New Cycling Organization

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bradley Saul, Aug 19, 2003.

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  1. Bradley Saul

    Bradley Saul Guest

    New Athletic Organization Promotes Organic, Plant-based Nutrition, Healthy Living, and Ecological
    Awareness.

    August 19, 2003, Santa Rosa, CA – A new nonprofit organization, OrganicAthlete, calls on athletes to
    promote optimal health and ecological values. Just as organic farmers carefully monitor what goes
    into their crops, organic athletes should similarly adapt their nutrition and lifestyle to minimize
    harm and maximize regeneration and health.

    Elite athletes often serve as role models of vegetarian health, and in 2004 the board plans to
    launch a "produce power" campaign that will publicize the health and ecological benefits of a fruit
    and vegetable based diet. OrganicAthlete speakers and the Organic Revolution cycling team will offer
    educational presentations to community, sports, and school groups.

    "Athletes are influential people," says renowned sports nutritionist
    Dr. Doug Graham. "Whether that is good or bad is not our concern. The fact remains, athletes
    influence people. OrganicAthlete is the only organization to actively focus on providing
    first-rate nutrition and health information to athletes while also exposing the actions of
    responsible athletes in a fashion that will encourage a positive influence on others."

    "Ultimately," says founder Bradley Saul, "we want to harness athletic energy to improve individual,
    community, and ecosystem health and fitness around the globe."

    The OrganicAthlete newsletter, Musa sapientum ("food for the wise"), offers a monthly serving of
    scientific nutritional and health information, ecological performance issues, and athlete activism.
    Athletes interested joining our team and sponsors interested in symbiosis may contact Bradley Saul
    at [email protected] or 707-332-0865 or visit www.organicathlete.org.

    About OrganicAthlete. As exemplars for the optimal power of the human body, unlimited mind, and free
    spirit, athletes can lead a creative revolution towards rejuvenative lifestyle and business habits.
    OrganicAthlete educates, fosters, and connects athletes in a cooperative effort to promote healthful
    living and earth regeneration in communities, sports, and schools.

    ###
     
    Tags:


  2. "Bradley Saul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > New Athletic Organization Promotes Organic, Plant-based Nutrition, Healthy Living, and Ecological
    > Awareness.
    >
    > August 19, 2003, Santa Rosa, CA - A new nonprofit organization, OrganicAthlete, calls on athletes
    > to promote optimal health and ecological values. Just as organic farmers carefully monitor what
    > goes into their crops, organic athletes should similarly adapt their nutrition and lifestyle to
    > minimize harm and maximize regeneration and health.
    >
    > Elite athletes often serve as role models of vegetarian health, and in 2004 the board plans to
    > launch a "produce power" campaign that will publicize the health and ecological benefits of a
    > fruit and vegetable based diet.

    <snip>

    Dumbass -

    In European stage races, one of the preferred recovery meals is steak and rice.

    Additionally, the greatest athlete in our sport, Eddy Merckx, is nicknamed "The Cannibal" because of
    the fellow competitors he would have for lunch.

    yum yum.

    Perhaps you should try the badminton newsgroup. We cyclists are not touchy-feely sensitive types. We
    enjoy seeing the look of suffering on our fellow competitors' faces.
     
  3. H Squared

    H Squared Guest

    Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    >
    > "Bradley Saul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...

    > > the board plans to launch a "produce power" campaign that will publicize the health and
    > > ecological benefits of a fruit and vegetable based diet.
    >

    > In European stage races, one of the preferred recovery meals is steak and rice.
    >
    > Additionally, the greatest athlete in our sport, Eddy Merckx, is nicknamed "The Cannibal" because
    > of the fellow competitors he would have for lunch.
    >
    > yum yum.
    >
    > Perhaps you should try the badminton newsgroup. We cyclists are not touchy-feely sensitive types.
    > We enjoy seeing the look of suffering on our fellow competitors' faces.

    i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if everyone
    ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..

    heather
     
  4. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    h squared wrote:
    >
    > i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if
    > everyone ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..

    If everyone ate like that, there'd be plenty of veal and foie gras for me.
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2003/08/19/MN245934.DTL

    You know, the French seem to hold the black-footed chickens of Bresse in especially high regard, in
    part, because these poultry are raised not in factories but in the open ("en plein air"). The idea
    is that happy chickens make for better-tasting chickens. I confess that this thought has been
    occupying me lately: is it better to end the happy life of a fulfilled chicken, or to eat a
    factory-raised chicken for whom death is a release from living hell?
     
  5. h squared wrote:

    > Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > >
    > > "Bradley Saul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > the board plans to launch a "produce power" campaign that will publicize the health and
    > > > ecological benefits of a fruit and vegetable based diet.
    > >
    >
    > > In European stage races, one of the preferred recovery meals is steak and rice.
    > >
    > > Additionally, the greatest athlete in our sport, Eddy Merckx, is nicknamed "The Cannibal"
    > > because of the fellow competitors he would have for lunch.
    > >
    > > yum yum.
    > >
    > > Perhaps you should try the badminton newsgroup. We cyclists are not touchy-feely sensitive
    > > types. We enjoy seeing the look of suffering on our fellow competitors' faces.
    >
    > i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if
    > everyone ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..
    >
    > heather

    Maybe not so fat, but more gas...

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
  6. Bikerecker

    Bikerecker Guest

    Meyerson's vegan turf seems to be getting stomped on...

    Saul was a good U-23 racing for Nashville based VeloClips last year, wondered what happened to him.

    I'm betting he will make a splash in California, vegan or not. Greg Miller
     
  7. Tritonrider

    Tritonrider Guest

    >From: [email protected] (Bikerecker)

    >Meyerson's vegan turf seems to be getting stomped on...
    >
    >Saul was a good U-23 racing for Nashville based VeloClips last year, wondered what happened to him.
    >
    >I'm betting he will make a splash in California, vegan or not. Greg Miller
    >
    >
    >

    Greg I'm betting on Adam to be top 10 nationally in 'cross this year. He's incredibly fit and
    motivated for this season. It's gonna be a lot of fun around here this fall. Bill C
     
  8. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> If everyone ate like that, there'd be plenty of veal and foie gras for me.
    > http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2003/08/19/MN245934.DTL

    It's all about the terrorism now:

    "Sonoma Police Chief John Gurney said his department is coordinating with other local police
    departments and the FBI. He calls the case "domestic terrorism." "

    Here in America, there would be plenty of veal for you, as we only manage to consume about one
    pound per capita a year (as opposed to the Italian's 15). Kind of perplexing, considering that
    veal is one of the leanest meats you can buy. One thing I was curious about: is the veal
    available in France mostly stall-raised, formula-fed or is it grass-fed ("free-range"). I think
    the grass-fed tastes much better.

    >
    > You know, the French seem to hold the black-footed chickens of Bresse in especially high regard,
    > in part, because these poultry are raised not in factories but in the open ("en plein air"). The
    > idea is that happy chickens make for better-tasting chickens. I confess that this thought has been
    > occupying me lately: is it better to end the happy life of a fulfilled chicken, or to eat a
    > factory-raised chicken for whom death is a release from living hell?

    Take the happy one.

    --
    tanx, Howard

    "Better a lapdog for a slip of a girl than a ... git." Blackadder

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  9. Top Sirloin

    Top Sirloin Guest

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 20:06:04 GMT, h squared <[email protected]> wrote:

    >i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if
    >everyone ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..

    There'd just be a whole lot fewer people altogether considering the difficulties strict vegetarian
    women often have getting pregnant.

    Scott Johnson "There is nothing, I think, more unfortunate than to have soft, chubby, fat-looking
    children who go to watch their school play basketball every Saturday and regard that as their
    week's exercise."
    - John F. Kennedy, 1962
     
  10. "h squared" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > >
    > > "Bradley Saul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > the board plans to launch a "produce power" campaign that will publicize the health and
    > > > ecological benefits of a fruit and vegetable based diet.
    > >
    >
    > > In European stage races, one of the preferred recovery meals is steak
    and
    > > rice.
    > >
    > > Additionally, the greatest athlete in our sport, Eddy Merckx, is
    nicknamed
    > > "The Cannibal" because of the fellow competitors he would have for
    lunch.
    > >
    > > yum yum.
    > >
    > > Perhaps you should try the badminton newsgroup. We cyclists are not touchy-feely sensitive
    > > types. We enjoy seeing the look of suffering on
    our
    > > fellow competitors' faces.
    >
    >
    > i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if
    > everyone ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..

    There is no shortage of Vegetarian Fatties. I know a few myself.

    They can eat cheese, avocado, drink lots of juice, beer, eat lots of candy, buttered popcorn and
    icees at the movies, soda, fettucine alfredo, etc. etc.

    If you consume more than you burn, the fat is going to come no matter what form the calories are in.

    K. Gringioni rbr nutritionist
     
  11. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Top Sirloin wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 20:06:04 GMT, h squared <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if
    >> everyone ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..
    >
    > There'd just be a whole lot fewer people altogether considering the difficulties strict vegetarian
    > women often have getting pregnant.

    As long as minimum standards for calories, proteins, and fats are satisfied, I'm not sure what
    you're saying is true.
     
  12. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Howard Kveck wrote:
    > Here in America, there would be plenty of veal for you, as we only manage to consume about one
    > pound per capita a year (as opposed to the Italian's 15). Kind of perplexing, considering that
    > veal is one of the leanest meats you can buy. One thing I was curious about: is the veal
    > available in France mostly stall-raised, formula-fed or is it grass-fed ("free-range"). I think
    > the grass-fed tastes much better.

    The reason why there is so little veal in the US is related to the reason why most of the beef here
    is so bad, and has deep implications for the style of classical French cooking. In a nutshell, most
    of the cattle in the US is raised for its flesh, while here dairy cows are far more important. This
    is why there are 400 different kinds of cheese here but tossing a steak on the grill never developed
    as the central concept of French cooking: breeds of cattle selected for their milk production aren't
    well-suited to that. Rather, beef from dairy breeds needs slow cooking, usually in the presence of
    aromatics (like onions and carrots and herbs), after which the pan is de-glazed, the juices reduced,
    and a sauce is built up to conserve and concentrate what few flavors the beef started out with.
    Basically, there's a trade-off between eating tasty beef or eating tasty cheese (or eating non-tasty
    cheese, depending on your view on glandular secretions that have been allowed to clot, dosed with
    bacteria, and then allowed to sit until acquiring the smell of dirty feet. And that's if it's
    successful). Veal is a side-effect of the societal preference for cheese,

    >> You know, the French seem to hold the black-footed chickens of Bresse in especially high regard,
    >> in part, because these poultry are raised not in factories but in the open ("en plein air"). The
    >> idea is that happy chickens make for better-tasting chickens. I confess that this thought has
    >> been occupying me lately: is it better to end the happy life of a fulfilled chicken, or to eat a
    >> factory-raised chicken for whom death is a release from living hell?
    >
    > Take the happy one.

    I tend to opt for the tasty ones. I try not to anthropomorphize the things I eat.
     
  13. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The reason why there is so little veal in the US is related to the reason why most of the beef
    > here is so bad, and has deep implications for the style of classical French cooking. In a
    > nutshell, most of the cattle in the US is raised for its flesh, while here dairy cows are far more
    > important. This is why there are 400 different kinds of cheese here but tossing a steak on the
    > grill never developed as the central concept of French cooking: breeds of cattle selected for
    > their milk production aren't well-suited to that. Rather, beef from dairy breeds needs slow
    > cooking, usually in the presence of aromatics (like onions and carrots and herbs), after which the
    > pan is de-glazed, the juices reduced, and a sauce is built up to conserve and concentrate what few
    > flavors the beef started out with.

    That last does jibe with what Waverly Root wrote in "The Food of Italy": "In France, a sauce is
    an adornment, even a disguise..." The high collagen content of veal (especially in cuts like
    shoulder and breast) is one of the reasons it makes such good sauces.

    I imagine the cows are slaughtered older in France than in America, which would also tend to lead to
    a somewhat tougher piece of meat. Here, they've cut the age cows make "slaughter weight" from 18-19
    months down to 14.

    > Basically, there's a trade-off between eating tasty beef or eating tasty cheese (or eating
    > non-tasty cheese, depending on your view on glandular secretions that have been allowed to clot,
    > dosed with bacteria, and then allowed to sit until acquiring the smell of dirty feet. And that's
    > if it's successful).

    I like that description.

    > Veal is a side-effect of the societal preference for cheese,

    I would imagine that veal's popularity in Italy is a societal preference for hearty sauces: it's
    mild, delicate flavor works well with those sauces.

    >
    > >> You know, the French seem to hold the black-footed chickens of Bresse in especially high
    > >> regard, in part, because these poultry are raised not in factories but in the open ("en plein
    > >> air"). The idea is that happy chickens make for better-tasting chickens. I confess that this
    > >> thought has been occupying me lately: is it better to end the happy life of a fulfilled
    > >> chicken, or to eat a factory-raised chicken for whom death is a release from living hell?
    > >
    > > Take the happy one.
    >
    > I tend to opt for the tasty ones. I try not to anthropomorphize the things I eat.

    Exactly. It either tastes good, or it doesn't.

    Eat steak, eat steak, it's good for you, Eat a cow, eat a cow, it's a thing that goes "mooo".
    "Eat Steak", Reverend Horton Heat

    --
    tanx, Howard

    "Better a lapdog for a slip of a girl than a ... git." Blackadder

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  14. Dan Gregory

    Dan Gregory Guest

    "Howard Kveck" <[email protected]> wrote in message Kind
    > of perplexing, considering that veal is one of the leanest meats you can
    buy.
    > One thing I was curious about: is the veal available in France mostly stall-raised, formula-fed or
    > is it grass-fed ("free-range"). I think the grass-fed tastes much better.
    If it's fed on anything other than milk it's not veal... Bon appétit Dan Gregory
     
  15. H Squared

    H Squared Guest

    Robert Chung wrote:
    >
    >
    > I tend to opt for the tasty ones. I try not to anthropomorphize the things I eat.

    you don't think that chickens (or other animals) have the ability to suffer?

    h
     
  16. H Squared

    H Squared Guest

    Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    >

    > There is no shortage of Vegetarian Fatties. I know a few myself.
    >
    > They can eat cheese, avocado, drink lots of juice, beer, eat lots of candy, buttered popcorn and
    > icees at the movies, soda, fettucine alfredo, etc. etc.
    >
    > If you consume more than you burn, the fat is going to come no matter what form the
    > calories are in.
    >
    > K. Gringioni rbr nutritionist

    what you wrote is true, but i don't think the op had the henry chang cheese and beer and soda diet
    in mind when he posted- "A new nonprofit organization, OrganicAthlete, calls on athletes to promote
    optimal health and ecological values. Just as organic farmers carefully monitor what goes into their
    crops, organic athletes should similarly adapt their nutrition and lifestyle to minimize harm and
    maximize regeneration and health."

    although i'm not, er, entirely clear on what he did have in mind, i got the sense that he was
    thinking something else. (and remind me not to eat at henry's house).

    heather
     
  17. "Dan Gregory" <[email protected]> writes:

    > If it's fed on anything other than milk it's not veal... Bon appétit Dan Gregory

    Real RoadMen eat Cheval of course, Dan. Much more protein.

    But is it fresh, waiter?

    Of Course, sir, if you look closely you'll see the marks where the jockey was whipping it in the
    3:30 this afternoon at Doncaster.

    --
    le vent a Dos

    Davey Crockett
     
  18. Top Sirloin

    Top Sirloin Guest

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 07:00:56 +0200, "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Top Sirloin wrote:
    >> On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 20:06:04 GMT, h squared <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> i can't believe you're arguing with someone advocating a fruit and vegetable based diet. if
    >>> everyone ate like that, fatties would be no more. oh, wait..nevermind..
    >>
    >> There'd just be a whole lot fewer people altogether considering the difficulties strict
    >> vegetarian women often have getting pregnant.
    >
    >As long as minimum standards for calories, proteins, and fats are satisfied, I'm not sure what
    >you're saying is true.

    It's a matter of vitamin (especially B12) and mineral deficiencies, not macronutrient composition.

    Not exactly about _getting_ pregnant, but:

    Persistence of neurological damage induced by dietary vitamin B-12 deficiency in infancy Arch Dis
    Child 1997 Aug;77(2):137-9.

    "A case is reported of a 14 month old boy with severe dietary vitamin B-12 deficiency caused by his
    mother's vegan diet. Clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and haematological findings are
    described. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed severe frontal and frontoparietal cranial
    atrophy. Vitamin B-12 supplements led to a rapid improvement of haematological and neurological
    symptoms. Serum vitamin B-12 and urinary methylmalonate excretion were normal 10 days after
    treatment began. After six weeks, EEG was normal and cranial MRI after 10 weeks showed complete
    disappearance of all structural abnormalities. Cognitive and language development, however, remained
    seriously retarded at the age of 2 years. It is concluded that infantile vitamin B-12 deficiency
    induced by maternal vegan diets may cause lasting neurodisability even though vitamin B-12
    supplementation leads to rapid resolution of cerebral atrophy and electroencephalographic
    abnormality."

    --
    Scott Johnson "When we decide to destroy a population, we send a definite order to them who have the
    good things in life and yet sin. So that Allah's word is proven true against them, then we destroy
    them utterly." (Koran, 17:16-17)
     
  19. Top Sirloin

    Top Sirloin Guest

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 10:35:27 GMT, h squared <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"A new nonprofit organization, OrganicAthlete, calls on athletes to promote optimal health and
    >ecological values. Just as organic farmers carefully monitor what goes into their crops, organic
    >athletes should similarly adapt their nutrition and lifestyle to minimize harm and maximize
    >regeneration and health."

    I think grass fed beef is super tasty.

    Does this mean I can be an "organic athlete"?

    --
    Scott Johnson "Always with the excuses for small legs. People like you are why they only open the
    top half of caskets." -Tommy Bowen
     
  20. Nev Shea

    Nev Shea Guest

    [email protected] (Bradley Saul) wrote in
    news:a636101d[email protected]:

    > New Athletic Organization Promotes Organic, Plant-based Nutrition, Healthy Living, and Ecological
    > Awareness.
    >
    > August 19, 2003, Santa Rosa, CA – A new nonprofit organization, OrganicAthlete, calls on athletes
    > to promote optimal health and ecological values. Just as organic farmers carefully monitor what
    > goes into their crops, organic athletes should similarly adapt their nutrition and lifestyle to
    > minimize harm and maximize regeneration and health.

    OOPS! Not so new -- The Linda McCartney Cycling Team beat you to it. And they established a
    reputation as a bunch of flakey touchy-feely types that couldn't make payroll at the end.

    Not that I expect the OP is actually reading any of this thread -- he's just spamming NGs with this
    stuff, then patting himself on the back as he sits down to eat a tofu burger.

    NS
     
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