New Chain

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Gonzalez, Jul 29, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    I've had my bike for about 15 years. Every 18 months I have had to replace the chain and block, and
    every 5 years the chain ring. I'm pretty sure that I read in this news group that if you replace the
    chain more regularly it extends the life of the block and chain ring.

    So that's what I've done - after 6 months I've replaced the chain. Unfortunately the new chain skips
    in the lowest gears. Will the chain bed itself in soon, or will I have to replace the block?

    Thanks.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Gonzalez wrote:
    > I've had my bike for about 15 years. Every 18 months I have had to replace the chain and block,
    > and every 5 years the chain ring. I'm pretty sure that I read in this news group that if you
    > replace the chain more regularly it extends the life of the block and chain ring.
    >
    > So that's what I've done - after 6 months I've replaced the chain. Unfortunately the new chain
    > skips in the lowest gears. Will the chain bed itself in soon

    It might if it's just a slight skipping. Personally though, I would prefer to replace the block or
    just the affected sprockets if possible.

    The alternative is just to bung the old chain back on and carry on until it all wears out. This is a
    reasonable option if chainring(s) (or whole bike!) is due for a change soonish anyway.

    For the future, it will help to regularly measure the chain. See: www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html -
    Measuring Chain Wear

    ~PB
     
  3. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    >It might if it's just a slight skipping. Personally though, I would prefer to replace the block or
    >just the affected sprockets if possible.

    Probably the entire block.

    >The alternative is just to bung the old chain back on and carry on until it all wears out. This is
    >a reasonable option if chainring(s) (or whole bike!) is due for a change soonish anyway.

    Not really an option. I'm starting the End to End in 2 weeks' time.

    >For the future, it will help to regularly measure the chain. See: www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html
    >- Measuring Chain Wear

    The Oracle (TM) didn't inspire confidence on this occasion.

    "Chain maintenance is one of the most controversial aspects of bicycle mechanics."
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  4. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Pete Biggs wrote:
    >
    > >It might if it's just a slight skipping. Personally though, I would prefer to replace the block
    > >or just the affected sprockets if possible.
    >
    > Probably the entire block.
    >
    > >The alternative is just to bung the old chain back on and carry on until it all wears out. This
    > >is a reasonable option if chainring(s) (or whole bike!) is due for a change soonish anyway.
    >
    > Not really an option. I'm starting the End to End in 2 weeks' time.
    >
    > >For the future, it will help to regularly measure the chain. See:
    > >www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html - Measuring Chain Wear
    >
    > The Oracle (TM) didn't inspire confidence on this occasion.
    >
    > "Chain maintenance is one of the most controversial aspects of bicycle mechanics."
    > --
    > remove remove to reply

    Hey Gonzalez! I reckon for the cost, your original routine is best. You know it works, why change
    it? Change the cartridge and enjoy your end 2 end, Dave.
     
  5. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've read a lot of messages similar to this and I can't really understand why folk need to do this. I rarely change my cassettes or sprockets, my tourer has done over 10,000 miles on the same block and chainset, we used the same chain for 6000 miles on my World Tour. Perhaps my cleaning and maintenace schedule is doing it the trick. Maybe modern lightweight components are not built like they used to be !
     
  6. Gonzalez wrote:
    >
    > Pete Biggs wrote:
    >
    > >It might if it's just a slight skipping. Personally though, I would prefer to replace the block
    > >or just the affected sprockets if possible.
    >
    > Probably the entire block.
    >
    > >The alternative is just to bung the old chain back on and carry on until it all wears out. This
    > >is a reasonable option if chainring(s) (or whole bike!) is due for a change soonish anyway.
    >
    > Not really an option. I'm starting the End to End in 2 weeks' time.
    >
    > >For the future, it will help to regularly measure the chain. See:
    > >www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html - Measuring Chain Wear
    >
    > The Oracle (TM) didn't inspire confidence on this occasion.
    >
    > "Chain maintenance is one of the most controversial aspects of bicycle mechanics."

    I've just changed a chain with no 'skipping' probs! Previously I've done the same as you & wait for
    them all to go, but this time I kept measuring my chain. When the length between links had gone up
    from 12" to 12 1/16" (about 700 miles in my case)I put a new one on. With chains at about £25 and
    cassettes at around £40 the more life I can squeeze out of the cassette the better.

    Phil
     
  7. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Phil.Winterbourne wrote:

    >I've just changed a chain with no 'skipping' probs! Previously I've done the same as you & wait for
    >them all to go, but this time I kept measuring my chain. When the length between links had gone up
    >from 12" to 12 1/16" (about 700 miles in my case)I put a new one on. With chains at about £25 and
    >cassettes at around £40 the more life I can squeeze out of the cassette the better.

    Maybe I left it too late. 6 months = 1500 - 2000 miles. :(

    Do you think the chain and block with bed in. If I don't push hard in the lowest gears the
    chain doesn't skip. Can I get away with pushing in 18th and 19th gears and only use the 20th
    and 21st gears when cruising until it beds in? Or will I do more harm to the new chain and old
    block if I leave it?
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > I've read a lot of messages similar to this and I can't really understand why folk need to
    > do this.

    They do it because it makes expensive chainrings and cassettes last longer and it ensures the chain
    will never skip (assuming replacement chain doesn't skip) - which can be unpleasant at first and
    dangerous after it soon worsens.

    > I rarely change my cassettes or sprockets, my tourer has done over 10,000 miles on the same block
    > and chainset

    Yes the same chain & block can be used for several thousand miles together but it will all be
    gradually wearing out (incluiding chainrings). 10,000 is a lot for modern components though. 4 to 6
    thousand would be more typical, I think, for a road bike. Less for MTB drivetrains sometimes.

    >, we used the same chain for 6000 miles on my World Tour. Perhaps my cleaning and maintenace
    >schedule is doing it the trick.

    Cleaning does help; so does smooth pedalling and avoiding cross-over gears; different gear ratios
    make a difference as well.

    > Maybe modern lightweight components are not built like they used to be !

    That's right, they are not. Sprockets and chains are thinner. More gears
    = more crossed-over chain angles. And some cassettes are horrifically
    expensive (although basic ones are still cheap).

    ~PB
     
  9. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    > >I've just changed a chain with no 'skipping' probs! Previously I've done the same as you & wait
    > >for them all to go, but this time I kept measuring my chain. When the length between links had
    > >gone up from 12" to 12 1/16" (about 700 miles in my case)I put a new one on. With chains at about
    > >£25 and cassettes at around £40 the more life I can squeeze out of the cassette the better.

    What chain is that? I use Sachs chains at about £7 on my MTB, change them every 600 miles or so and
    the XT cassette lasts 5 years (6000 miles of off road riding). I have a niave belief that a new
    chain will also help with clean shifting.

    John
     
  10. Neil D

    Neil D Guest

    "Gonzalez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Phil.Winterbourne wrote:
    >
    > >I've just changed a chain with no 'skipping' probs! Previously I've done the same as you & wait
    > >for them all to go, but this time I kept measuring my chain. When the length between links had
    > >gone up from 12" to 12 1/16" (about 700 miles in my case)I put a new one on. With chains at about
    > >£25 and cassettes at around £40 the more life I can squeeze out of the cassette the better.
    >
    > Maybe I left it too late. 6 months = 1500 - 2000 miles. :(
    >
    > Do you think the chain and block with bed in. If I don't push hard in the lowest gears the chain
    > doesn't skip. Can I get away with pushing in 18th and 19th gears and only use the 20th and 21st
    > gears when cruising until it beds in? Or will I do more harm to the new chain and old block if I
    > leave it?
    > --
    > remove remove to reply

    There's something wrong here. My good road bike: 9spd Campag steel 13~23 = 13,594 MILES on cassette.
    Fitted a new chain last month (old had same miles as block). It jumped on 39x13,14,15 (my usual ride
    gears) when under pressure, 18,19,21 just noisy. After about 100 miles jumped only when oos. After
    about 150 miles fairly good. After 200 miles NO problems.
     
  11. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:

    >You left it too long before changing the chain. If you want to prolong the life of the block put
    >the old chain back on. If it were mine I'd put a new block on pronto. You don't really want to set
    >out on your e2e with any known mechanical problems your bike.

    The block has now been changed. I'm off on a 70 mile training run over the North Downs tomorrow with
    full panniers. Then on Friday I'm catching a train to Swansea and cycling to the Gower Peninsular to
    camp for three nights.

    One day next week I want to try a 100 mile run with a full load. I'm not expecting to do anywhere
    nearly that much for the E2E but it would be comforting to know that I could if I wanted to.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  12. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 10:02:53 +0100, Gonzalez <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Do you think the chain and block with bed in.

    Yes. The chain will eventually stretch to the point where it fits the worn block, which itself will
    probably wear at a faster rate until that happens.

    > If I don't push hard in the lowest gears the chain doesn't skip. Can I get away with pushing in
    > 18th and 19th gears and only use the 20th and 21st gears when cruising until it beds in? Or will I
    > do more harm to the new chain and old block if I leave it?

    You left it too long before changing the chain. If you want to prolong the life of the block put the
    old chain back on. If it were mine I'd put a new block on pronto. You don't really want to set out
    on your e2e with any known mechanical problems your bike.

    --
    Dave...
     
  13. Neil D wrote:

    > There's something wrong here. My good road bike: 9spd Campag steel 13~23 = 13,594 MILES on
    > cassette. Fitted a new chain last month (old had same miles as block). It jumped on 39x13,14,15
    > (my usual ride gears) when under pressure, 18,19,21 just noisy. After about 100 miles jumped only
    > when oos. After about 150 miles fairly good. After 200 miles NO problems.

    Back in the /very/ old days, I used to use my 17T sprocket 90% of the time when commuting, and just
    shifted between the 28 and 42. So when it started to look decrepit, I replaced the 17 and the chain.
    BUT, the other sprockets /had/ worn enough to make it skip, to the extent that the started to shed
    teeth. B+gg+r! Back to shop for five more sprockets...

    As an aside, why are cassettes, which contain no moving parts, just as expensive as freewheels,
    which do? I smell a scam...

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  14. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Neil D wrote:
    > There's something wrong here. My good road bike: 9spd Campag steel 13~23 = 13,594 MILES on
    > cassette. Fitted a new chain last month (old had same miles as block). It jumped on 39x13,14,15
    > (my usual ride gears) when under pressure, 18,19,21 just noisy. After about 100 miles jumped only
    > when oos. After about 150 miles fairly good. After 200 miles NO problems.

    That is bad practice because a new chain on such worn sprockets will rapidly wear - won't last so
    long and will wear out chainrings. That 200 miles couldn't have been fun anyway.

    I had severe skipping when I put a new chain on a Campag 8sp steel cassette that had done 6000 miles
    (with same chain). So bad that I was not prepared to tolerate it for 20 miles, let alone 200.

    ~PB
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...