New cyclist bike query - MTB or hybrid?



SteveMcC

New Member
Oct 9, 2004
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Hi,

With apologies in advance for asking such a basic question in comparison to some of the very detailed queries here, I plan to buy a bike over the next couple of weeks and am quite confused over whether to go for a mountain bike or a hybrid. Apparently 70% of the bikes sold here in the UK are MTBs although a lot of them are only used for commuting and other urban use. My brother-in-law has a Specialized Rockhopper which he loves, although it's used only in urban areas. I like the look of the Rockhopper too, although live in Croydon, Surrey without many mountains around!

Most of my cycling will, I guess, be either on roads, or in fairly gentle off-road conditions.

I'd really appreciate the views of members far more experienced than I on recommendations re types, and makes, of bikes for this type of use. I have around £600 to spend.

Incidentally, my interest in cycling has been sparked by my signing up to a Macmillan Cancer Relief cycle challenge in Ecuador next March in memory of my late parents (MTBs provided). In case anyone would be interested in sponsoring me my online sponsorship page can be found at www.justgiving.com/numbum.

Very best wishes to all,

Steve McCracken
 

Chris Bryson

New Member
Aug 4, 2003
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6
SteveMcC said:
Hi,

With apologies in advance for asking such a basic question in comparison to some of the very detailed queries here, I plan to buy a bike over the next couple of weeks and am quite confused over whether to go for a mountain bike or a hybrid. Apparently 70% of the bikes sold here in the UK are MTBs although a lot of them are only used for commuting and other urban use. My brother-in-law has a Specialized Rockhopper which he loves, although it's used only in urban areas. I like the look of the Rockhopper too, although live in Croydon, Surrey without many mountains around!

Most of my cycling will, I guess, be either on roads, or in fairly gentle off-road conditions.

I'd really appreciate the views of members far more experienced than I on recommendations re types, and makes, of bikes for this type of use. I have around £600 to spend.

Incidentally, my interest in cycling has been sparked by my signing up to a Macmillan Cancer Relief cycle challenge in Ecuador next March in memory of my late parents (MTBs provided). In case anyone would be interested in sponsoring me my online sponsorship page can be found at www.justgiving.com/numbum.

Very best wishes to all,

Steve McCracken
Reply
Hi
I bought a mountain bike for excercise when diagnosed with the big C about 10 years ago.
Ended up fitting mudguards and semi slick tyres to make it easier to use on roads-tend only to go on canal paths or cycleways and roads and light off road use. Ended up buying SH road bike for fun as its easier to use. With hindsight should have bought a hybrid, but I dont think they existed then.
If I had the cash I would swap both for something like a canondale road warrior.
Either way its a great way to get fit.

Cheers
 

HammerTD

New Member
Oct 13, 2004
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hybrid.

if you spend most of your time on pavement, hard pack dirt or gravel roads, there is no need for anything else. you dont need a mountain bike unless you are very rough on the bike, ie. jumping, or off roading through mud, rocks, roots, and other adverse conditions.
 

jcafcw

New Member
Apr 27, 2004
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How does the weight compare on Hybrid V MTB. I currently cycle to work on a MTB which is heavy. Are Hybrid's lighter - I can't use road bikes on London's roads they are full of pot holes, broken glass, impatient drivers. I need a bike strong enough to take the abuse it will get from London's roads but lighter so I can have a good ride when I get into the nicer suburbs.
 

jcjordan

New Member
Apr 5, 2004
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jcafcw said:
How does the weight compare on Hybrid V MTB. I currently cycle to work on a MTB which is heavy. Are Hybrid's lighter - I can't use road bikes on London's roads they are full of pot holes, broken glass, impatient drivers. I need a bike strong enough to take the abuse it will get from London's roads but lighter so I can have a good ride when I get into the nicer suburbs.
I currently have a Trek 7200fx Hybrid. Its a great bike if you want something that is lighter then a MTB and gets a better road speed, but every one and a while hit some rough stuff on your trips. Personaly i wish i had gotten a road bike (only a few $100 more and the 1500 will be mine!). Hybrid are still heavy(but lighter then a MTB), but alot faster then MTB's. If you use it for commuting then they are quite comfortable and do the job well.
 

Telegram Sam

New Member
Jul 14, 2004
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If you can find one that does not have a shock front end- they will be much lighter. I have the bottom Giant Cypress for beating up and throwing on the car and it is great- fairly light and with 80psi tires and 700c wheels, it fly's compared to my MTB- It also can take serious beatings, and I have ridden it on trails as well (had to true the wheels after). List it's like $300 or something and is really a trooper...with no suspension fork! I know the Biancha Avenue does not have suspension either- and with those big ol tires, who needs it.
I would also suggest a Cyclocross bike based on what you intend to ride, like the Bianchi Volpe, or Axis. These can really take a beating and are light light light...but you pay for that. They also come with more indestructable componentry then most hybrids, which are intended to tool around town. The Volpe is fairly inexpensive and built to last- be sure to ride one before you buy
Cheers
 

John Picton

New Member
Dec 3, 2003
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I've got the most basics of basics, the entry level Trek 7100fx hybrid. You can get it with fixed fork rather than the suspension, but the suspension has so many benefits for the general cycling you intend to do.

I also have a road bike, a Trek 1200. I wish now that I had a mountain bike and a road bike, so I would say that if you are fairly sure you will only buy one bike in the next couple of years then the hybrid is the way to go. If you feel rich and think you may ultimately go to a road bike aswell then I would get a mountain bike.
 

Telegram Sam

New Member
Jul 14, 2004
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John Picton said:
I've got the most basics of basics, the entry level Trek 7100fx hybrid. You can get it with fixed fork rather than the suspension, but the suspension has so many benefits for the general cycling you intend to do.
You really think so- I think all it does is weigh you down- with tires that big theres plenty of give and who needs the added weight???
 

ukmtk

New Member
Oct 12, 2004
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I have a MTB + road bike.

I will soon put flat bars onto the road bike to make it a hybrid. I mainly commute to work but like riding sat up on high quality bikes.

The trouble with MTBs on the road is that the gearing is "too easy" - i.e. it is OK for hills and stuff but on the flat you can't get enough "hard" gears. My MTB has 48T Deore on the front - that was the biggest I could find when I upgraded the group (mostly XT).

If you are quick you should be able to get a really nice Ridgeback Genesis Day 2 before the end of the year. They look like really nice hybrids.
 

John Picton

New Member
Dec 3, 2003
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Telegram Sam said:
You really think so- I think all it does is weigh you down- with tires that big theres plenty of give and who needs the added weight???

Yeah. To me the weight increase isn't that important, probably because my 10 year old Trek 700 with a steel frame got nicked and the insurance company replaced it with the 7100fx with the Aluminium frame. The newer model with suspension was still lighter than the old one, so I'm happy with that. I also generally ride it on my daily commute with the bike loaded with a rear rack pack and occaisonally a front bar bag along with the usual lights, pump, bottles and clutter, so as long as the bike doesn't weigh the same as a small elephant them I'm happy to have the comfort benefit of the front suspension. It's also great for dropping off kerbs in the city.

For quick road use, however, where speed is an issue, give me the road bike any day.
 

abbi

New Member
Aug 7, 2004
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Hey Steve,

Think about a Trek 7300 FX (no suspension and a good light frame makes for a very light hybrid) or, if you are willing to spend the money, get a road bike (used maybe? you can get a decent frame for cheap) and stick a straight bar on it like. The cost: ca. $100-150 if you need to get new shifters; I don't know what that is in pounds. If the road bike is old enough it will have the shifters on the down tube not on the handlebars, so changing the handle bar and stem is probably all you will need to do. The gearing will feel good for the road, but you can sit upright. Best is a cyclocross bike, but they're expensive (but light and fast).

Abbi
 

Opus54

New Member
Sep 12, 2004
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If you can do it, I'd go cyclocross. I had a Trek 7200 and was able to do hard pack dirt and trails as well as road but neither very well. I recently moved to an 05 Trek XO1. It does well enough on the road and gives me the ability jump onto a trail if I want.
 

kevindrive3

New Member
Feb 18, 2013
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Actually speaking it really doesn't matter if you are riding an MTB or hybrid if the distance is within 20 miles. Beyond 20 miles you can feel the difference in an MTB and a Hybrid. Certainly the gear ratio would be a difference as far as the speed is concerned and in Hybrids more inclined towards the road bikes the leaner tires with high pressures would lessen the road rolling resistance. So If you need speed Hybrid has an edge over MTB and in case you are planning for some off roading then you must go for MTB. <a href=http://www.pmstudy.com>PMP Training</a>
 

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