New muscles stressed for TT position?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by rayhuang, Feb 2, 2007.

  1. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

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    In a nutshell, how many hours of training would one prescribe for a road cyclist to train on a steep seat angle Time Trial (Tri) bike before an event? Also, what muscles in particular are used when in a full aerodynamic tuck on the aero bars as opposed to the varying positions used in road racing?

    Is there a particular cross training that a pure Time Trialists uses when preparing for a time trial? For sure I can think of two-extra stretching and core strength

    I ask for two reasons. One, I am about ready to purchase a full out TT bike (as opposed to adding clip on bars and thumb shifters on my road bike) and two although i plan a full season of road races, two big races for 2007 are Time Trials.
     
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  2. GIH

    GIH New Member

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    I always thought the main benefits of stretching and core strength was so that the rider could have a more aerodynamic position on the bike. As for the best way to get more flexible, I'm not sure. I have definitely read that static stretching can lead to injuries if not done right. I did check out a book from the library called Sport Stretch by Alter. It had a number of static stretches it suggested for triathletes and cyclists, and it had good advice about how to do them correctly and it tried to explain the effects of stretching scientifically (or within a scientific framework describing muscles and connective tissue).

    I actually know a lot of core strength workouts because I used to play tennis (a sport where core strength is extremely important), but I don't know how they would apply to cycling. If I had to guess at one thing that would be useful I would say back extensions, but its possible that these type of workouts could be counterproductive somehow as well.
     
  3. AndROOb

    AndROOb New Member

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    Out of the 9 or so hours I spend per week training for time trials, I spend at least 1 hour a week on my TT bike. I did leave a gap of about 6 weeks dec/jan, and the first ride left my gluts aching for a few hours afterwards, but the following week I was fine.
     
  4. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

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    That I can do-do one of my rides every week on the Time Trial bike. Problem around here is there are no flat roads and a lot of short steep rollers (some rollers are just long enough and steep enough to need a 39/23 even though you hit the bottom in the big chain ring).

    I used to TT on my road bike, no changes except the clip on bars. I figure todays TT bikes with 76 to 79º seat tube angles would require more specific training to adapt your body!!!
     
  5. AndROOb

    AndROOb New Member

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    Is it possible to drive somewhere, possibly a TT course?
    I'm in a similar situation to you with surrounding hills, so I drive 15 miles or so to a course that I use regularly throughout spring/summer. Doing this allows me to get very familiar with the course topology/gearing etc. The drive out there also helps me to get focussed for a good session, which then allows me to get the most from it.
     
  6. azdroptop

    azdroptop New Member

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    I've used the TT angle with my cervelo 3 times for races and quite a bit in training. Not a 'true' TT bike, but it get's you close. The muscles I noticed the most were my hip flexors and gluts. I think the best thing you can do to get ready for it bar any 'specific' exercises would be just to get out a few times a week in your TT position. You get comfortable pretty quick.
     
  7. mark higgins

    mark higgins New Member

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    I tend to train at least once a week on my tt bike from about January. Mainly on the turbo as the weather is c**p. This allows my body to remember the position and to keep playing around with slight changes. Otherwise just the usual stretching, but nothing extreme.
     
  8. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

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    I am cooling my jets on buying a bike, but I think on some good advice that I will use a spare saddle and seat post I have and get a proffesional TT fit on my road bike. Next of course buy a set of clip-ons (specific to a road bike with seat shoved forward) like the Profile Jammer SL's. for the early season TT's I'll give up thumb shifting on the aero bars, but i didnt have them 19 years ago or so and did alright!!


    This way I am a few minutes of work away from testing a TT position. IN other words, take out my current seat post and saddle and install the other combo and clipons. At most I might need to buy a seat post with different offset or a saddle with a longer, wider nose and be about $2500 ahead!! I am thinking the money saved now could buy a sweet 60mm deep Zipp or Flashpoint front wheel and maybe even lighten up my bike another 1/2 to 1 lb!!

    As a side benefit-when i find a position thats both comfy, powerful ( i have a PT) and aero on my current road bike, I can better shop for the correct TT frame and accesories.

    Ray
     
  9. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

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    I guess my only concern would just be not being able to get the clip-on bars or arm rests low enough to be full optimized aerodynamically, but it would also not rush me into an uncomfy, but more aero position thats actually slower than a more comfy one!!
     
  10. Catabolic_Jones

    Catabolic_Jones New Member

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    I've got my TT rig set up on the trainer right now. I'll probably ride it two or even three times a week here on out. But that's because I intend to focus on the TT. I think once a week in that position is good enough. The thing I really try to direct my energy into is simply building my engine. That's really what makes a great time trialist, is that L4 ability. Anyone can get into a nice tuck on the bike with the right setup.

    So I think you are correct for the moment in just getting the basics and thinking more about building fitness. Good luck with it!
     
  11. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

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    I got a Profesional TT fit today (same guy who did my regular fit) on my Six13. Not as low on the bars as I'd like, but my fit guy is adamant that on my roadbike-not to try to go any lower due to important other elements like hip angle and thighs hitting my body. we used the profile design Jammer GT's. NIce clip-ons and I can still ride on the tops comfortably with non-flip-up pads. He knows what hes doing so i am going to do what he says. :)

    I decided to get it asap so I can take a lot of time making tiny adjustments should I want or need them or big changes (like a padded nose TT saddle).

    Ray
     
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