New mega-3 review study shows no anticancer benefit :-(

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Knack, Jan 25, 2006.

  1. Knack

    Knack Guest

    I'm not a JAMA subscriber. Does the conclusion covers all forms of omega-3,
    including alpha-linolenic PUFA? The Associated Press interview of Doyle
    (American Cancer Society) reported only her remark about fish oil.

    What about Dr. Budwig's protocol? She insisted that the conjugate of
    alpha-linolenic PUFA with casein produced great results.

    References :

    Catherine H. MacLean, MD, PhD; Sydne J. Newberry, PhD; Walter A. Mojica, MD,
    MPH; Puja Khanna, MD; Amalia M. Issa, MPH, PhD; Marika J. Suttorp, MS;
    Yee-Wee Lim, MD, PhD; Shana B. Traina, MA; Lara Hilton, BA; Rena Garland,
    BA; Sally C. Morton, PhD
    Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Cancer Risk; A Systematic Review
    JAMA. 2006;295:403-415

    http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/295/4/403

    Associated Press release
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060125/ap_on_he_me/diet_fish_cancer_8
     
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  2. montygram

    montygram Guest

    No results for omega 3 supplementation are valid unless the person or
    animal is already overloaded with omega 6s to begin with. Such studies
    do not control for the possibility that Mead acid, an omega 9 PUFA that
    human cells can make on their own, is optimal. Such studies either
    used a mixed fat control versus a fat free diet, or, as is more often
    the case recently, a high omega 6 diet versus a mixture of omega 3s and
    6s. Omega 3s are ineffectual: blood doesn't clot, proper skin barriers
    can't form, etc., so when you have a mixture in your body, some have
    concluded, there is a "balance" that is optimal. The problem is that
    there are very unstable molecules that do great harm when lipid
    peroxidation occurs, which it will unless your diet is very high in
    antioxidants. Nobody knoww what the correct amounts would be, so it is
    really a kind of Russian roulette. Note that even the omega 9 PUFA,
    Mead acid, can be dangerous if it were eaten in large amounts in the
    diet without enough antioxidants. The point is to let your body make
    it's own PUFA and don't eat more than trace amounts in the diet. Fats
    like coconut oil and butter have all kinds of beneficial effects, with
    no problematic qualities. The studies that show that "saturated fat"
    is bad usually use lard, which is indeed not healthy, but it is because
    it is about 60% unsaturated, and with no antioxidants, and thus causes
    free radical damage and molecular dysfunction (inhibiting enzymes,
    turning on the genetic machinery - NF-bK, etc.).
     
  3. Knack

    Knack Guest

    When alpha-linolenic acid is conjugated with casein, it should be more
    stable, less easily oxidized... correct?

    Typically when the subject of antioxidants in foods comes up, one may hear
    mention of blueberry, raspberry, red grape skins, billberry, brocolli,
    strawberry, undutched cocoa, etc.. But coconut has no such well known
    reputation. I've searched and haven't found any ORAC ratings for coconut
    oil. If coconut oil has such good antioxidant properties, then why hasn't
    that been researched and why isn't that commonly known? After all, millions
    of people consume it.
     
  4. MMu

    MMu Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]

    > No results for omega 3 supplementation are valid unless the person or
    > animal is already overloaded with omega 6s to begin with. Such studies
    > do not control for the possibility that Mead acid, an omega 9 PUFA that
    > human cells can make on their own, is optimal.


    Because it has been shown, repeatedly, that at the time mead acid is built
    in the body (which only happens in case of w3/w6 deficiency) a lot of very
    bad things start to happen.

    > Note that even the omega 9 PUFA,
    > Mead acid, can be dangerous if it were eaten in large amounts in the
    > diet without enough antioxidants.


    Tell me a single food that contains large ammounts of mead acid please.

    And if there is none: why is that so?
    If mead acid is so much better than w3 / w6 fatty acids there should have
    been a selection against animals that consume w3 / w6 fatty acids towards
    animals that build only their own mead acid during evolution.
    This does not seem to be the case.

    >The point is to let your body make
    > it's own PUFA and don't eat more than trace amounts in the diet. Fats
    > like coconut oil and butter have all kinds of beneficial effects, with
    > no problematic qualities. The studies that show that "saturated fat"
    > is bad usually use lard, which is indeed not healthy, but it is because
    > it is about 60% unsaturated, and with no antioxidants, and thus causes
    > free radical damage and molecular dysfunction (inhibiting enzymes,
    > turning on the genetic machinery - NF-bK, etc.).


    (its NF-kB; and the "genetic machinery" is hopefully *always* turned on..
    otherwise we would be dead very soon- protein synthesis, cell cycle,
    metabolism.. they all depend on the "genetic machinery")

    The bad properties of saturated fats have, in contrast to your theory, not
    ever been asociated with any kind of free radical damage- but if you have
    literature that indicates otherwise please be kind enough to post a
    citation.
     
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