New Giant Bikes

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Badger South, Oct 21, 2003.

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  1. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see this
    strange bike on their homepage.

    Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>

    ISTM, this is up there with that autoshifter you see sometimes on late night TV. Can anyone here
    imagine that this is gonna be the 'bike of the future'.

    I don't know a lot about it besides watching the video on the site, but it seems they've put a lot
    into this, especially to have it featured on the main page. (Except for their already good rep, I'd
    wonder if this wouldn't this turn away potentially serious riders)

    -B

    --
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  2. What's wrong with them putting a semi-recumbent together?

    There are a lot of potential benefits to recumbents; one major drawback is their relative rarity
    and, thus, high prices. If a major bike manufacturer like Giant wants to build a recumbent, more
    power and good luck too them.

    My LBS has sold a few this year.

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:50:22 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:

    >I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see
    >this strange bike on their homepage.
    >
    >Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>
    >
    >ISTM, this is up there with that autoshifter you see sometimes on late night TV. Can anyone here
    >imagine that this is gonna be the 'bike of the future'.
    >
    >I don't know a lot about it besides watching the video on the site, but it seems they've put a lot
    >into this, especially to have it featured on the main page. (Except for their already good rep, I'd
    >wonder if this wouldn't this turn away potentially serious riders)
    >
    >-B
     
  3. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Badger South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see
    > this strange bike on their homepage.
    >
    > Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>
    >
    > ISTM, this is up there with that autoshifter you see sometimes on late night TV. Can anyone here
    > imagine that this is gonna be the 'bike of the future'.
    >
    > I don't know a lot about it besides watching the video on the site, but it seems they've put a lot
    > into this, especially to have it featured on the main page. (Except for their already good rep,
    > I'd wonder if this wouldn't this turn away potentially serious riders)

    Um...to what are you referring? (OK, I gather it's a recumbent from first replier, but a link would
    have helped.)

    Bill "not everyone will go find Giant site to see what you mean" S.
     
  4. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >What's wrong with them putting a semi-recumbent together?
    >
    >There are a lot of potential benefits to recumbents; one major drawback is their relative rarity
    >and, thus, high prices. If a major bike manufacturer like Giant wants to build a recumbent, more
    >power and good luck too them.
    >
    >My LBS has sold a few this year.

    Nothing 'wrong', really, just a light-hearted query, wondering if you can do serious riding with
    these, that's all.

    -B
    --
    Email Replies to johnson<nospm>01j <att> ntelos <dott> net
     
  5. On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 16:30:55 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Luigi de Guzman
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>What's wrong with them putting a semi-recumbent together?
    >>
    >>There are a lot of potential benefits to recumbents; one major drawback is their relative rarity
    >>and, thus, high prices. If a major bike manufacturer like Giant wants to build a recumbent, more
    >>power and good luck too them.
    >>
    >>My LBS has sold a few this year.
    >
    >Nothing 'wrong', really, just a light-hearted query, wondering if you can do serious riding with
    >these, that's all.
    >

    well, you're not UCI legal and you won't be hitting the singletrack with it anytime soon....

    But it'll get you from point A to point B as fast as you would care. And serious depends on you,
    I guess....

    >-B
     
  6. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Sorni <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Badger South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see
    >> this strange bike on their homepage.
    >>
    >> Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>
    >>
    >> ISTM, this is up there with that autoshifter you see sometimes on late night TV. Can anyone here
    >> imagine that this is gonna be the 'bike of the future'.
    >>
    >> I don't know a lot about it besides watching the video on the site, but it seems they've put a
    >> lot into this, especially to have it featured on the main page. (Except for their already good
    >> rep, I'd wonder if this wouldn't this turn away potentially serious riders)
    >
    >Um...to what are you referring? (OK, I gather it's a recumbent from first replier, but a link would
    >have helped.)
    >
    >Bill "not everyone will go find Giant site to see what you mean" S.

    Sorry man, my bad. I normally would have put a link, but didn't want to seem presumptuous or insult
    anyone's cred being on a cycling group. ;-)

    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/

    HTH.

    Best, -B

    --
    Email Replies to johnson<nospm>01j <att> ntelos <dott> net
     
  7. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 16:30:55 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>, Luigi de Guzman
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>What's wrong with them putting a semi-recumbent together?
    > >>
    > >>There are a lot of potential benefits to recumbents; one major drawback is their relative rarity
    > >>and, thus, high prices. If a major bike manufacturer like Giant wants to build a recumbent, more
    > >>power and good luck too them.
    > >>
    > >>My LBS has sold a few this year.
    > >
    > >Nothing 'wrong', really, just a light-hearted query, wondering if you can do serious riding with
    > >these, that's all.
    > >
    >
    > well, you're not UCI legal and you won't be hitting the singletrack with it anytime soon....
    >
    > But it'll get you from point A to point B as fast as you would care. And serious depends on you, I
    > guess....

    To some people, the lower height-of-eye on a recumbent bothers them when riding in traffic. Others
    have no problem with it. Depends on what you like...

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  8. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > > But it'll get you from point A to point B as fast as you would care. And serious depends on you,
    > > I guess....
    >
    > To some people, the lower height-of-eye on a recumbent bothers them when riding in traffic. Others
    > have no problem with it. Depends on what you like...

    I rode one the other day. The semi-recumbent position keeps your head up, though not as high as an
    upright, it's pretty close.

    These things are not geared high enough to be speed demons. I found myself wanting two or three more
    to go faster.....

    It takes a bit of getting used to. The geometry makes it squirrelly if you put weight on the bars.
    You have to ride like you are driving a car with power steering. A light touch will do.

    Neat bike for a Sunday cruise around the neighborhood with the family. But pretty much worthless
    everywhere else.

    -Buck
     
  9. Mp

    Mp Guest

    Assuming you're writing about the "Revive", I actually saw a television commercial for these a while
    ago. Not sure how long ago, it might even have been while watching the TDF coverage on OLN.

    Looks like Giant is going after the "I'd like to ride a bike but . . " crowd. If I see one in a bike
    shop, though, I'll definitely ask for a test ride.

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:50:22 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:

    >I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see
    >this strange bike on their homepage.
    >
    >Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>
    >
    >ISTM, this is up there with that autoshifter you see sometimes on late night TV. Can anyone here
    >imagine that this is gonna be the 'bike of the future'.
    >
    >I don't know a lot about it besides watching the video on the site, but it seems they've put a lot
    >into this, especially to have it featured on the main page. (Except for their already good rep, I'd
    >wonder if this wouldn't this turn away potentially serious riders)
    >
    >-B
     
  10. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Badger South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see
    > this strange bike on their homepage.
    >
    > Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>

    Electra, the cruiser people, have a new bike for this market as well.
    http://www.electrabike.com/townie/home_new.html

    It's more conventional looking but the geometry seems to be a lot like the Giant's. Electra makes
    much of the riders' ability to reach the ground with their feet, and their theory seems to be that
    this is a significant barrier to some people taking up cycling. I suppose that's true. You certainly
    see a lot of awkward-looking people riding bikes with the saddles far too low for this very reason.

    RichC
     
  11. On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:50:22 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:

    >
    >
    >Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>

    Try one some time.

    We have one at the shop, and it's an absolute blast to ride.

    Barry
     
  12. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rich Clark
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"Badger South" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I was looking up some brands of Giant Mtn bikes for comparison shopping and was startled to see
    >> this strange bike on their homepage.
    >>
    >> Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>
    >
    >Electra, the cruiser people, have a new bike for this market as well.
    >http://www.electrabike.com/townie/home_new.html
    >
    >It's more conventional looking but the geometry seems to be a lot like the Giant's. Electra makes
    >much of the riders' ability to reach the ground with their feet, and their theory seems to be that
    >this is a significant barrier to some people taking up cycling. I suppose that's true. You
    >certainly see a lot of awkward-looking people riding bikes with the saddles far too low for this
    >very reason.
    >
    >RichC

    Sounds about right. Heh, even though I had some experience riding in my teens and early 30s, I had
    my seat way too low for about a month.

    Had to raise it two inches several weeks ago. Dain Bramage; yeah that's the ticket. ;-) I -still-
    think I have it too low, but it's better. I raised it another 1/2 inch today and shaved a minute off
    the part of my course that I time (about 3-4 miles)

    The interesting thing, though is I'm working harder now, even though there's less stress on the
    legs, breathing harder, spinning faster. I was working at -very- low efficiency, apparently, and the
    perceived exertion was such that I couldn't spin right, or really push it.

    Of course I've also lost a bit more weight due to the head cold and harder workouts in the
    past months.

    I haven't seen those Giant bikes anywhere to test 'em. My Trek shop says they're Chinese made, and
    don't have the lifetime warranty so they won't even carry Giant. Just Trek, Fisher (made by Trek, I
    think), and some others I'm not familiar with, probably customs.

    -B
    --
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  13. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, B a r r y B u r k e J r .
    <*removethis*[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 14:50:22 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>Is this for real, or has Giant flipped out? <grin>
    >
    >Try one some time.
    >
    >We have one at the shop, and it's an absolute blast to ride.
    >
    >Barry

    OK, where's your shop? ;-)

    I imagine it _is_ fun to ride, but have you made it so easy and efficient that you've taken the
    'exercise' part out of the biking equation? <g> That's just -rong-!

    They did a nice job on the video at their site, and it sure makes a lot of sense, upright posture,
    better ergonomic angle for the legs.

    Do you think anyone besides comfort riders will purchase one? I just have trouble seeing it as
    becoming mainstream, although it does seem like it has the potential to step ahead of the classic
    recumbent.

    -B
    --
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  14. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, B a r r y B u r k e J r .
    <*removethis*[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 21:48:19 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Badger South) wrote:
    >>
    >>OK, where's your shop? ;-)
    >
    >Middletown, CT
    >
    >http://www.pedalpowerct.com
    >
    >Barry

    OK, that's a bit far for me. Maybe if we go skiing next winter, though? ;-)

    -B (ps site wouldn't load for me...)
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  15. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    > Do you think anyone besides comfort riders will purchase one? I just have trouble seeing it as
    > becoming mainstream, although it does seem like it has the potential to step ahead of the classic
    > recumbent.
    >
    Giant's made recumbents for a while. I think they did most of BikeE's production (the lower priced
    models). BikeE sold a decent number of bikes -- they just didn't make any money.

    To me, this looks like the same market (not the same bike). The BikeE was very comfortable, if not
    fast. It was also pretty much one-size-fits-all. A 5 second adjustment was all it took for my 4'11"
    daughter to ride it (I'm 6'3"). A lot of the people who think they'd like a cruiser or a comfort
    bike would probably be interested in trying this. Let's face it -- comfort riders (hybrids,
    sports-comfort bikes, cruisers) ARE the mainstream. The internal gearing means there's little for
    the user to maintain, you'd probably put a thick commuter tire on the back so there'd be few flats,
    and since there's one size the bike shops don't have to keep much inventory and the buyer doesn't
    have to worry that they bought the wrong size.

    I don't know whether it will sell or not, but it certainly looks like an interesting thing to try.
    Every so often, you need something new to get some excitement into the industry and get some people
    into the showrooms [reference to the auto industry intentional].

    --
    reply address: MikeKr at AOL dot COM
     
  16. I'm a comfort rider and have been considering one, but I should need to test ride it. It has the
    Shimano Nexus automatic gear-shifter that I want, plus the very low step-through. The stability of
    being able to have both feet on the ground at a standstill would have been a major argument in its
    favor a year ago when I was learning to ride. Now I can manage with a normal bike and the seat
    raised high, but I hate traffic lights that force me to stop and perch on tip-toe and restart in an
    inappropriate gear.

    I deplore the lack of an integrated anti-theft device. Crazy to leave something that conspicuous and
    obviously expensive on a parking lot with only a chain to protect it!! Also, the angle of the
    handlebar makes it look unsuitable for the fixing of a basket, indispensible for a shopping bike.
    There is no skirt guard, and since the seating is extra-low, even a shortish skirt could very well
    trail into the back wheel. And the wheels are small - doesn't that make it much less efficient than
    a bike which normal sized wheels?

    How do you think it would fare for an 11 km commute, with some tough uphill passages?

    Elisa Francesca Roselli Ile de France

    Badger South wrote:

    > Do you think anyone besides comfort riders will purchase one? I just have trouble seeing it as
    > becoming mainstream, although it does seem like it has the potential to step ahead of the classic
    > recumbent.
     
  17. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > It's more conventional looking but the geometry seems to be a lot like the Giant's. Electra makes
    > much of the riders' ability to reach the ground with their feet, and their theory seems to be that
    > this is a significant barrier to some people taking up cycling. I suppose that's true. You
    > certainly see a lot of awkward-looking people riding bikes with the saddles far too low for this
    > very reason.

    Ain't that the truth. I spent this past weekend at the LAB rally in Madison, Florida. I was riding
    sweep on a ride Saturday with a 66 year old lady who could not seem to figure out how to get off of
    her bike. She would not remove her rear from the saddle until the bike came to a stop.

    I finally got her to raise her seat a little and demonstrated how to stand on the pedals, move
    forward, and stop. She finally figured out that it was much easier to ride with the seat higher and
    getting some leg extension. Dismounting continued to be an adventure throughout the ride.

    I also had the opportunity to ride with several recumbent riders. They look like fun but they were
    scary to ride with. The folks on short wheelbase bikes seem to have a lot of trouble keeping them
    headed in a straight line.

    Dick Durbin
     
  18. Buck wrote:

    > "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >>>But it'll get you from point A to point B as fast as you would care. And serious depends on you,
    >>>I guess....
    >>
    >>To some people, the lower height-of-eye on a recumbent bothers them when riding in traffic. Others
    >>have no problem with it. Depends on what you like...
    >
    >
    > I rode one the other day. The semi-recumbent position keeps your head up, though not as high as an
    > upright, it's pretty close.
    >
    > These things are not geared high enough to be speed demons. I found myself wanting two or three
    > more to go faster.....
    >
    > It takes a bit of getting used to. The geometry makes it squirrelly if you put weight on the bars.
    > You have to ride like you are driving a car with power steering. A light touch will do.
    >
    > Neat bike for a Sunday cruise around the neighborhood with the family. But pretty much worthless
    > everywhere else.
    >
    > -Buck
    >
    >
    >
    So how much does it cost?
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, "Buck" <s c h w i n n _ f o r _ s a l e @ h o
    t m a i l . c o m> wrote:

    > "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > > > But it'll get you from point A to point B as fast as you would care. And serious depends on
    > > > you, I guess....
    > >
    > > To some people, the lower height-of-eye on a recumbent bothers them when riding in traffic.
    > > Others have no problem with it. Depends on what you like...
    >
    > I rode one the other day. The semi-recumbent position keeps your head up, though not as high as an
    > upright, it's pretty close.
    >
    > These things are not geared high enough to be speed demons. I found myself wanting two or three
    > more to go faster.....

    I hope Elisa is still reading this thread. There are two reasons this thing is so low-geared: the
    first is the intended audience; the second is because you can't stand on hills. That latter point
    may or may not be a deal-breaker.

    > It takes a bit of getting used to. The geometry makes it squirrelly if you put weight on the bars.
    > You have to ride like you are driving a car with power steering. A light touch will do.
    >
    > Neat bike for a Sunday cruise around the neighborhood with the family. But pretty much worthless
    > everywhere else.

    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/cn/030.000.000/030.050.000.asp?dealerid=&de
    alercountry=&lYear=2004&bikesection=8814&range=134&model=9972

    Oof.

    http://tinyurl.com/rwfs

    For some riders, that's enough. My wife (telling secrets out of school...) has obvious balance and
    confidence issues on our regular bike-path rides. She just hasn't ridden a bike very much, and finds
    starting and stopping awkward because she can't put her feet down very well. Something like this
    Giant Revive could make all the difference to her.

    BTW, the bike is available with a Nexus hub drive or a Sora derailleur with a twist-grip SRAM
    shifter. the Nexus ("DX") version also has composite wheels vs. spoked, drum brakes vs. V-brakes,
    and an aggressively rerouted chain (from the looks of it the lower chain run is pulled up beside
    the chainstay (or swingarm, to use the fitting motorcycle terminology) by an idler wheel near the
    front ring.

    The DX looks cleaner and more practical, but is probably a few pounds heavier.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
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