New cyclist puts on new tire and it looks funny....

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Twitchell, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. Twitchell

    Twitchell Guest

    Got my new front tire and just put it on but it doesn't look right. I ordered a
    26 X 1.50, same that was on it before, but the area around the stem doesn't seat
    all the way.

    Try as I did, it just wouldn't go down all the way. See pict.


    http://imgplace.com/image/view/30480db4539a4bfb40e0bc6a503b3715

    Any advise....I also got a 26 X 1 3/4 tire just in case the rim was for this
    kind of tire.

    twitch
     
    Tags:


  2. Deflate tube and workthe bead till its seated

    On Jun 12, 9:26 pm, Twitchell <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Got my new front tire and just put it on but it doesn't look right.  I ordered a
    > 26 X 1.50, same that was on it before, but the area around the stem doesn't seat
    > all the way.
    >
    > Try as I did, it just wouldn't go down all the way.  See pict.
    >
    > http://imgplace.com/image/view/30480db4539a4bfb40e0bc6a503b3715
    >
    > Any advise....I also got a 26 X 1 3/4 tire just in case the rim was for this
    > kind of tire.
    >
    > twitch
     
  3. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Deflate tube and workthe bead till its seated


    As Jim says - deflate the tube, push the filler in slightly, seat the tire
    around the innertube and pull the filler back down and re-inflate.
     
  4. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Twitchell <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Got my new front tire and just put it on but it doesn't look right.
    > I ordered a 26 X 1.50, same that was on it before, but the area
    > around the stem doesn't seat all the way.
    >
    > Try as I did, it just wouldn't go down all the way. See pict.
    >
    >
    > http://imgplace.com/image/view/30480db4539a4bfb40e0bc6a503b3715


    That's a common problem. What you've got is the base of the valve stem
    caught under the tire bead. Deflate the tire and push the valve into
    the tire until the base of the valve pops past the bead. Then reinflate
    partially and check the tire seating line line all the way around the
    tire. If the tire's in too low somewhere work it out with your thumb.
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Twitchell wrote:
    > Got my new front tire and just put it on but it doesn't look right. I ordered a
    > 26 X 1.50, same that was on it before, but the area around the stem doesn't seat
    > all the way.
    > Try as I did, it just wouldn't go down all the way. See pict.
    > http://imgplace.com/image/view/30480db4539a4bfb40e0bc6a503b3715
    > Any advise....I also got a 26 X 1 3/4 tire just in case the rim was for this
    > kind of tire.


    Push the valve up inside the tire; don't yank it into the rim. It's
    easy to catch the valve base under the tire's edge which would prevent
    the tire from seating properly.

    Your mountain bike rims are decimal (26x1.5, 26x1.9 26x2.2 etc) 559mm.
    26 x 1-3/4 fractional are a different series, 571mm.

    Ensure the rim liner is appropriate and centered so it does not occlude
    the tire seat surface in the rim. A mist of spray wax can help seat
    recalcitrant tires (car shops use soapy water which also works).
    --
    Andrew Muzi
    <www.yellowjersey.org/>
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
     
  6. Twitchell

    Twitchell Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Tom Kunich says...
    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> Deflate tube and workthe bead till its seated

    >
    >As Jim says - deflate the tube, push the filler in slightly, seat the tire
    >around the innertube and pull the filler back down and re-inflate.
    >

    It took a couple of tries but it finally seated....thanks much..

    twitch
     
  7. On Jun 12, 9:53 pm, Twitchell <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It took a couple of tries but it finally seated....thanks much.


    That valve interference problem is why I start (sometimes, anyhow)
    with the tube pumped up (with a pump, not my mouth) with just about
    enough air to come to the size/shape it's going to be when inflated to
    normal pressure inside the mounted tire. Get the valve area seated,
    put the tire on as far as possible, working on both sides, and let the
    air out if the last bit is difficult. If the last few inches of tire
    are real tight, you might have to squeeze the beads together, making
    the beads as "short" as possible while working around the tire,
    pulling toward the area that isn't on yet, to get them over the edge
    of the rim.

    Or you can do one bead at a time, putting the tube in after one bead
    is seated all the way around. I still start at the valve because it's
    easier that way.

    I've read advice to the contrary, that the valve area gets seated
    last. Maybe the idea there is that the reenforced (thicker) area
    around the base of the valve stem is supposed to help seat the tire?
    Oh well, not the way that works for me. --D-y
     
  8. Twitchell

    Twitchell Guest

    In article <[email protected]m>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >On Jun 12, 9:53=A0pm, Twitchell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> It took a couple of tries but it finally seated....thanks much.

    >
    >That valve interference problem is why I start (sometimes, anyhow)
    >with the tube pumped up (with a pump, not my mouth) with just about
    >enough air to come to the size/shape it's going to be when inflated to
    >normal pressure inside the mounted tire. Get the valve area seated,
    >put the tire on as far as possible, working on both sides, and let the
    >air out if the last bit is difficult. If the last few inches of tire
    >are real tight, you might have to squeeze the beads together, making
    >the beads as "short" as possible while working around the tire,
    >pulling toward the area that isn't on yet, to get them over the edge
    >of the rim.
    >
    >Or you can do one bead at a time, putting the tube in after one bead
    >is seated all the way around. I still start at the valve because it's
    >easier that way.
    >
    >I've read advice to the contrary, that the valve area gets seated
    >last. Maybe the idea there is that the reenforced (thicker) area
    >around the base of the valve stem is supposed to help seat the tire?
    >Oh well, not the way that works for me. --D-y


    I actually put the tire on with the tube partially inflated (very little but it
    did have some air). Anyway, I noticed right from the start that the area around
    the valve stem didn't seat right. I started putting on the tire starting from
    the valve...maybe I shouldn't have.

    I'm a 63 year old newbie at this with artificial hips....mistakes are expected.

    twitch
     
  9. Dan O

    Dan O Guest

    On Jun 13, 8:06 am, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jun 12, 9:53 pm, Twitchell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > It took a couple of tries but it finally seated....thanks much.

    >
    > That valve interference problem is why I start (sometimes, anyhow)
    > with the tube pumped up (with a pump, not my mouth) with just about
    > enough air to come to the size/shape it's going to be when inflated to
    > normal pressure inside the mounted tire. Get the valve area seated,
    > put the tire on as far as possible, working on both sides, and let the
    > air out if the last bit is difficult. If the last few inches of tire
    > are real tight, you might have to squeeze the beads together, making
    > the beads as "short" as possible while working around the tire,
    > pulling toward the area that isn't on yet, to get them over the edge
    > of the rim.
    >
    > Or you can do one bead at a time, putting the tube in after one bead
    > is seated all the way around. I still start at the valve because it's
    > easier that way.
    >
    > I've read advice to the contrary, that the valve area gets seated
    > last. Maybe the idea there is that the reenforced (thicker) area
    > around the base of the valve stem is supposed to help seat the tire?


    The idea is that the already mounted bead is free to move down into
    the center of the rim, offering more slack than if the valve stem was
    in the way.
     
  10. Tosspot

    Tosspot Guest

    Twitchell wrote:
    > Got my new front tire and just put it on but it doesn't look right. I ordered a
    > 26 X 1.50, same that was on it before, but the area around the stem doesn't seat
    > all the way.
    >
    > Try as I did, it just wouldn't go down all the way. See pict.
    >
    >
    > http://imgplace.com/image/view/30480db4539a4bfb40e0bc6a503b3715
    >
    > Any advise....I also got a 26 X 1 3/4 tire just in case the rim was for this
    > kind of tire.


    You got the Loopy Lou's! I did that once and didn't notice, 'twas a
    very odd sensation cycling on it.
     
  11. Frank Leake wrote:

    >> Got my new front tire and just put it on but it doesn't look right.
    >> I ordered a 26 X 1.50, same that was on it before, but the area
    >> around the stem doesn't seat all the way.


    >> Try as I did, it just wouldn't go down all the way. See picture.


    http://imgplace.com/image/view/30480db4539a4bfb40e0bc6a503b3715

    >> Any advise... I also got a 26 X 1 3/4 tire just in case the rim
    >> was for this kind of tire.


    > You got the Loopy Lou's! I did that once and didn't notice, 'twas a
    > very odd sensation cycling on it.


    Advice:

    This is common with most inner tubes. The way to do avoid the problem
    is to push the valve stem up into the tire after mounting it so that
    it can descend with its attachment pad curved to fit between tire
    casing walls instead of having the tire crimping the tube at either
    side and sitting on top of the reinforcement. That crimp can cause a
    puncture in a short distance.

    Presta valves are slenderer with a thinner attachment pad making them
    are easier to install.

    Jobst Brandt
     
  12. On Jun 13, 11:13 am, Dan O <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The idea is that the already mounted bead is free to move down into
    > the center of the rim, offering more slack than if the valve stem was
    > in the way.


    Then it's in the way when the tire is the tightest. True, there is a
    thicker area in the tube around the valve, which might resist pinching
    with tire levers a little better, but it's pretty small.

    FWIW, Park Tools "help" site starts with the valve, too. So it goes in
    straight, is their point. I like "straight" OK, but my main thing,
    learned 30-odd years ago when I started using Presta valves on "narrow
    high pressure clinchers", was the discovery ("field operations") that
    the Presta valve wouldn't take much abuse, compared to the old
    Schrader valves, IRT poking/pulling/moving around after they were
    mounted and didn't go on quite right-- especially poking and pulling.
    So, I made the valve happy by setting it in the tire with a little air
    pressure (pump, not mouth even though you can with Presta!) the same
    or very close to the way it would be when fully inflated-- including a
    straight valve, of course. Which helps when the valve stem is just
    about long enough to work with a deep(er)-section modern rim. Although
    I do carry a couple of extenders along with the camp stove and three
    days' rations in the seatbag. --D-y
     
  13. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Twitchell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I'm a 63 year old newbie at this with artificial hips....mistakes are
    > expected.


    That doesn't mean you aren't going to catch heck from everyone for them.....
     
  14. Peter Howard

    Peter Howard Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >A mist of spray wax can help seat recalcitrant tires (car shops use soapy
    >water which also works).
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi
    > <www.yellowjersey.org/>
    > Open every day since 1 April, 1971
    > ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **


    I always enjoy reading discussions like this to check on my own practices.
    I've never used any sort of tire fitting lubricant on bicycle tires myself,
    mainly through fear of contaminating the rubber with something that might
    perish it, or having a tire that will slip on the rim. Though I'm not sure
    if bicycle tires can slip around the rim the way offroad motorcycle tyres
    will. What exactly is this spray wax? What's the brand name and what else is
    it used for?

    Digressing a little, I've been putting off mounting a pair of Schwalbe
    Marathon Plus's on my new 26" Velocity rimmed wheels because I've heard all
    about how recalcitrant they can be. When I finally achieved the requisite
    Zen-like state of calm and attempted it, it was a huge anticlimax. The
    things practically fell on by themselves and for the first time ever, I did
    not need a little help from a tire lever for the last six inches of bead. It
    seemed to me that the Schwalbes are so fat and stiff that I was able to get
    a good double handful of the tire and rotate it away from me to pop that
    last bit of bead over the edge. Or maybe I was just lucky.

    Peter H.
     
  15. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> A mist of spray wax can help seat recalcitrant tires (car shops use
    >> soapy water which also works).


    Peter Howard wrote:
    > I always enjoy reading discussions like this to check on my own
    > practices. I've never used any sort of tire fitting lubricant on bicycle
    > tires myself, mainly through fear of contaminating the rubber with
    > something that might perish it, or having a tire that will slip on the
    > rim. Though I'm not sure if bicycle tires can slip around the rim the
    > way offroad motorcycle tyres will. What exactly is this spray wax?
    > What's the brand name and what else is it used for?
    >
    > Digressing a little, I've been putting off mounting a pair of Schwalbe
    > Marathon Plus's on my new 26" Velocity rimmed wheels because I've heard
    > all about how recalcitrant they can be. When I finally achieved the
    > requisite Zen-like state of calm and attempted it, it was a huge
    > anticlimax. The things practically fell on by themselves and for the
    > first time ever, I did not need a little help from a tire lever for the
    > last six inches of bead. It seemed to me that the Schwalbes are so fat
    > and stiff that I was able to get a good double handful of the tire and
    > rotate it away from me to pop that last bit of bead over the edge. Or
    > maybe I was just lucky.


    Pledge.
    Especially on over/under sized or rusty steel rims
    --
    Andrew Muzi
    <www.yellowjersey.org/>
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **
     
  16. landotter

    landotter Guest

    On Jun 14, 10:02 am, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >> A mist of spray wax can help seat recalcitrant tires (car shops use
    > >> soapy water which also works).

    > Peter Howard wrote:
    > > I always enjoy reading discussions like this to check on my own
    > > practices. I've never used any sort of tire fitting lubricant on bicycle
    > > tires myself, mainly through fear of contaminating the rubber with
    > > something that might perish it, or having a tire that will slip on the
    > > rim. Though I'm not sure if bicycle tires can slip around the rim the
    > > way offroad motorcycle tyres will. What exactly is this spray wax?
    > > What's the brand name and what else is it used for?

    >
    > > Digressing a little, I've been putting off mounting a pair of Schwalbe
    > > Marathon Plus's on my new 26" Velocity rimmed wheels because I've heard
    > > all about how recalcitrant they can be. When I finally achieved the
    > > requisite Zen-like state of calm and attempted it, it was a huge
    > > anticlimax. The things practically fell on by themselves and for the
    > > first time ever, I did not need a little help from a tire lever for the
    > > last six inches of bead. It seemed to me that the Schwalbes are so fat
    > > and stiff that I was able to get a good double handful of the tire and
    > > rotate it away from me to pop that last bit of bead over the edge. Or
    > > maybe I was just lucky.

    >
    > Pledge.
    > Especially on over/under sized or rusty steel rims
    > --


    Alternately, use those little soaps you've stolen from roadside motels
    to lube the rim. Good to keep a sliver in your flat kit if you have a
    tight tire. Nice if you end up far from home with dirty hands as well.
     
  17. Peter Howard

    Peter Howard Guest

    "landotter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]m...
    > On Jun 14, 10:02 am, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> >> A mist of spray wax can help seat recalcitrant tires (car shops use
    >> >> soapy water which also works).

    >> Peter Howard wrote:
    >> > I always enjoy reading discussions like this to check on my own
    >> > practices. I've never used any sort of tire fitting lubricant on
    >> > bicycle
    >> > tires myself, mainly through fear of contaminating the rubber with
    >> > something that might perish it, or having a tire that will slip on the
    >> > rim. Though I'm not sure if bicycle tires can slip around the rim the
    >> > way offroad motorcycle tyres will. What exactly is this spray wax?
    >> > What's the brand name and what else is it used for?

    >>
    >> > Digressing a little, I've been putting off mounting a pair of Schwalbe
    >> > Marathon Plus's on my new 26" Velocity rimmed wheels because I've heard
    >> > all about how recalcitrant they can be. When I finally achieved the
    >> > requisite Zen-like state of calm and attempted it, it was a huge
    >> > anticlimax. The things practically fell on by themselves and for the
    >> > first time ever, I did not need a little help from a tire lever for the
    >> > last six inches of bead. It seemed to me that the Schwalbes are so fat
    >> > and stiff that I was able to get a good double handful of the tire and
    >> > rotate it away from me to pop that last bit of bead over the edge. Or
    >> > maybe I was just lucky.

    >>
    >> Pledge.
    >> Especially on over/under sized or rusty steel rims



    Ah, thank you. We have Pledge in Australia, though only in our huge Home
    Depot-like local hardware chain that imports all the US made household
    products such as Simple Green. If it's good enough for you I'll certainly
    try it.


    >
    > Alternately, use those little soaps you've stolen from roadside motels
    > to lube the rim. Good to keep a sliver in your flat kit if you have a
    > tight tire. Nice if you end up far from home with dirty hands as well.
    >


    Got little soaps too. I have a million of them that live in my workshop for
    lubricating handsaws and drill bits.

    PH
    >
     
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