New Custom MWB Recumbent

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Mark Stonich, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. Mark Stonich

    Mark Stonich Guest

    http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/PaulAndBike.jpg

    The goal was a bike with the seat and BB heights of a Giro,
    but lighter and without pedal steer or heel strike. And with
    optimized steering ergonomics and without chain idlers. The
    rearward CoG eliminates the typical SWB quick response on
    the roll axis, often called twitchyness. Less weight on the
    smaller of the tires should yield lower total rolling
    resistance than an SWB.

    WB = 55" Head angle 65 deg, Trail 0.5", Tiller 7", Weight
    distribution 1/3F - 2/3R BB ht. 25.5" Seat Ht. 22.5" (to
    compressed foam) 155mm Cranks. 559 x 42 rear, 406 x 37 front
    Unlike an SWB, the rider's heels overlap the front wheel so
    close to the steering axis that heel/fender interference
    isn't an issue.

    After a test ride the new owner is one very happy fella.

    He took off down my street and turned around to come back
    when all of a sudden he started grinning like a fool. He'd
    suddenly realized that after 50 yards on a new bike, he'd
    felt confident enough to make a U turn on a narrow, dirty
    street, without unclipping his SPDs. "I wouldn't have done
    that on my own bike." After a bit more riding, including
    getting it up to speed and diving into some turns, he said
    "I never realized any bike could feel so confidence
    inspiring."

    AFAIK It's the first 'bent that's been designed *completely*
    according to http://bikesmithdesign.com/Design/12Steps.html

    What makes this bike handle even better than those I've
    built for myself is that while my last two have the steering
    ergonomics dialed in, I couldn't optimize weight
    distribution with the low BB without making them longer. But
    one was a light monotube, so more WB would have been too
    flexy, and the other has to fit in a confined parking space.

    Of course I'm biased, but I think it's the best handling
    bike I've ever been on. Rock solid from sub-walking speeds
    to bombing down the steepest hill in S. Mpls. More Pix
    http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Right.jpg
    http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/RightRear.jpg
    http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Bars.jpg
    http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/SeatMount.jpg
    http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Left.jpg

    The frame was designed by me and built by Terry Osell and
    me, for a guy we ride with. The rear frame configuration is
    dictated by the need for a seat height that works for a 5'
    7" rider, but wanting as high a BB as we could get without
    the chain hitting the seat or needing power robbing chain
    idlers. The new rear configuration gives a ride that is
    nicely compliant in the vertical plane, but without chain
    tension induced pogoing.

    Even with fenders, the heavy Rans seat, and Terry's
    humongous fillets, it weighs 28 lbs. The final handlebar
    riser will be less adjustable, but save about a half pound.

    Mark Stonich; BikeSmith Design & Fabrication LLC
    http://bikesmithdesign.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Watkin

    Steve Watkin Guest

    Similar to my Bevo bike!!!

    SW

    "Mark Stonich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/PaulAndBike.jpg
    >
    > The goal was a bike with the seat and BB heights of a
    > Giro, but lighter and without pedal steer or heel strike.
    > And with optimized steering ergonomics and without chain
    > idlers. The rearward CoG eliminates the typical SWB quick
    > response on the roll axis, often called twitchyness. Less
    > weight on the smaller of the tires should yield lower
    > total rolling resistance than an SWB.
    >
    > WB = 55" Head angle 65 deg, Trail 0.5", Tiller 7", Weight
    > distribution 1/3F - 2/3R BB ht. 25.5" Seat Ht. 22.5" (to
    > compressed foam) 155mm Cranks. 559 x 42 rear, 406 x 37
    > front Unlike an SWB, the rider's heels overlap the front
    > wheel so close to the steering axis that heel/fender
    > interference isn't an issue.
    >
    > After a test ride the new owner is one very happy fella.
    >
    > He took off down my street and turned around to come back
    > when all of a sudden he started grinning like a fool. He'd
    > suddenly realized that after 50 yards on a new bike, he'd
    > felt confident enough to make a U turn on a narrow, dirty
    > street, without unclipping his SPDs. "I wouldn't have done
    > that on my own bike." After a bit more riding, including
    > getting it up to speed and diving into some turns, he said
    > "I never realized any bike could feel so confidence
    > inspiring."
    >
    > AFAIK It's the first 'bent that's been designed
    > *completely* according to
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Design/12Steps.html
    >
    > What makes this bike handle even better than those I've
    > built for myself is that while my last two have the
    > steering ergonomics dialed in, I couldn't optimize
    > weight distribution with the low BB without making them
    > longer. But one was a light monotube, so more WB would
    > have been too flexy, and the other has to fit in a
    > confined parking space.
    >
    > Of course I'm biased, but I think it's the best handling
    > bike I've ever been on. Rock solid from sub-walking speeds
    > to bombing down the steepest hill in S. Mpls. More Pix
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Right.jpg
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/RightRear.jpg
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Bars.jpg
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/SeatMount.jpg
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Left.jpg
    >
    > The frame was designed by me and built by Terry Osell and
    > me, for a guy we ride with. The rear frame configuration
    > is dictated by the need for a seat height that works for a
    > 5' 7" rider, but wanting as high a BB as we could get
    > without the chain hitting the seat or needing power
    > robbing chain idlers. The new rear configuration gives a
    > ride that is nicely compliant in the vertical plane, but
    > without chain tension induced pogoing.
    >
    > Even with fenders, the heavy Rans seat, and Terry's
    > humongous fillets, it weighs 28 lbs. The final
    > handlebar riser will be less adjustable, but save about
    > a half pound.
    >
    > Mark Stonich; BikeSmith Design & Fabrication LLC
    > http://bikesmithdesign.com
     
  3. Bentbiker

    Bentbiker Guest

    I knew I had seem something similar, just couldn't place
    where. any links for the Bevo bikes?

    Steve Watkin wrote:
    > Similar to my Bevo bike!!!
    >
    > SW
    >
    >
    > "Mark Stonich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/PaulAndBike.jpg
    >>
    >>The goal was a bike with the seat and BB heights of a
    >>Giro, but lighter and without pedal steer or heel strike.
    >>And with optimized steering ergonomics and without chain
    >>idlers. The rearward CoG eliminates the typical SWB quick
    >>response on the roll axis, often called twitchyness. Less
    >>weight on the smaller of the tires should yield lower
    >>total rolling resistance than an SWB.
    >>
    >>WB = 55" Head angle 65 deg, Trail 0.5", Tiller 7", Weight
    >>distribution 1/3F - 2/3R BB ht. 25.5" Seat Ht. 22.5" (to
    >>compressed foam) 155mm Cranks. 559 x 42 rear, 406 x 37
    >>front Unlike an SWB, the rider's heels overlap the front
    >>wheel so close to the steering axis that heel/fender
    >>interference isn't an issue.
    >>
    >>After a test ride the new owner is one very happy fella.
    >>
    >>He took off down my street and turned around to come back
    >>when all of a sudden he started grinning like a fool. He'd
    >>suddenly realized that after 50 yards on a new bike, he'd
    >>felt confident enough to make a U turn on a narrow, dirty
    >>street, without unclipping his SPDs. "I wouldn't have done
    >>that on my own bike." After a bit more riding, including
    >>getting it up to speed and diving into some turns, he said
    >>"I never realized any bike could feel so confidence
    >>inspiring."
    >>
    >>AFAIK It's the first 'bent that's been designed
    >>*completely* according to
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Design/12Steps.html
    >>
    >>What makes this bike handle even better than those I've
    >>built for myself is that while my last two have the
    >>steering ergonomics dialed in, I couldn't optimize
    >>weight distribution with the low BB without making them
    >>longer. But one was a light monotube, so more WB would
    >>have been too flexy, and the other has to fit in a
    >>confined parking space.
    >>
    >>Of course I'm biased, but I think it's the best handling
    >>bike I've ever been on. Rock solid from sub-walking speeds
    >>to bombing down the steepest hill in S. Mpls. More Pix
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Right.jpg
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/RightRear.jpg
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Bars.jpg
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/SeatMount.jpg
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com/Paul/Left.jpg
    >>
    >>The frame was designed by me and built by Terry Osell and
    >>me, for a guy we ride with. The rear frame configuration
    >>is dictated by the need for a seat height that works for a
    >>5' 7" rider, but wanting as high a BB as we could get
    >>without the chain hitting the seat or needing power
    >>robbing chain idlers. The new rear configuration gives a
    >>ride that is nicely compliant in the vertical plane, but
    >>without chain tension induced pogoing.
    >>
    >>Even with fenders, the heavy Rans seat, and Terry's
    >>humongous fillets, it weighs 28 lbs. The final
    >>handlebar riser will be less adjustable, but save about
    >>a half pound.
    >>
    >>Mark Stonich; BikeSmith Design & Fabrication LLC
    >>http://bikesmithdesign.com
    >
     
  4. Mark Stonich

    Mark Stonich Guest

    bentbiker <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I knew I had seem something similar, just couldn't place
    > where. any links for the Bevo bikes?

    http://www.spezialrad-shop.de/bevo-kauf.html

    > Steve Watkin wrote:
    > > Similar to my Bevo bike!!!

    Other than the BB above the front wheel, which isn't
    uncommon in Europe, there far more differences than
    similarities between them.

    Don't want to sound like I'm diss'ing the Bevo though. If I
    ever do an FWD, I'll steal liberally from their front end
    design. Especially the offset fork legs.

    I've never heard from a Bevo owner. Anything you
    particularly like or dislike about yours?
     
  5. Mark,

    > Other than the BB above the front wheel, which isn't
    > uncommon in Europe,

    Do you have a copy of the Second International Human Powered
    Vehicle Scientific Symposium-1984?

    The IHPVA used to sell them, don't know if they still have
    any.

    German engineering professor, Paul Schondorf, did an
    "Analysis of Supine Recumbent Bicycles". He built the
    Muscooter series of SWB, MWB, LWB, bikes and trikes. His
    finally designs "fur rekordfahrten" are exactly like your
    MWB bikes.

    If you can find a copy, it is well worth the price.

    Warren
     
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