New edition of Cyclecraft - cover is a triumph



marc wrote:
>
>> "Not wearing a head saved my life™"
>>
>>

> By not wearing a head, my overall height is lower , so I avoided an
> accident that I would have had if I had a head?
>
> No head means less rotational torque?


Indeed. And there is also another effect - the head is a significant
proportion of the whole body mass, and by removing that mass you will
lower the centre of gravity and therefore make the cyclist/bike
combination more stable.

http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2006/centerofmass.shtml
 
"Stephen Patterson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:D[email protected]...
> On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 11:01:44 +0000, Geraint Jones wrote:
>
>> Surely one doesn't wear gloves just because of the cold?
>>
>> I certainly wear heavier gloves in cold weather, but I
>> feel undressed without the unlined goat-leather gloves
>> on a hot summer's day.

>
> and I often wear gloves because the handlebar grips get sticky when
> there's even a suggestion of moisture in the air.


I wear gloves even if the day is hot as I get cold hands very easily - even
on a hot day my hands can be cold due to the wind effect of the forward
motion.
 
On Jun 6, 2:40 pm, "wafflycat" <w*a*ff£y£cat*@£btco*nn£ect.com> wrote:
> I wear gloves even if the day is hot as I get cold hands very easily - even
> on a hot day my hands can be cold due to the wind effect of the forward
> motion.


"wind effect of the forward motion"? Lucky you: I only ever seem to
get "wind effect of a head wind", whichever way I go!

PhilD

--
<><
 
"wafflycat" <w*a*ff£y£cat*@£btco*nn£ect.com>typed


> I wear gloves even if the day is hot as I get cold hands very easily - even
> on a hot day my hands can be cold due to the wind effect of the forward
> motion.


Wearing fingerless gloves in summer rain keeps fingers warm enough to
dry rubber solution should the p******e f**** pay you a visit on your
travels. She visited me once when I was unable to remove the inner tube,
so replacement was not an option...

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
Stephen Patterson <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 11:01:44 +0000, Geraint Jones wrote:
>
> > Surely one doesn't wear gloves just because of the cold?
> >
> > I certainly wear heavier gloves in cold weather, but I
> > feel undressed without the unlined goat-leather gloves
> > on a hot summer's day.

>
> and I often wear gloves because the handlebar grips get sticky when
> there's even a suggestion of moisture in the air.


I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
consider de rigueur for cycling.

Cheers,
Luke


--
Red Rose Ramblings, the diary of an Essex boy in
exile in Lancashire <http://www.shrimper.org.uk>
 
[email protected] (Ekul Namsob)typed


> Stephen Patterson <[email protected]> wrote:


> > On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 11:01:44 +0000, Geraint Jones wrote:
> >
> > > Surely one doesn't wear gloves just because of the cold?
> > >
> > > I certainly wear heavier gloves in cold weather, but I
> > > feel undressed without the unlined goat-leather gloves
> > > on a hot summer's day.

> >
> > and I often wear gloves because the handlebar grips get sticky when
> > there's even a suggestion of moisture in the air.


> I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
> consider de rigueur for cycling.


Will you be on the ride on Saturday, then? ;-)

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
In article <1hzat0d.1svpj24q6jsodN%
[email protected]>, Ekul Namsob
[email protected] says...
> Stephen Patterson <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 11:01:44 +0000, Geraint Jones wrote:
> >
> > > Surely one doesn't wear gloves just because of the cold?
> > >
> > > I certainly wear heavier gloves in cold weather, but I
> > > feel undressed without the unlined goat-leather gloves
> > > on a hot summer's day.

> >
> > and I often wear gloves because the handlebar grips get sticky when
> > there's even a suggestion of moisture in the air.

>
> I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> unforgiving.


Keep adding layers of bar tape until they're comfy. :)
 
Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]> wrote:

> [email protected] (Ekul Namsob)typed


> > I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> > unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
> > consider de rigueur for cycling.

>
> Will you be on the ride on Saturday, then? ;-)


No. Too much chance of important bits getting caught in the gearing.

Cheers,
Luke


--
Red Rose Ramblings, the diary of an Essex boy in
exile in Lancashire <http://www.shrimper.org.uk>
 
[email protected] (Ekul Namsob)typed


> Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]> wrote:


> > [email protected] (Ekul Namsob)typed


> > > I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> > > unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
> > > consider de rigueur for cycling.

> >
> > Will you be on the ride on Saturday, then? ;-)


> No. Too much chance of important bits getting caught in the gearing.


> Cheers,
> Luke



I'm sure many riders wear shoes...

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
Quoting Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]>:
>Will you be on the ride on Saturday, then? ;-)


I will, if any other urcers are going. Brown tandem old enough to have a
level top tube, short girl on the back who's extremely LOUD.
--
OPTIONS=name:Kirsty,menustyle:C,female,lit_corridor,standout,time,showexp,hilit
e_pet,catname:Akane,dogname:Ryoga,fruit:eek:konomiyaki,pickup_types:"!$?=/,scores:
5 top/2 around,color,boulder:0,autoquiver,autodig,disclose:yiyayvygyc,pickup_bu
rden:burdened,!cmdassist,msg_window:reversed,!sparkle,horsename:Rumiko,showrace
 
Ekul Namsob wrote:

> I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
> consider de rigueur for cycling.


Wouldn't it be better to address the cause rather than fiddle with the
symptoms?

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]> wrote:

> [email protected] (Ekul Namsob)typed
>
>
> > Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]> wrote:

>
> > > [email protected] (Ekul Namsob)typed

>
> > > > I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> > > > unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
> > > > consider de rigueur for cycling.
> > >
> > > Will you be on the ride on Saturday, then? ;-)

>
> > No. Too much chance of important bits getting caught in the gearing.


> I'm sure many riders wear shoes...


You mean that don't screw the cleats directly into their feet?

Cheers,
Luke

--
Red Rose Ramblings, the diary of an Essex boy in
exile in Lancashire <http://www.shrimper.org.uk>
 
Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:

> Ekul Namsob wrote:
>
> > I wear gloves when riding my Ribble just because my handlebars are so
> > unforgiving. They are, right now, about the only item of clothing I
> > consider de rigueur for cycling.

>
> Wouldn't it be better to address the cause rather than fiddle with the
> symptoms?


Maybe. However, it seems easier to wear gloves which will absorb
vibration and perspiration and which are washable than to fiddle with
the handlebar tape and remove it for frequent washing.

Cheers,
Luke


--
Red Rose Ramblings, the diary of an Essex boy in
exile in Lancashire <http://www.shrimper.org.uk>
 
Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:

> I'm sure many riders wear shoes...
>


I have often heard riders turning up for races in cars being rather
unhappy because they left their shoes at home ...
 
David Damerell wrote:
> Quoting Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]>:
>>Will you be on the ride on Saturday, then? ;-)

>
> I will, if any other urcers are going. Brown tandem old enough to have a
> level top tube, short girl on the back who's extremely LOUD.


I hope to be on the London ride, but probably won't be.

There's a unicycle hockey tournament in London on the same day. I'll
get a lift to London for the tournament and if my team can spare me
(which currently looks unlikely) then I'll do the ride.

I'm as yet undecided which unicycle to use. If the average speed is
likely to be < 6mph then the 20" would be best (which would be handy,
because that's the one I use for hockey). If it's likely to be > 8mph
then the 26" would be better.

--
Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
Reply address is valid, but that on my website is checked more often
"Daddy, put that down. Daddy, put that down. Daddy, put that down.
Daddy, why did you put that down?" - Charlie Colyer, age 2
 
Dan Gregory <[email protected]>typed


> Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:


> > I'm sure many riders wear shoes...
> >


> I have often heard riders turning up for races in cars being rather
> unhappy because they left their shoes at home ...


A certain eminent Audax rider was DNS when she turned up by car with two
left shoes...

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
Quoting Danny Colyer <[email protected]>:
>I'm as yet undecided which unicycle to use. If the average speed is
>likely to be < 6mph then the 20" would be best (which would be handy,
>because that's the one I use for hockey). If it's likely to be > 8mph
>then the 26" would be better.


Well, it's 6 miles, start at 15:30, afterparty organised to start 17:00 15
minutes' ride away... I suspect the speed is almost precisely in your
unsweet spot.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
Today is First Brieday, June.
 
David Damerell wrote:
> Well, it's 6 miles, start at 15:30, afterparty organised to start 17:00 15
> minutes' ride away... I suspect the speed is almost precisely in your
> unsweet spot.


Seems like the 20" will be the best bet, and take a hockey stick along
to lean on during the inevitable stops (repeated idling on slow rides
gets *very* tiring after a while).

The 20" is comfortable at about 4-8mph, it's far more practical at lower
speeds than the 26" and, if necessary, I can get up to about 14mph for
short periods.

--
Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
Reply address is valid, but that on my website is checked more often
"Daddy, put that down. Daddy, put that down. Daddy, put that down.
Daddy, why did you put that down?" - Charlie Colyer, age 2
 
Quoting Danny Colyer <[email protected]>:
>David Damerell wrote:
>>Well, it's 6 miles, start at 15:30, afterparty organised to start 17:00 15
>>minutes' ride away... I suspect the speed is almost precisely in your
>>unsweet spot.

>Seems like the 20" will be the best bet, and take a hockey stick along
>to lean on during the inevitable stops


I saw two tallbikes and one other tandem, but no unicyclists.

Our luck was not in. We got a flat in Trafalgar Square which dropped us
off the back - we rode quickly up to the tail end of the ride crossing
Waterloo Bridge - but then near Tottenham Court Road the drive chain
broke. I've never broken a chain before.

So we put on our clothes and went home. Bah.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> Distortion Field!
Today is First Stilday, June - a weekend.
 
In news:[email protected],
Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to
tell us:
> Dan Gregory <[email protected]>typed
>
>
>> Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:

>
>>> I'm sure many riders wear shoes...
>>>

>
>> I have often heard riders turning up for races in cars being rather
>> unhappy because they left their shoes at home ...

>
> A certain eminent Audax rider was DNS when she turned up by car with
> two left shoes...


And a certain Eminent Bicycle Designer was a DNS in an HPV race when he
turned up by car with the front wheels of his recumbent trike left sitting
in the road outside his house :)

--
Dave Larrington
<http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk>
It is impossible to eat a banana without looking like a tw*t.
 

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