New cyclist here, i just crashed into a side walk curb! i have some questions...



ShaunPaul

New Member
Dec 27, 2018
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0
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Hello everyone,
I bought my self a vintage steel trek and this is my first road bike. The brakes are kinda shitty, I looked down to check my downtube shifters and then I realized I was about to crash into a sidewalk curb, I braked but I couldn't stop myself. I ended with my eblow and palm bleeding. The worst part is the pain from the shock.

I thought steel was suposed to be shock asorbing, whenever I ride on bumpy roads my bike vibrates like hell and it hurts the **** out of my hands. I feel like my body is attached to bike. Is it the wheels or maybe the tires? I'm running 85 psi on the front wheel and 90 on the back, I weigh 135lb.



Edit: 25C tires, some no name brand on the front and continental gaterskins on the back
 

dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
2,298
288
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You need to realize that when road bikes are discussed in terms of comfort, it’s always and only in relation to other (road) bikes.
Steel is generally considered shock absorbing in relation to otherwise comparable aluminium bikes. Which doesn’t prevent there from being some wickedly stiff steel bikes.
Most likely it’s your expectations that are at fault, and not your bike.
Pressure sounds about right for that tire width and your weight.
You can try going a little lower, but that might put you at risk of pinch flats.
Other things to try:
- wider tires, lower pressures
- double-wrapped bar
- tinker with bike fit. Saddle further back, shorter stem
- learn to ”go light”. Get out of saddle, ride over bumps standing. Legs and elbows slightly bent, let the bike move beneath you.
- some people use seat posts, bars and stems with supposedly significant comfort enchancing properties. Apart from those that are articulated and have actual damping elements, their efficiency is somewhat debated compared to the influence of varying the tire pressure/width/type.
 

ShaunPaul

New Member
Dec 27, 2018
4
0
1
31
You need to realize that when road bikes are discussed in terms of comfort, it’s always and only in relation to other (road) bikes.
Steel is generally considered shock absorbing in relation to otherwise comparable aluminium bikes. Which doesn’t prevent there from being some wickedly stiff steel bikes.
Most likely it’s your expectations that are at fault, and not your bike.
Pressure sounds about right for that tire width and your weight.
You can try going a little lower, but that might put you at risk of pinch flats.
Other things to try:
- wider tires, lower pressures
- double-wrapped bar
- tinker with bike fit. Saddle further back, shorter stem
- learn to ”go light”.Watch Movies Online CyberGhost ExpressVPN Get out of saddle, ride over bumps standing. Legs and elbows slightly bent, let the bike move beneath you.
- some people use seat posts, bars and stems with supposedly significant comfort enchancing properties. Apart from those that are articulated and have actual damping elements, their efficiency is somewhat debated compared to the influence of varying the tire pressure/width/type.
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My issue has been solved,.....
 

phillman5

Member
Aug 2, 2012
45
8
8
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My issue has been solved,.....

ShaunPaul. Its usually good etiquette here to say how you solved your problem.

When I started riding more seriously (but a few years after a Tucson, Az -> Ludington, Mi trip) and good steel bike, my hands got so bad I couldn't grip things. A good pair of gloves, and also good handlebar tape helps tremendously. It really too bad they don't make the Spenco gel gloves any more, they saved me.
 

cyclintom

Well-Known Member
Jan 15, 2011
1,277
194
63
ShaunPaul. Its usually good etiquette here to say how you solved your problem.

When I started riding more seriously (but a few years after a Tucson, Az -> Ludington, Mi trip) and good steel bike, my hands got so bad I couldn't grip things. A good pair of gloves, and also good handlebar tape helps tremendously. It really too bad they don't make the Spenco gel gloves any more, they saved me.
One thing you have to be very careful of is that the glove fingers have to be SHORTER than your fingers. Otherwise they will pinch between your fingers and cause that numbing effect that can get so bad that you can't shift. For short finger gloves the only one's I've gotten to work well are those leather ones with knit backs. The other ones might work OK for awhile but sooner or later you get the old numb fingers.