New Quarq on the trainer today

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by HillyGoat, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. HillyGoat

    HillyGoat New Member

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    Got a new Quarq but we are having heavy rains here in Nor Cal this weekend so I put my bike on the trainer, something I rarely do. I am now wondering if my trainer is bad.....In the biggest gear I have to spin at 110 rpm to get 200-210 watts and 130+ rpm to stay in the 270 watt (threshold) range. II really can't sustain 130 RPM for very long so it preclludes doing threshold or even subthreshold work on the trainier. Is the trainer worn out, thus providing too little resistance? I bought it second hand and have never owned a trainer before so I have nothing to compare it to.
     
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  2. Conan

    Conan New Member

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    What sort of trainer is it - Magnetic - Fluid? If it's a decent mag trainer you should have plenty of resistance. If it has a cable adjustment, maybe check the cable to make sure it's not seized. Also have a look at the mag unit itself - it may be seized. The trainers I have looked at have a plate Like a small disc brake and another plate or ring containing the magnets. As these move closer to the disc, they create more resistance. They are usually pretty simple to disassemble and service.

    If it's a fluid trainer - I can't help as I've never had one.

    Good luck!
    Chris
     
  3. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    i haven't got power input, but i own 2 fluid trainers of the same brand, the newer model has twice the resistance of the older model, however i can still get decent resistance to do a good workout on the older model,
     
  4. HillyGoat

    HillyGoat New Member

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    I think it is time to buy a new one....I am certain it is worn out
     
  5. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Is there no way to set the tire press-on force? Most trainers provide some mechanism for applying more or less force to the tire. Trainer resistance is also highly sensitive to the tire and even tire wear.
     
  6. HillyGoat

    HillyGoat New Member

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    No.....it's an older one with no adjustments. I found oil on the floor that leaked from the unit the last time I used it...time for the trash can.
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    If you're going to be looking at new trainers, I'd seriously consider one of the following. They consistently get the highest ratings of users and mag journos: 1UPUSA Bike Trainer: [​IMG] Kurt Kinetic: [​IMG]
     
  8. joroshiba

    joroshiba New Member

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    I've used both of those trainers and as far as trainers go they are pretty awesome. That said: I hate trainers. I personally prefer to run rollers: feels more realistic, work on handling a bit, don't put stress frames aren't designed for into the rear triangle. Cycleops Aluminum with the resistance unit is what I use. Gives more than enough resistance for me, and I haven't heard anyone say otherwise.
     
  9. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Fortunately indoor trainers really don't stress frames.
     
  10. joroshiba

    joroshiba New Member

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    Perhaps not to the breaking point on modern frames but fixing the rear wheel in place while you hammer away certainly puts stress on the bike. I have personally seen a number of older carbon frame with cracked chainstays because of this phenomena. It is far from common, but I have seen it occur. Bikes are designed such that the rear wheel and bottom bracket move together when stressed, if you look at the say they stress test bikes this is apparent. Front end fixed, rear end able to move and then cycle like a pedal stroke. Fixing the rear wheel goes entirely against this.

    I'm assuming you mean clamping stress, which is true unless you have the wrong skewer or you should be clamping the skewer not the frame, but the rear wheel is still fixed while the bottom bracket moves under normal pedaling forces.
     
  11. joroshiba

    joroshiba New Member

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    Technically they stress skewers, but seeing as that skewer holds the frame in place and your bottom bracket moves from side to side while the rear end is fixed, there are definate stresses involved. Have you ever looked at the frame testing they do? They load the BB and fix the front end, not the rear. The rear is designed to move with the BB when there is lateral deflection, and this is how they are fatigue tested, they are not designed and fatigue tested around sitting in a trainer. This is why I run rollers, the bike can operate as it is designed to.
     
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