New mudguards

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Budstaff, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Budstaff

    Budstaff Guest

    Just finished fitting a pair of new mudguards to SWMBO's bike

    They're a lovely pair of SKS Hybrids purchased online from the CTC Shop
    (which apparently these days is a branch of Evans with a discount)

    The mudguards themselves have provoked a question, and fitting them a
    whinge:

    Question:
    The advertised reflector is very substantial and apparently has a bulb in
    it! Is there any way the light can be used? I'm loathe to try and take the
    thing apart in the absence of instructions as it looks a bit brittle.

    Whinge:
    The mudguards come without the fittings to connect them to the bike, which
    should if you're replacing old ones not be a problem (although b___y
    annoying if it's a new fit). However, the much-vaunted safety connector
    thingies at the front require a much longer allen bolt to attach them to the
    fork than standard wire only stays do, so the bolts I had were not long
    enough. Fortunately, the bike has (unused) bosses on the forks for front
    racks, which had been filled with longer bolts, so a bit of swapping got me
    fixed. But IMHO the missing fixings could be the ha'porth of tar that
    changes a simple task into a real day-spoiler. Am I being unreasonable?

    Regards
    Budstaff
     
    Tags:


  2. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Budstaff wrote:
    > Just finished fitting a pair of new mudguards to SWMBO's bike
    >
    > They're a lovely pair of SKS Hybrids purchased online from the CTC Shop
    > (which apparently these days is a branch of Evans with a discount)
    >
    > The mudguards themselves have provoked a question, and fitting them a
    > whinge:
    >
    > Question:
    > The advertised reflector is very substantial and apparently has a bulb in
    > it! Is there any way the light can be used? I'm loathe to try and take the
    > thing apart in the absence of instructions as it looks a bit brittle.
    >


    Its a 6v 0.6w ulb intended for use with a dynamo. I bet the guard has a
    metallic strip built in and a small spigot at the 'front end'. One
    connection is made to the spigot, the other via the bike frame and
    stays. You could just connect a 6v supply to the bulb. The light and
    reflector is almost certainly BS6102 and BS6103, mine is, it will be
    marked as such, the marking is part of the standard. That means its
    road legal in the UK.
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Budstaff wrote:

    > The advertised reflector is very substantial and apparently has a
    > bulb in it! Is there any way the light can be used? I'm loathe to try
    > and take the thing apart in the absence of instructions as it looks a
    > bit brittle.


    It must be possible to get at the bulb to change it, so you could look for
    what voltage is marked on it. If hooking up a battery to it, I would risk
    over-volting to get high brightnesss and efficiency: 7.2V battery with 6V
    bulb, for example. However, you will get more efficiency by ignoring it
    and using an LED light instead.

    ~PB
     
  4. Budstaff

    Budstaff Guest

    "MSeries" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Budstaff wrote:
    >> Just finished fitting a pair of new mudguards to SWMBO's bike
    >>
    >> They're a lovely pair of SKS Hybrids purchased online from the CTC Shop
    >> (which apparently these days is a branch of Evans with a discount)
    >>
    >> The mudguards themselves have provoked a question, and fitting them a
    >> whinge:
    >>
    >> Question:
    >> The advertised reflector is very substantial and apparently has a bulb in
    >> it! Is there any way the light can be used? I'm loathe to try and take
    >> the
    >> thing apart in the absence of instructions as it looks a bit brittle.
    >>

    >
    > Its a 6v 0.6w ulb intended for use with a dynamo. I bet the guard has a
    > metallic strip built in and a small spigot at the 'front end'. One
    > connection is made to the spigot, the other via the bike frame and
    > stays. You could just connect a 6v supply to the bulb. The light and
    > reflector is almost certainly BS6102 and BS6103, mine is, it will be
    > marked as such, the marking is part of the standard. That means its
    > road legal in the UK.
    >

    Yes, I've seen the guards with the strip built in but this isn't one of
    them. I'm beginning to suspect this may be one of those occasions when they
    find it cheaper to put the same thing on all the guards than have two sorts
    of 'reflector'.
     
  5. M-gineering

    M-gineering Guest

    Budstaff wrote:

    >
    > Yes, I've seen the guards with the strip built in but this isn't one of
    > them.


    Good. Strips are the work of Stan etc! Use a double wire instead.
    --
    ---
    Marten Gerritsen

    INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
    www.m-gineering.nl
     
  6. Pete Biggs wrote:

    > Budstaff wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The advertised reflector is very substantial and apparently has a
    >>bulb in it! Is there any way the light can be used? I'm loathe to try
    >>and take the thing apart in the absence of instructions as it looks a
    >>bit brittle.

    >
    >
    > It must be possible to get at the bulb to change it, so you could look for
    > what voltage is marked on it. If hooking up a battery to it, I would risk
    > over-volting to get high brightnesss and efficiency: 7.2V battery with 6V
    > bulb, for example. However, you will get more efficiency by ignoring it
    > and using an LED light instead.


    And then replace the lamp with a suitable reflector. B&M make a very
    good one for bolting onto a rear mudguard, if you can find it for sale.
     
  7. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Budstaff wrote:

    >>

    > Yes, I've seen the guards with the strip built in but this isn't one of
    > them. I'm beginning to suspect this may be one of those occasions when they
    > find it cheaper to put the same thing on all the guards than have two sorts
    > of 'reflector'.
    >
    >

    The red plastic part on mine just unclips by easing the black plastic
    part away from each end. Personally I'd run two new wires anyway.
     
  8. TheMgt

    TheMgt Guest

    Budstaff wrote:

    > The mudguards come without the fittings to connect them to the bike, which
    > should if you're replacing old ones not be a problem (although b___y
    > annoying if it's a new fit).


    Isn't it though. Luckily for me I'm one of those folk who keep all their old
    nuts, bolts and screws in a big jar.

    > However, the much-vaunted safety connector thingies at the front require
    > a much longer allen bolt to attach them to the fork than standard wire
    > only stays do, so the bolts I had were not long enough.


    What purpose do these serve anyway? The stays kept popping out of mine so I
    pulled them off and screwed the stays on directly.
     
  9. TheMgt wrote:

    > What purpose do these serve anyway? The stays kept popping out of mine so I
    > pulled them off and screwed the stays on directly.
    >

    In theory, should you get a stick caught in the front mudguard, these
    fittings release rather than the front wheel locking. I don't know if
    they work, because a stick would normally jam under the fork crown, that
    being the least bendy point.

    I've only seen this happen once and the mudguard shattered (exploded,
    even) with no harm to the rider. Metal guards are much more dangerous
    because they bend rather than break.
     
Loading...
Loading...