>>> pressure.
    >>>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>>> single pull
    >>>> of the brakes.
    >>>>
    >>>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>>> teflon-coated
    >>>> Nervz.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the
    >>>> anchor
    >>>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> Colin
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >>> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >>> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt. It
    >> has no use there.
    >>
    >> Lou

    >
    >
    > hard to do without risking cable softening [and the health risks of
    > toxic vapor ingestion] - caught between a rock & a hard place.


    It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB. Just
    used a cigarette lighter and hold my breath for a couple of seconds.

    > best to not use teflon cable at all.


    I agree.

    Lou
    --
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu
     
  7. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    Lou Holtman wrote:
    > jim beam wrote:
    >
    >> Lou Holtman wrote:
    >>
    >>> Jeff Starr wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Hey folks;
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient
    >>>>> road
    >>>>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back
    >>>>> brake
    >>>>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor
    >>>>> pressure.
    >>>>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>>>> single pull
    >>>>> of the brakes.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>>>> teflon-coated
    >>>>> Nervz.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the
    >>>>> anchor
    >>>>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>> Colin
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >>>> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >>>> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt.
    >>> It has no use there.
    >>>
    >>> Lou

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> hard to do without risking cable softening [and the health risks of
    >> toxic vapor ingestion] - caught between a rock & a hard place.

    >
    >
    > It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB. Just
    > used a cigarette lighter


    so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to burn
    off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if it's
    beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but here,
    the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.

    > and hold my breath for a couple of seconds.
    >
    >> best to not use teflon cable at all.

    >
    >
    > I agree.
    >
    > Lou
     
  8. Lou Holtman

    Lou Holtman Guest

    jim beam wrote:
    > Lou Holtman wrote:
    >
    >> jim beam wrote:
    >>
    >>> Lou Holtman wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Jeff Starr wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >>>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Hey folks;
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient
    >>>>>> road
    >>>>>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back
    >>>>>> brake
    >>>>>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor
    >>>>>> pressure.
    >>>>>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>>>>> single pull
    >>>>>> of the brakes.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>>>>> teflon-coated
    >>>>>> Nervz.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on
    >>>>>> the anchor
    >>>>>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>> Colin
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >>>>> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >>>>> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt.
    >>>> It has no use there.
    >>>>
    >>>> Lou
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> hard to do without risking cable softening [and the health risks of
    >>> toxic vapor ingestion] - caught between a rock & a hard place.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB.
    >> Just used a cigarette lighter

    >
    >
    > so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to burn
    > off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if it's
    > beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but here,
    > the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.



    To be honest I didn't test it. As I said it was a derailleur cable and
    the pulling forces aren't that high. Maybe it isn't a good idea for a
    brake cable. Good point. So the OP better remove the teflon coating with
    a hobby knife.

    Lou
    --
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu
     
  9. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    Lou Holtman wrote:
    > jim beam wrote:
    >
    >> Lou Holtman wrote:
    >>
    >>> jim beam wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Lou Holtman wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Jeff Starr wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >>>>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Hey folks;
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my
    >>>>>>> ancient road
    >>>>>>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back
    >>>>>>> brake
    >>>>>>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor
    >>>>>>> pressure.
    >>>>>>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>>>>>> single pull
    >>>>>>> of the brakes.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>>>>>> teflon-coated
    >>>>>>> Nervz.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on
    >>>>>>> the anchor
    >>>>>>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>>> Colin
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >>>>>> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >>>>>> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt.
    >>>>> It has no use there.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Lou
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> hard to do without risking cable softening [and the health risks of
    >>>> toxic vapor ingestion] - caught between a rock & a hard place.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB.
    >>> Just used a cigarette lighter

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to
    >> burn off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if
    >> it's beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but
    >> here, the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.

    >
    >
    >
    > To be honest I didn't test it. As I said it was a derailleur cable and
    > the pulling forces aren't that high. Maybe it isn't a good idea for a
    > brake cable. Good point. So the OP better remove the teflon coating with
    > a hobby knife.
    >
    > Lou


    yes, derailleur is much less of a problem.

    believe it or not though, the knife thing is not a great idea! it'll
    end up scratching the strand surfaces which can initiate fatigue. if i
    were the o.p., i'd look for some clamping assembly problem. i've used
    teflon coated cable in the past and experienced no slippage issues, so
    while i don't think it's great idea, i do know that it works. if teflon
    is to be the magic bullet, it needs to be in the liner, not coating the
    cable.
     
  10. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Lou Holtman wrote:
    > Jeff Starr wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Hey folks;
    >>>
    >>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    >>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    >>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    >>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>> single pull
    >>> of the brakes.
    >>>
    >>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>> teflon-coated
    >>> Nervz.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the
    >>> anchor
    >>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Colin

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.

    >
    >
    > Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt. It
    > has no use there.


    I don't get it. I know I have a bad tendency to over-tighten things,
    but the brake cable clamps I can remember physically deform the cable,
    so that it is mechanically restrained from slipping. Maybe I'm just
    remembering the old center-pull and canti cable clamps.

    I suspect a washer or some such has been mislaid, which would provide
    the "pinch" I mention above. Certainly worth checking into.

    Mark
     
  11. Mark Janeba wrote:
    > Lou Holtman wrote:
    >> Jeff Starr wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Hey folks;
    >>>>
    >>>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient
    >>>> road bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the
    >>>> back brake anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under
    >>>> very minor pressure. I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and
    >>>> the cable slips on a single pull
    >>>> of the brakes.
    >>>>
    >>>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>>> teflon-coated
    >>>> Nervz.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the
    >>>> anchor
    >>>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> Colin
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >>> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >>> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.

    >>
    >>
    >> Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt.
    >> It has no use there.

    >
    > I don't get it. I know I have a bad tendency to over-tighten things,
    > but the brake cable clamps I can remember physically deform the cable,
    > so that it is mechanically restrained from slipping. Maybe I'm just
    > remembering the old center-pull and canti cable clamps.
    >
    > I suspect a washer or some such has been mislaid, which would provide
    > the "pinch" I mention above. Certainly worth checking into.


    Yes, this is the exact problem I had with my old SLRs and one of the primary
    reasons that I dispensed with single-pivot brakes. The cable must be
    pinched between two *steel* surfaces. If you have a missing washer, it's
    easy to get the cable pinched between steel and aluminum or
    aluminum/aluminum. This would most definitely cause slippage.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  12. jtaylor

    jtaylor Guest

    "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > > It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB. Just
    > > used a cigarette lighter

    >
    > so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to burn
    > off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if it's
    > beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but here,
    > the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.
    >


    No.

    Typical teflon melting points are in the neighbourhood of 300 degrees
    Celcius. It is unlikely that typical steels wil "soften" at such low
    temperatures (4130 for example needs something over 800 degrees Celcius, and
    that usually for an extended period of time).
     
  13. Colin B.

    Colin B. Guest

    jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Lou Holtman wrote:
    >> jim beam wrote:
    >>
    >>> Lou Holtman wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> jim beam wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Lou Holtman wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Jeff Starr wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    >>>>>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Hey folks;
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my
    >>>>>>>> ancient road
    >>>>>>>> bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back
    >>>>>>>> brake
    >>>>>>>> anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor
    >>>>>>>> pressure.
    >>>>>>>> I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a
    >>>>>>>> single pull
    >>>>>>>> of the brakes.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are
    >>>>>>>> teflon-coated
    >>>>>>>> Nervz.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on
    >>>>>>>> the anchor
    >>>>>>>> surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>>>> Colin
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Hi, without damaging the actual cable, you might try removing, or
    >>>>>>> roughing up the teflon surface. Try some steel wool. Also, not the
    >>>>>>> mating surfaces, but the bolt itself should be greased.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Burn of the teflon on the part of the cable that is under the bolt.
    >>>>>> It has no use there.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Lou
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> hard to do without risking cable softening [and the health risks of
    >>>>> toxic vapor ingestion] - caught between a rock & a hard place.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB.
    >>>> Just used a cigarette lighter
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to
    >>> burn off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if
    >>> it's beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but
    >>> here, the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> To be honest I didn't test it. As I said it was a derailleur cable and
    >> the pulling forces aren't that high. Maybe it isn't a good idea for a
    >> brake cable. Good point. So the OP better remove the teflon coating with
    >> a hobby knife.
    >>
    >> Lou

    >
    > yes, derailleur is much less of a problem.
    >
    > believe it or not though, the knife thing is not a great idea! it'll
    > end up scratching the strand surfaces which can initiate fatigue. if i
    > were the o.p., i'd look for some clamping assembly problem. i've used
    > teflon coated cable in the past and experienced no slippage issues, so
    > while i don't think it's great idea, i do know that it works. if teflon
    > is to be the magic bullet, it needs to be in the liner, not coating the
    > cable.


    Thanks to all. I scraped the teflon off, and then roughed up the surface of
    the cable. It's true that this can weaken the cable, but if that's the only
    way I can get it to clamp properly, then so be it.

    As an aside, I took a good look at the pinch-clamp washer. It has a groove
    for the cable to sit into, and in that groove are two pins which are
    presumably there to hold the cable tight. Those pins are worn down to
    about nothing, so the cable is free to ride in the groove. Looks like I need
    to get some more new bits now.

    Thanks,
    Colin
     
  14. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    "jtaylor" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > > It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB. Just
    > > > used a cigarette lighter

    > >
    > > so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to burn
    > > off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if it's
    > > beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but here,
    > > the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.
    > >

    >
    > No.
    >
    > Typical teflon melting points are in the neighbourhood of 300 degrees
    > Celcius. It is unlikely that typical steels wil "soften" at such low
    > temperatures (4130 for example needs something over 800 degrees Celcius, and
    > that usually for an extended period of time).




    That's "Celsius". My God, the disinformation here is astounding.



    (Just a little joke, no need for firing off an angry reply.)
    I think Jim meant that much lower temperatures than the "softening"
    temperature will alter the structure of the steel for the worse.

    --
    Ted Bennett
     
  15. jtaylor

    jtaylor Guest

    "Ted Bennett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "jtaylor" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > > > It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB.

    Just
    > > > > used a cigarette lighter
    > > >
    > > > so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to

    burn
    > > > off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if it's
    > > > beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but

    here,
    > > > the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.
    > > >

    > >
    > > No.
    > >
    > > Typical teflon melting points are in the neighbourhood of 300 degrees
    > > Celcius. It is unlikely that typical steels wil "soften" at such low
    > > temperatures (4130 for example needs something over 800 degrees Celcius,

    and
    > > that usually for an extended period of time).

    >
    >
    >
    > That's "Celsius". My God, the disinformation here is astounding.
    >
    >
    >
    > (Just a little joke, no need for firing off an angry reply.)
    > I think Jim meant that much lower temperatures than the "softening"
    > temperature will alter the structure of the steel for the worse.


    By "softening" I did assume that jim "I used to be a metalurgist, but now
    I'm an anonymous jerk on the net" beam DID mean annealing; which DOES
    require the 800 degrees indicated above.
     
  16. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:42:53 GMT, "Colin B."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hey folks;
    >
    >Just put new brake cables, levers, and cable housing on my ancient road
    >bike. Everything went fine, except that I cannot tighten the back brake
    >anchor enough to keep the cable from slipping under very minor pressure.
    >I mean, I've tightened that bolt HARD, and the cable slips on a single pull
    >of the brakes.
    >
    >The brakes themselves are old Shimano SLRs, and the cables are teflon-coated
    >Nervz.
    >
    >Any suggestions here? I'm thinking of putting contact cement on the anchor
    >surface and the cable, but I don't know if that'll help or not.


    Does the bolt have a square shoulder on it? If so, I suspect that
    it's rotated a little off from the correct alignment, and become
    jammed in the hole.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
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  17. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    jtaylor wrote:
    > "Ted Bennett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>"jtaylor" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"jim beam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>It was quit easy with my teflon coated derailleur cables on my ATB.

    >
    > Just
    >
    >>>>>used a cigarette lighter
    >>>>
    >>>>so did the steel soften? or did you not test? the temperature to

    >
    > burn
    >
    >>>>off teflon is high enough for this to be a factor. it's fine if it's
    >>>>beyond the anchor point like the soldered end debate earlier, but

    >
    > here,
    >
    >>>>the affected area is load bearing. i definitely wouldn't do it.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>No.
    >>>
    >>>Typical teflon melting points are in the neighbourhood of 300 degrees
    >>>Celcius. It is unlikely that typical steels wil "soften" at such low
    >>>temperatures (4130 for example needs something over 800 degrees Celcius,

    >
    > and
    >
    >>>that usually for an extended period of time).

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>That's "Celsius". My God, the disinformation here is astounding.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>(Just a little joke, no need for firing off an angry reply.)
    >>I think Jim meant that much lower temperatures than the "softening"
    >>temperature will alter the structure of the steel for the worse.

    >
    >
    > By "softening" I did assume that jim "I used to be a metalurgist, but now
    > I'm an anonymous jerk on the net" beam DID mean annealing; which DOES
    > require the 800 degrees indicated above.
    >

    martensitic steels. look them up.
     
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