New hub concept



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D

Docvelo

Guest
I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.

With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing
the wheel...

I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.

I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm

Does the thing deserve some interest ? Any potential ? Thanx for your comments, that will be sent to
the designer.

J. Ouellet
 
L

lisated

Guest
"DocVelo" <[email protected]> wrote:

> I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
>
> With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> wheel...
>
> I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
>
> I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm
>
> Does the thing deserve some interest ? Any potential ? Thanx for your comments, that will be sent
> to the designer.
>
> J. Ouellet

Can't see much advantage to it.

With the conventional design, you have to release the brake, release the skewer and pull the
derailleur back, and the wheel falls out.

With your design, you have to release the brake, release the skewer, unscrew and remove the skewer,
and then the wheel comes out. That probably takes longer because of having to unscrew the skewer nut
all the way. Definitely slower when replacing the wheel.

--
Ted Bennett Portland OR
 
J

Jon Isaacs

Guest
>Can't see much advantage to it.
>
> With the conventional design, you have to release the brake, release the skewer and pull the
> derailleur back, and the wheel falls out.
>
>With your design, you have to release the brake, release the skewer, unscrew and remove the skewer,
>and then the wheel comes out. That probably takes longer because of having to unscrew the skewer
>nut all the way. Definitely slower when replacing the wheel.
>
>--
>Ted Bennett Portland OR

I agree and wonder as well about how the bending loads in the axle are handled. From what I can see,
it seems like the axle is actually two pieces so it must depend on the clamping of the QR keep
things together, not a good idea in my mind.

Seems like this design makes things more complicated with no real advantage.

Motor cycles sometimes use a step similar to this and it avoids having to deal with the chain and
the chain case. For a single speed bike or a hub gear bike, this might be nice but in the case of
the hub gear it would make things even more complex.

jon isaacs
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Tue, 25 Feb 2003 01:26:56 -0500, DocVelo wrote:

> I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
>
> With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> wheel...
>
> I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
>
> I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm
>
I don't see the problem that it addresses. A wheel can be removed ane replaced fairly quickly, if
you know what you are doing. Heck, Rae Dawn Chong managed to make a quick wheel change in American
Flyers with only a little training.

I would think that either the integrity of the axle would be suspect (how does it connect together,
anyway?) or the connection would be as time-consuming to deal with as a standard wheel.

Nothing wrong with touching the gear shifters. On the other hand, here you would have to remove the
QR completely. And manage to get the thing uncoupled, and then back again.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front _`\(,_ | of enough
typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the
collected works of Shakespeare. The internet has proven this not to be the case.
 
M

Marten Gerritse

Guest
> On Tue, 25 Feb 2003 01:26:56 -0500, DocVelo wrote:
>
> > I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
> >
> > With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> > shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> > wheel...
> >
> > I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
> >
> > I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm
> >
>

These things have been around for ages. Can't remember if I've seen them with cassettes, but I have
a freewheelversion at the office. Only practical use I see is with a travel bike: A flat wheel
without cogs packs a lot easier in a suitcase. /Marten
 
R

Rlbeldon

Guest
"DocVelo" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
> I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
>
> With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> wheel...

Cinelli did this decades ago. It was possible to exchange front and rear wheels with their system.

> I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
>
> I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm
>
> Does the thing deserve some interest ? Any potential ? Thanx for your comments, that will be sent
> to the designer.
>
> J. Ouellet
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
"DocVelo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
>
> With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> wheel...
>
> I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.

Been done, the Cinelli Bivalent Hub system.
--
Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
 
J

Jeff Wills

Guest
"A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "DocVelo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
> >
> > With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> > shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> > wheel...
> >
> > I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
>
>
> Been done, the Cinelli Bivalent Hub system.

Yep: http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Italy/Cinelli_parts.htm (scroll to the bottom)
http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Market_highs/Cinelli_Bi-Valent_hubs.htm

Jeff
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
DocVelo-<< I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear
> hub concept.

<< I put pictures on this page :
> http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm

very motorcycle-esque-answer to a not asked question tho...

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
A

Andy Coggan

Guest
Cinelli proposed this, what, 40 years ago? It never caught on...

Andy Coggan

"DocVelo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new rear hub concept.
>
> With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel , without touching gear
> shifters, because the freewheel body remains at it's place on the bike frame, while removing the
> wheel...
>
> I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
>
> I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm
>
> Does the thing deserve some interest ? Any potential ? Thanx for your comments, that will be sent
> to the designer.
>
> J. Ouellet
 
R

Rman

Guest
"Andy Coggan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Cinelli proposed this, what, 40 years ago? It never caught on...
>
[snip]

Am I interpreting this design correct ? Could I change wheels, without having to change cassettes ?
To me there would be some merit to that in that I would no longer have to be concerned about
variable cassette ware between the wheelsets I have. Currently I have a cassette on one wheelset
with about 8,000 km, another with about 5,000 and another new. I run the same chain on all of them,
which seems ok at this time, but have read it can lead to problems

RMan
 
J

Jay Beattie

Guest
"David L. Johnson >" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Tue, 25 Feb 2003 01:26:56 -0500, DocVelo wrote:
>
> > I just received pictures, from an european engineer, about a new
rear
> > hub concept.
> >
> > With this hub, it's possible to remove and/or replace the rear wheel
,
> > without touching gear shifters, because the freewheel body remains
at
> > it's place on the bike frame, while removing the wheel...
> >
> > I'd like to know your opinion about this new hub.
> >
> > I put pictures on this page : http://docvelo.membres.jexiste.org/nv_moyeu.htm
> >
> I don't see the problem that it addresses. A wheel can be removed ane replaced fairly quickly, if
> you know what you are doing. Heck, Rae
Dawn
> Chong managed to make a quick wheel change in American Flyers with
only a
> little training.

Hey, Rae Dawn was an exception woman! She was tough with a heart of gold, and she cared for Kevin
Costner when he was stricken with that fatal nose bleed thing. I was touched. That was perhaps the
best cycling film of all times, second only to PeeWee's Big Adventure.

Anyway, the Cinelli failed to catch on back in the old five-speed days when dish was not such an
issue. I really wonder how this iteration would fare with 130mm 9 or 10 speed spacing. The right
flange is even further toward the center of the hub due to the coupling mechanism. It seems to me
that you would have to go with 140mm spacing to make the dish reasonable -- assuming that you could
justify owning this oddity in the first place. -- Jay Beattie.
 
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