New carbon fairing for GRR-type LWB

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Nathan Congdon, Aug 7, 2003.

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  1. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    skip wrote:
    >
    > Whatever. Aren't fairing pretty much useless in urban riding? Unless of course they happened to be
    > bulletproof which they aren't.

    Mine has deflected a convenience store cup full of ice and a partially full soft drink can while
    riding in urban areas.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     


  2. Bentnut

    Bentnut Guest

    I'm glad that you two "made up" just be aware how your comments may sound to the casual un-informed
    reader. I will make a herculean effort to keep my foot out of my mouth in the future :)

    "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Gabriel Guess you and Fast Freddy ain't communicating too often. He and I kissed
    and
    > made up months ago. My periodic references to Fast Freddy are done in jest...I figure he knows
    > that to be the case.
    >
    > As for the fairing...if it works I'll seriously consider buying one with
    the
    > $1,000. from you know who.
    >
    > I have had a Windwrap fairing on a LWB and I coated it in Mylar Film. The kind people use on Van
    > windows re: they can see out/you can't see in.
    Looked
    > really cool having a Silver Mirror Fairing, blinded the crap out of car drivers using their
    > Hi-Beams and no I didn't do it for that reason. I did
    it
    > to prevent gravel dinging the Lexan...much more cost effective to peel off $30.00 of Mylar, than
    > to replace the fairing every 6 months.
    >
    > Anyway one of the downsides to the Mirrored Mylar was it greatly reduced
    my
    > ability to see where the f**k I was going and I ride with prescirption sunglasses on...making a
    > bad situation worse. I was riding and my 20 inch front wheel went into an open sewer grate...which
    > I did not see fast
    enough
    > BECAUSE my lower section of the fairing was NOT Clear. I was okay but the Stratus and Fairing
    > was toast.
    >
    > As I said, I want to read some ride reports from people who buy and ride with the CF Fairing. I am
    > NOT attacking the design and I still hope everything works out well for Fast Freddy.
    >
    > As for you.....well what can I say Gabriel beyond "Get over it", Freddy
    and
    > I did along time ago.
    > ************************************************************************
    >
    > "Gabriel DeVault" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    > > "Ain't going to attack the fairing till I see how it works...not making
    > THAT
    > > mistake again."
    > >
    > > Gee, that's a novel concept, don't kock it 'till you try it, sounds familiar. I think it's
    > > rediculous to make any blanket statements
    regarding
    > > safety, visabilty, etc... about a carbon fairing. It's going to be set
    up
    > > differently on almost every bike. Sitting on a M/L Gold Rush with a body sock installed I can
    > > see the ground approximately 5 feet directly in
    front
    > > of the bike, and of course to the sides even closer. There is no way a
    kid
    > > or dog could just appear in the "very small" blindspot. There are many
    > other
    > > bikes with bigger "blind spots", like a faired F-40 even some low
    racers,
    > > and I have never once heard any complaints about visability. Making mountains out of mole-hills
    > > as far as I see it.
    > >
    > > What is your beef with Freddy anyways? Anytime his name is mentioned you have to chime in with
    > > some negative comment.
    > >
    > > Get over it.
    > >
    > > "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I smell a Trap here with my name on it and Fast Freddy and the guy in Minnesota just waiting
    > > > for me to put my foot in it....soooo tempting.
    > > >
    > > > IF anyone buys this fairing and uses it on a LWB or CLWB...I'd love to
    > > hear
    > > > about how it works out...in particular for seeing what is close and in
    > > front
    > > > of you...like a small dog or a kid running into your path from the
    right
    > > > side.....like from between parked cars.
    > > >
    > > > Ain't going to attack the fairing till I see how it works...not making
    > > THAT
    > > > mistake again.
    > > > -----------------------------------------------------
    > > > "Nathan Congdon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > There have been several threads on the new Calfee carbon fairing for GRR-type bikes
    > > > > (ultimately for Calfee's as-yet unavailable
    Stiletto).
    > > > > The big concern seems to have been that having made the thing black will lead to poor
    > > > > straight-ahead visibility, accidents, end of life
    as
    > > > > we know it, etc. I haven't followed the threads all the way thru,
    but
    > > > > I'm not sure if it has been posted that they have a "double bubble" model which is carbon
    > > > > with a smaller inset Lexan bit at the top thru which you can see. Lexan part comes in red,
    > > > > blue,clear or "smoke." The pure carbon is available now for $499, the double bubble will be
    > > > > selling in a couple of weeks for $625. Advantages are meant to be weight (pure carbon 15 oz
    > > > > versus 2.5 lb for the heavy super zzipper that you need for a body sock; double bubble about
    > > > > 1.5 lb due to extra hardware to accommodate the "bubble.") Also, both models eliminate the
    > > > > "growling" road noise that you get with the Lexan.
    And,
    > > > > of course, the cool factor. You can see both (sort of) at:
    > > > >
    > > > > www.ffmcycling.com
    > > > >
    > > > > The blue paint on the double bubble seen on the website will not be there on the final
    > > > > production version.
    > > > >
    > > > > The above info is from Fast Freddy, whom I spoke with just now about these. Also, he says he
    > > > > has used a carbon fairing for about 5 yrs, and estimates it will last 3X longer than the
    > > > > Lexan, but of course YMMV.
    > > > >
    > > > > I don't sell any of this stuff, work for Calfee, etc., etc. But a more durable and quieter
    > > > > fairing sounds appealing. I think it's
    $379
    > > > > for the heavy Super Zzipper, so not a huge price differential,
    though
    > > > > certainly not cheap.
    > > > >
    > > > > Nathan
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  3. Skip

    Skip Guest

    "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > skip wrote:
    > >
    > > Whatever. Aren't fairing pretty much useless in urban riding? Unless
    of
    > > course they happened to be bulletproof which they aren't.
    >
    > Mine has deflected a convenience store cup full of ice and a partially full soft drink can while
    > riding in urban areas.
    >
    Sounds as if they thought it was Dr. Pepper time for you. As I recollect it was Mr. Huffman who
    posted some suggestions for nipping this crap in the bud.

    skip
     
  4. On Fri, 8 Aug 2003 19:53:07 -0500, "skip" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Whatever. Aren't fairing pretty much useless in urban riding? Unless of course they happened to be
    >bulletproof which they aren't.

    Bulletproof windows and bike fairings are actually made of the same material, Lexan. There's a big
    difference in thickness, but a bike fairing would probably stop an air gun pellet.

    Lexan is wonderful stuff. In my last job I learned that a 0.6-micron thick Lexan film can withstand
    the vibration from a Space Shuttle launch. (I worked on calibrating an aluminized Lexan filter for
    an orbital X-ray telescope.)

    Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
     
  5. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    Ken Kobayashi wrote:
    > Lexan is wonderful stuff. In my last job I learned that a 0.6-micron thick Lexan film can
    > withstand the vibration from a Space Shuttle launch. (I worked on calibrating an aluminized Lexan
    > filter for an orbital X-ray telescope.)

    Would that be the "transparent aluminum" of Star Trek IV fame? :)

    As for their usefulness in urban riding, I suppose a fairing could be useful in rainy climates.
    Those potholes can make for might annoying splashes.

    --
    I do not accept unsolicted commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for legitimate replies.
     
  6. "Victor Kan" skrev

    > As for their usefulness in urban riding, I suppose a fairing could be useful in rainy climates.
    > Those potholes can make for might annoying splashes.

    Hmm. Dont think a fariring would help much actually. Most I know are mounted so the rear of your
    frontwheel is behind the fairing so you'd still get to enjoy the splash without fenders. They keep
    your legs dry up to the knees if lucky when it rains. :)

    My fairing is nice in headwinds even though it just means getting to the next red light faster and
    with less effort.

    Regards Mikael
     
  7. skip wrote:

    > Whatever. Aren't fairing pretty much useless in urban riding? Unless of course they happened to be
    > bulletproof which they aren't.

    I ride with traffic. That means I must be able to maintain 30+ mph speeds while surrounded by cars.
    Also, even when the traffic is light, the speed of the green-wave is 30mph. So I still want to go
    that fast in order to avoid red lights.
     
  8. Skip

    Skip Guest

    "Joao de Souza" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > skip wrote:
    >
    > > Whatever. Aren't fairing pretty much useless in urban riding? Unless
    of
    > > course they happened to be bulletproof which they aren't.
    >
    > I ride with traffic. That means I must be able to maintain 30+ mph speeds while surrounded by
    > cars. Also, even when the traffic is light, the speed of the green-wave is 30mph. So I still want
    > to go that fast in order to avoid red lights.
    >

    Pedal on Joao. Watch out for the cabbies.

    skip
     
  9. What Jeff said. I used mine for a Several of years commuting into central London. Which the extra
    mass made it a little more sluggish off the line, and the extra length a little more difficult to
    weave around stationary tin boxes, overall the trade-off was worth it.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  10. Joeg

    Joeg Guest

    I agree - the only time the fairing on my GRR is not worth the weight is when climbing mountain
    passes; and it's close, even then.

    I would say it is most useful for urban riding; which is mostly all I do - it keeps the rain off.

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What Jeff said. I used mine for a Several of years commuting into central London. Which the extra
    > mass made it a little more sluggish off the line, and the extra length a little more difficult to
    > weave around stationary
    tin
    > boxes, overall the trade-off was worth it.
    >
    > Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    > ===========================================================
    > Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    > http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    > ===========================================================
     
  11. Chere

    Chere Guest

    I have the notion that the fairing on my GRR will assist in the event of a head-on with another
    rider. Sanibel bike paths (yes, I ride the path as there are too many "blind", inconsiderate drivers
    in our neck of FL) are loaded with cyclists who think they're the only ones in existence. I've had
    the misfortune of a run-in on a d/f years ago and MANY close calls on my 'bent. It's my belief the
    Kevlar between me and anything "incoming" may prevent a puncture wound or at least lessen the
    severity of injury in the event of a crash; a sort of "shield" if you will. Here's hoping I don't
    have to find out.

    --
    Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
     
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