New chain waxing technique

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Phil, Squid-in-Training, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. So as part of our college team's sponsorship with Ritchey, I bought a big
    bottle of chain wax lube (wax with a solvent carrier) a long time ago and
    decided to finally use some now. I shook it up, applied it liberally on the
    dry chain, and noticed big clumps everywhere. It's a rainy 60 degrees here
    in Gainesville, and the wax solidified up hard as soon as it hit the chain,
    rendering it useless for lubing within.

    I remembered some of the hot wax ideas mentioned here before, and I figured
    I could use heat from my torch to melt it down into the rollers. I picked
    up the torch and forgot that I had broken off the safety head on it a while
    back. So I grabbed a bottle of alcohol and planned to drip it on, then
    light it. It turns out that there was no need for the alcohol. The solvent
    carrier of the Ritchey lube lit right up, and the burning chain, chainrings,
    and rear cog were a sight to see. Thirty seconds later, the fire goes out,
    the wax is well-distributed around the chain (although a longer burn would
    have been prefereable to ensure the pins heated up sufficiently.) This was
    quick, easy, and kinda fun. Maybe White Lightning will do the same...

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
    Tags:


  2. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" wrote: (clip) the burning chain, chainrings, and
    rear cog were a sight to see. (clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    How about a picture of you riding the bike at night, with the chain lit up?
     
  3. Ron Ruff

    Ron Ruff Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > The solvent
    > carrier of the Ritchey lube lit right up, and the burning chain, chainrings,
    > and rear cog were a sight to see. Thirty seconds later, the fire goes out,
    > the wax is well-distributed around the chain (although a longer burn would
    > have been prefereable to ensure the pins heated up sufficiently.) This was
    > quick, easy, and kinda fun. Maybe White Lightning will do the same...
    >


    I think you are onto something... sort of a "flame cleaning/lubing
    method"... burn off all that old nasty oil residue. I think the trick
    will be to get the right proportion of flammable agents in the mix to
    just melt the wax... without also melting your chainrings.

    Opps... what about those plastic jockey wheels?
     
  4. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 01:19:25 -0500, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So as part of our college team's sponsorship with Ritchey, I bought a big
    >bottle of chain wax lube (wax with a solvent carrier) a long time ago and
    >decided to finally use some now. I shook it up, applied it liberally on the
    >dry chain, and noticed big clumps everywhere. It's a rainy 60 degrees here
    >in Gainesville, and the wax solidified up hard as soon as it hit the chain,
    >rendering it useless for lubing within.
    >
    >I remembered some of the hot wax ideas mentioned here before, and I figured
    >I could use heat from my torch to melt it down into the rollers. I picked
    >up the torch and forgot that I had broken off the safety head on it a while
    >back. So I grabbed a bottle of alcohol and planned to drip it on, then
    >light it. It turns out that there was no need for the alcohol. The solvent
    >carrier of the Ritchey lube lit right up, and the burning chain, chainrings,
    >and rear cog were a sight to see. Thirty seconds later, the fire goes out,
    >the wax is well-distributed around the chain (although a longer burn would
    >have been prefereable to ensure the pins heated up sufficiently.) This was
    >quick, easy, and kinda fun. Maybe White Lightning will do the same...


    If you've got a light colored frame this could make for an interesting paint
    effect when you're done.

    Don't forget the asbestos chainstay protector.

    Ron
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 01:19:25 -0500, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[snip] The solvent
    >carrier of the Ritchey lube lit right up, and the burning chain, chainrings,
    >and rear cog were a sight to see. Thirty seconds later, the fire goes out,
    >the wax is well-distributed around the chain (although a longer burn would
    >have been prefereable to ensure the pins heated up sufficiently.) This was
    >quick, easy, and kinda fun. Maybe White Lightning will do the same...


    I think, in deference to my desire to not meddle with the tempering of
    the sideplates and/or risk torching the paint job on my chainstays,
    that I will not attempt to duplicate this experiment.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. Ron Ruff wrote:
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    >> The solvent
    >> carrier of the Ritchey lube lit right up, and the burning chain,
    >> chainrings, and rear cog were a sight to see. Thirty seconds later,
    >> the fire goes out, the wax is well-distributed around the chain
    >> (although a longer burn would have been prefereable to ensure the
    >> pins heated up sufficiently.) This was quick, easy, and kinda fun.
    >> Maybe White Lightning will do the same...
    >>

    >
    > I think you are onto something... sort of a "flame cleaning/lubing
    > method"... burn off all that old nasty oil residue. I think the trick
    > will be to get the right proportion of flammable agents in the mix to
    > just melt the wax... without also melting your chainrings.


    Euh... what kind of chainrings do you use? Non-metal ones that can't handle
    a couple hundred degrees?

    > Opps... what about those plastic jockey wheels?


    I forgot to mention that this was on my singlespeed townie. No plastic
    anywhere.
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  7. john

    john Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:

    I think, in deference to my desire to not meddle with the tempering of
    the sideplates and/or risk torching the paint job on my chainstays,
    that I will not attempt to duplicate this experiment.

    Hi there, Werehatrack

    Your concern about paint makes sense. But I doubt that the flames have
    enough total heat to affect the steel in the chain. The lowest temp I'm
    aware of to cause even a minor permanent change to steel is ~550F.
    Perhaps Mr. Beam could bring some of his expertise to bear on this?

    Sounds like fun, knida like Jessie James on Monster Garage, John
     
  8. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Ron Ruff wrote:

    > I think you are onto something... sort of a "flame cleaning/lubing
    > method"... burn off all that old nasty oil residue. I think the trick
    > will be to get the right proportion of flammable agents in the mix to
    > just melt the wax... without also melting your chainrings.


    Perhaps a peaceful use for napalm? Brush it into the chain and ignite
    to remove the old lubricant - in the morning of course, because of the
    great smell. Apply the wax when the fire is out but before the chain is
    cool.

    > Opps... what about those plastic jockey wheels?


    Well, maybe we haven't got all the bugs ironed out yet.

    --
    Dave...
     
  9. thesuper

    thesuper Guest

    at a world cup event back in 97 i was show this method by one of the
    mechanics working for the Toyota/RAV4 team (Bob DeGregorio). been
    doing it ever since. it also works with white lightning and finish
    line's krytech.

    so long as you set the chain in the largest ring and some large cog,
    there's hardly a chance to do damage to anything. and if you pedal
    while it's flaming.....no need to worry about the pulleys.

    funny that this comes up several years later....i've been passing this
    on to most people i know and meet at races.

    it's the absolute WORST method for cleaning chains though.
     
  10. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    john wrote:
    > Werehatrack wrote:
    >
    > I think, in deference to my desire to not meddle with the tempering of
    > the sideplates and/or risk torching the paint job on my chainstays,
    > that I will not attempt to duplicate this experiment.
    >
    > Hi there, Werehatrack
    >
    > Your concern about paint makes sense. But I doubt that the flames have
    > enough total heat to affect the steel in the chain. The lowest temp I'm
    > aware of to cause even a minor permanent change to steel is ~550F.
    > Perhaps Mr. Beam could bring some of his expertise to bear on this?
    >
    > Sounds like fun, knida like Jessie James on Monster Garage, John
    >

    if you're just melting wax, there will be no effect on chain temper.

    if however the chain is heated enough to cause any coloration, you can
    use this chart to identify the temperature you've reached, and get an
    idea of the effect it'll have.

    http://www.threeplanes.net/toolsteel.html
     
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