New chain grease no good

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jim, Mar 26, 2006.

  1. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Good evening,

    I recently replaced the front chain on my Rotator Pursuit recumbent.
    Based on the length it was marginal; the rear chain was OK.

    The chain is 1.5 SRAM PC-58's in the original unopened packaging from
    a Bike Nashbar "sale" several months ago. In case you're wondering,
    it takes 3 chains to replace everything on a Pursuit.

    I installed it without degreasing/relubing as I used to. Saw the new
    chain grease thread here and decided to go for it.

    I go out on a ride, shifting is much improved and I am happy knowing
    it has the best lubrication it ever will have. It was a dry day, no
    water on the roads. Get home, put it in its usual place in garage and
    don't ride it for a week due to weather, work, etc.

    When I came out yesterday the front chain was covered in rust. What's
    the deal? The old back chain (cleaned/lubed as always) was OK.

    Thanks,
    Jim
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > Good evening,
    >
    > I recently replaced the front chain on my Rotator Pursuit recumbent.
    > Based on the length it was marginal; the rear chain was OK.
    >
    > The chain is 1.5 SRAM PC-58's in the original unopened packaging from
    > a Bike Nashbar "sale" several months ago. In case you're wondering,
    > it takes 3 chains to replace everything on a Pursuit.
    >
    > I installed it without degreasing/relubing as I used to. Saw the new
    > chain grease thread here and decided to go for it.
    >
    > I go out on a ride, shifting is much improved and I am happy knowing
    > it has the best lubrication it ever will have. It was a dry day, no
    > water on the roads. Get home, put it in its usual place in garage and
    > don't ride it for a week due to weather, work, etc.
    >
    > When I came out yesterday the front chain was covered in rust. What's
    > the deal? The old back chain (cleaned/lubed as always) was OK.


    One of my buddies who, even though he owns four hi-end road bikes, is
    clueless about bike maintenence, was complaining that his new Record
    chain was not shifting properly. He took the bike to the LBS where the
    mechanic informed him that the "wax" that comes on a new chain was the
    source of the problem. Then (without cleaning the chain) the mechanic
    squirted some ProLink on the chain and the "shifting problem"
    dissapeared.
    I didn't ask, but I wonder how much they charged him for that.
    What I do is flush a brand new chain with two rinses of lacquer thinner
    (which I decant and reuse), air dry the chain, install it on the bike,
    apply ProLink, and wipe off the excess.
     
  3. 41

    41 Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > Good evening,
    >
    > I recently replaced the front chain on my Rotator Pursuit recumbent.
    > Based on the length it was marginal; the rear chain was OK.
    >
    > The chain is 1.5 SRAM PC-58's in the original unopened packaging from
    > a Bike Nashbar "sale" several months ago. In case you're wondering,
    > it takes 3 chains to replace everything on a Pursuit.
    >
    > I installed it without degreasing/relubing as I used to. Saw the new
    > chain grease thread here and decided to go for it.
    >
    > I go out on a ride, shifting is much improved and I am happy knowing
    > it has the best lubrication it ever will have. It was a dry day, no
    > water on the roads. Get home, put it in its usual place in garage and
    > don't ride it for a week due to weather, work, etc.
    >
    > When I came out yesterday the front chain was covered in rust. What's
    > the deal? The old back chain (cleaned/lubed as always) was OK.


    I assume from this that when you installed it, the chain had grease on
    it and wasn't dry. BUT: even bare metal with no lubricant whatsoever
    does not rust without the presence of moisture. Do you live in the
    tropics, or next to the salt spray of the ocean? If not, better check
    your garage for leaky pipes, or your children for sabotage. Perhaps
    your dog objected to the smell, and marked his territory? It's not the
    lubricant.
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > Good evening,
    >
    > I recently replaced the front chain on my Rotator Pursuit recumbent.
    > Based on the length it was marginal; the rear chain was OK.
    >
    > The chain is 1.5 SRAM PC-58's in the original unopened packaging from
    > a Bike Nashbar "sale" several months ago. In case you're wondering,
    > it takes 3 chains to replace everything on a Pursuit.
    >
    > I installed it without degreasing/relubing as I used to. Saw the new
    > chain grease thread here and decided to go for it.
    >
    > I go out on a ride, shifting is much improved and I am happy knowing
    > it has the best lubrication it ever will have. It was a dry day, no
    > water on the roads. Get home, put it in its usual place in garage and
    > don't ride it for a week due to weather, work, etc.
    >
    > When I came out yesterday the front chain was covered in rust. What's
    > the deal? The old back chain (cleaned/lubed as always) was OK.


    SRAM lube has been variable, IME. Some chains came with a goodly load of
    gunge (which doesn't need any further lube at all for a while), other
    times they've been almost dry.

    Anyway, lubricate with whatever you want now. The rust wouldn't have
    permanently damaged it. Those who store their bikes in drier places (like
    inside the house!) don't have to worry so much about corrosion, period, so
    the minimal lube isn't such a problem until doing long rides in the rain.

    ~PB
     
  5. "Pete Biggs" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Jim wrote:
    >> Good evening,
    >>
    >> I recently replaced the front chain on my Rotator Pursuit recumbent.
    >> Based on the length it was marginal; the rear chain was OK.
    >>
    >> The chain is 1.5 SRAM PC-58's in the original unopened packaging from
    >> a Bike Nashbar "sale" several months ago. In case you're wondering,
    >> it takes 3 chains to replace everything on a Pursuit.
    >>
    >> I installed it without degreasing/relubing as I used to. Saw the new
    >> chain grease thread here and decided to go for it.
    >>
    >> I go out on a ride, shifting is much improved and I am happy knowing
    >> it has the best lubrication it ever will have. It was a dry day, no
    >> water on the roads. Get home, put it in its usual place in garage and
    >> don't ride it for a week due to weather, work, etc.
    >>
    >> When I came out yesterday the front chain was covered in rust. What's
    >> the deal? The old back chain (cleaned/lubed as always) was OK.

    >
    > SRAM lube has been variable, IME. Some chains came with a goodly load of
    > gunge (which doesn't need any further lube at all for a while), other
    > times they've been almost dry.
    >
    > Anyway, lubricate with whatever you want now. The rust wouldn't have
    > permanently damaged it. Those who store their bikes in drier places (like
    > inside the house!) don't have to worry so much about corrosion, period, so
    > the minimal lube isn't such a problem until doing long rides in the rain.
    >
    > ~PB
    >
    >

    I'd have to ditto what PB stated, I bought a new chain and it was
    problimatical as to whether it was lubed well out of the box or not.
    That chain was a bit slotchy on the lube. I think it is worthwhile to check
    the chain close to ensure it is thouroughly sticky all over and not just on
    the ends, where you join the chain together.
    Now I usually give them a squirt from the chain lube can, just in case, even
    if they are new.
     
  6. Jim

    Jim Guest

    On Mon, 27 Mar 2006 05:30:03 -0600, "Earl Bollinger"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Pete Biggs" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >message news:[email protected]
    >> Jim wrote:
    >>> Good evening,
    >>>
    >>> I recently replaced the front chain on my Rotator Pursuit recumbent.
    >>> Based on the length it was marginal; the rear chain was OK.
    >>>
    >>> The chain is 1.5 SRAM PC-58's in the original unopened packaging from
    >>> a Bike Nashbar "sale" several months ago. In case you're wondering,
    >>> it takes 3 chains to replace everything on a Pursuit.
    >>>
    >>> I installed it without degreasing/relubing as I used to. Saw the new
    >>> chain grease thread here and decided to go for it.
    >>>
    >>> I go out on a ride, shifting is much improved and I am happy knowing
    >>> it has the best lubrication it ever will have. It was a dry day, no
    >>> water on the roads. Get home, put it in its usual place in garage and
    >>> don't ride it for a week due to weather, work, etc.
    >>>
    >>> When I came out yesterday the front chain was covered in rust. What's
    >>> the deal? The old back chain (cleaned/lubed as always) was OK.

    >>
    >> SRAM lube has been variable, IME. Some chains came with a goodly load of
    >> gunge (which doesn't need any further lube at all for a while), other
    >> times they've been almost dry.
    >>
    >> Anyway, lubricate with whatever you want now. The rust wouldn't have
    >> permanently damaged it. Those who store their bikes in drier places (like
    >> inside the house!) don't have to worry so much about corrosion, period, so
    >> the minimal lube isn't such a problem until doing long rides in the rain.
    >>
    >> ~PB
    >>
    >>

    >I'd have to ditto what PB stated, I bought a new chain and it was
    >problimatical as to whether it was lubed well out of the box or not.
    >That chain was a bit slotchy on the lube. I think it is worthwhile to check
    >the chain close to ensure it is thouroughly sticky all over and not just on
    >the ends, where you join the chain together.
    >Now I usually give them a squirt from the chain lube can, just in case, even
    >if they are new.
    >

    Makes sense to me. The earlier thread on new chains was apparently
    not quite 100%. The weather was dry while riding. Rotator Pursuits
    have two complete chains and the back one was fine.

    Jim
     
  7. 41

    41 Guest

    Jim wrote:

    > Makes sense to me. The earlier thread on new chains was apparently
    > not quite 10 0%. The weather was dry while riding. Rotator Pursuits
    > have two complete chains and the back one was fine.


    But you still haven't accounted for the fact that even dry metal with
    absolutely nothing on it is still going to require moisture to rust. S
     
  8. I don't know what it is they put on new chains, but it certainly isb't
    grease (which is slippery) or wax, which feels, well waxy. The goob tah
    comes with chains is goey and sticky,

    maybe it's honey?

    - -
    Comments and opinions compliments of,
    "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    My web Site:
    http://geocities.com/czcorner

    To E-mail me:
    ChrisZCorner "at" webtv "dot" net
     
  9. Jim

    Jim Guest

    On 29 Mar 2006 15:46:04 -0800, "41" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Jim wrote:
    >
    >> Makes sense to me. The earlier thread on new chains was apparently
    >> not quite 100%. The weather was dry while riding. Rotator Pursuits
    >> have two complete chains and the back one was fine.

    >
    >But you still haven't accounted for the fact that even dry metal with
    >absolutely nothing on it is still going to require moisture to rust. S


    Good question. There are large temperature swings, perhaps humid air
    or condensation. In any case the new front chain rusted, the back one
    didn't. That's the nice thing with a Rotator Pursuit: two separate
    chains giving two different results with two different treatments. It
    also has very wide range gearing and a comfy seat, but that's a topic
    for rec.bicycles.recumbent.

    Moral of the story: Clean/lube that new chain. This is the first one
    I used as-is and it is the first one to rust.

    Jim
     
  10. 41

    41 Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > On 29 Mar 2006 15:46:04 -0800, "41" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Jim wrote:
    > >
    > >> Makes sense to me. The earlier thread on new chains was apparently
    > >> not quite 100%. The weather was dry while riding. Rotator Pursuits
    > >> have two complete chains and the back one was fine.

    > >
    > >But you still haven't accounted for the fact that even dry metal with
    > >absolutely nothing on it is still going to require moisture to rust. S

    >
    > Good question. There are large temperature swings, perhaps humid air
    > or condensation. In any case the new front chain rusted, the back one
    > didn't. That's the nice thing with a Rotator Pursuit: two separate
    > chains giving two different results with two different treatments. It
    > also has very wide range gearing and a comfy seat, but that's a topic
    > for rec.bicycles.recumbent.
    >
    > Moral of the story: Clean/lube that new chain. This is the first one
    > I used as-is and it is the first one to rust.


    I and many others have experienced different stories many times and so
    come up with a different moral. I use my SRAM chains direct from the
    package, they are clearly full of lubricant, and they don't rust, even
    after I wash the bicycle with a bucket of soapy water. The manufacturer
    describes the lubricant they use (Gleitmo) and Gleitmo describes the
    lubricant they make, as described in the previous threads, and their
    descriptions are consistent with the experiences of myself and many
    others. Yours is the outlier.

    Have you ever considered the possibility that the chain was on sale
    precisely because it was not standard issue, i.e. perhaps a run that
    they didn't lubricate? Once the chain is assembled, it's impossible to
    lube it with grease; perhaps there was a run where they ran out of it
    and had to produce anyway. Since so many people are putting all that
    effort into taking off what they put all that effort into putting on, I
    can see how that production manager's decision could have been made
    easier.

    Just check the chain before you use it. If it hasn't been greased,
    you'll be able to tell.e
     
  11. Jim

    Jim Guest

    On 30 Mar 2006 06:45:44 -0800, "41" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Jim wrote:
    >> On 29 Mar 2006 15:46:04 -0800, "41" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >Jim wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Makes sense to me. The earlier thread on new chains was apparently
    >> >> not quite 100%. The weather was dry while riding. Rotator Pursuits
    >> >> have two complete chains and the back one was fine.
    >> >
    >> >But you still haven't accounted for the fact that even dry metal with
    >> >absolutely nothing on it is still going to require moisture to rust. S

    >>
    >> Good question. There are large temperature swings, perhaps humid air
    >> or condensation. In any case the new front chain rusted, the back one
    >> didn't. That's the nice thing with a Rotator Pursuit: two separate
    >> chains giving two different results with two different treatments. It
    >> also has very wide range gearing and a comfy seat, but that's a topic
    >> for rec.bicycles.recumbent.
    >>
    >> Moral of the story: Clean/lube that new chain. This is the first one
    >> I used as-is and it is the first one to rust.

    >
    >I and many others have experienced different stories many times and so
    >come up with a different moral. I use my SRAM chains direct from the
    >package, they are clearly full of lubricant, and they don't rust, even
    >after I wash the bicycle with a bucket of soapy water. The manufacturer
    >describes the lubricant they use (Gleitmo) and Gleitmo describes the
    >lubricant they make, as described in the previous threads, and their
    >descriptions are consistent with the experiences of myself and many
    >others. Yours is the outlier.
    >
    >Have you ever considered the possibility that the chain was on sale
    >precisely because it was not standard issue, i.e. perhaps a run that
    >they didn't lubricate? Once the chain is assembled, it's impossible to
    >lube it with grease; perhaps there was a run where they ran out of it
    >and had to produce anyway. Since so many people are putting all that
    >effort into taking off what they put all that effort into putting on, I
    >can see how that production manager's decision could have been made
    >easier.
    >
    >Just check the chain before you use it. If it hasn't been greased,
    >you'll be able to tell.e


    It was greased with something. Yellowish sticky stuff, sure seemed
    like grease. I only use SRAM chains, have had good luck with them. If
    they do production runs where something else is used then that's all
    the better reason to clean/lube before using. It's just not worth
    taking the chance.
     
  12. 41

    41 Guest

    Jim wrote:

    > It was greased with something. Yellowish sticky stuff, sure seemed
    > like grease.


    Grease to me is slippery, not sticky. I have never had a chain new from
    the package with anything remotely yellowish on it. I
     
  13. On 29 Mar 2006 15:46:04 -0800, "41" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >But you still haven't accounted for the fact that even dry metal with
    >absolutely nothing on it is still going to require moisture to rust. S


    What is water vapor in the air,Alex?

    Jasper
     
  14. 41

    41 Guest

    Jasper Janssen wrote:
    > On 29 Mar 2006 15:46:04 -0800, "41" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >But you still haven't accounted for the fact that even dry metal with
    > >absolutely nothing on it is still going to require moisture to rust. S

    >
    > Wha t is water vapor in the air,Alex?


    Bzzzt, no points for you. First he said the weather was dry. Then he
    said there were large temperature swings, perhaps humid air or
    condensation. In a marine or tropical environment, OK. But unless the
    correspondent is from the land of Oz, this is just an ordinary
    temperate climate. It takes a little more to get a new chain "covered
    in rust", especially since it was already covered with something.
    Whether a preservative or grease makes no difference. Perhaps it was
    magic rusting compound? That's beginning to sound more credible.
     
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