New cyclist - question about pedals

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by srixon, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. srixon

    srixon New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all, just as a quick introduction I purchased my first road bike on the weekend. I do a fair bit of running and wanted to get a road bike for some training this summer and to get into triathlons and some long rides next year. After checking out what my local shops had for entry level bikes, I ended up getting a used bike which allowed me to get a bike with better components for a lower price.

    I got a 2006 Specialized Roubaix (base model, http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=21766&menuItemId=0) for $500. The bike is in great shape and fits me well, so I think I got a pretty good deal on this bike (hopefully you all agree, I can't take it back now!)

    The one thing that the bike is missing are the pedals. I've taken a quick look but I'm wondering what the real difference is between the lower and higher end pedals? Is it just a difference in the materials and weight, or do the higher end pedals somehow perform better? I was going to get a set of Evo WPD 823 pedals, but I wanted to get a better idea of what type of difference the pedals can make.

    Thanks in advance, I can't wait to really get into cycling!
     
    Tags:


  2. coneofsilence

    coneofsilence Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    7
    If you have knee issues be sure to get cleats and pedals that allow enough float so that you foot can be free floating but doesn't allow your foot to come free from the pedal.
    For me personally, pedals aren't really important, its the shoes i buy that make or break a bike ride. Your feet have to be comfortable and the right shoe makes the world of difference. Like running, be sure to get a shoe that fits your foot.
     
  3. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,639
    Likes Received:
    70
    If you are planning on using platform pedals I would recommend Cannondale Grind pedals. These work very good with sneakers. The replaceable studs in the platform grip really well. The platform area is quite large so you have almost an infinate amount of riding positions. You can use your running shoes as riding shoes so you wont have a need of getting more shoes.
    If you are looking to clip in Look makes very good pedals. The Look Keo Easy pedal is reasonably priced and is good for entry to intermediate level riders. If you do go this route as previously stated make sure you get shoes that fit.
     
  4. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Messages:
    10,590
    Likes Received:
    333
    A moderately priced pedal works fine. A high end expensive pedal weighs less.
     
  5. OldGoat

    OldGoat New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    390
    Likes Received:
    2
    Agree with davereo's suggestion re Look KeO's.
     
  6. srixon

    srixon New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the input everyone. I'm definitely planning on going with a set of clipless pedals so I will take a look at the Look KeO Easy pedals.
     
  7. Phil85207

    Phil85207 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you are going to do a tri, then I would go with Speedplay, no question. There is a reason that most of them use them. They are a stomp and go style and after a little learning and break in by far the easiest to use. They have great customer service and you don't have to spend a fortune either. The tri choice by far is the Speedplay zero, and that would be my suggestion.
     
  8. coneofsilence

    coneofsilence Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    7
    Most Triathletes don't need to clip in and out. Most of them leave there shoes connected to the bike.
     
Loading...
Loading...