new rider needs help

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by lochick87, Apr 24, 2005.

  1. lochick87

    lochick87 New Member

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    I am 17 and looking to getting into cycling. I have an indoor bike that I use but it is more of an exercise bike and not the same as a bike that someone would ride outdoors. But anyways, I would ride on roads that are a paved but a little rocky sometimes. As I am a teen, budget is VERY limited. I like these two bikes but would like the opinion of others that are more experienced.

    Schwinn 2005 Fastback Sport 24
    http://www.schwinnbike.com/products/bikes_detail.php?id=408

    or

    Schwinn 2005 Super Sport
    http://www.schwinnbike.com/products/bikes_detail.php?id=403

    Please feel free to make suggestions. My budget is $600 and under. Also, what other things do you suggest I purchase as well (repair kit, clothing,etc.)....?

    Also, it seems that there are some good deals on ebay but I don't know about sizing? Should I get fitted for a bike first?
     
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  2. rcrampton

    rcrampton New Member

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    I'm not much of a fan of the "hybrid comfort bikes." The somewhat upright body position and frame geometry seems to give up a lot on hill climbing. I do find them comfortable for very short rides but not longer rides, say > 10 miles. The upright riding causes you to absorb all of the road bumps and so forth directly in your back. So I would avoid the "Super Sport" but the road bike looks nice.

    If you are going to end up on gravel roads you might even look at a mountain bike since you'd have a good selection of tires from very knobby to fairly low friction but still with good grip. I can take my mountain bike anywhere but my road bike doesn't do well off pavement unless it's a nice hard packed dirt surface.

    I think the most important thing is to find a comfortable frame. If you decide you don't like some components you can swap them out later. The frame is the core piece that remains fixed.

    As far as accessories make sure you budget the right amount for them. They can run > $100 very easily. You'll probably want padded shorts (~$45-$60), the better ones last a lot longer than the cheap ones. Flat tire kit, bike tool, chain lube, water bottle cages/bottles, spedometer, fame mount bike pump. You might want green slime tubes to avoid more flats. Some people want a bike jersey and clipless pedals/shoes (pricey!).

    The great news is that once you buy the bike you can put 1000 miles on it without spending hardly a dime.
     
  3. lohsnest

    lohsnest New Member

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    I like the Fastback myself. If you're looking for a slightly better bike at maybe a little more than $600, you may want to consider Jamis bikes. They have MTB and Road bikes. The first thing to consider when buying your bike is the fit. You wouldn't want to get into a bike that's way too small/big for you. The best thing to do is to go to some of your local bike shops and see what they think. They are often the best judge of what your fit should be, but again, their advice is no real substitute for your comfort....get what you're comfortable on.

    As far as clothing, you may or may not need the right clothes right away. It all depends on how much riding you will be doing. Bike clothing has much to do with your comfort while riding, mainly padding and moisture control. If you will just be biking around town, you may not need padded bike shorts and jersey. A simple repair kit for changing a flat and repairing a tube is a good idea.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,
     
  4. lochick87

    lochick87 New Member

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    Thanks for all the help. I would probably be biking around 25 or more miles at a time. Also, if I buy a trainer for indoor riding, will a computer for the bike work indoors? just wondering... also right now I am 5'8 and around 170lbs, what size bike should I consider(also, I am in offseason from different sports so my weight will be between 150-170).
     
  5. lohsnest

    lohsnest New Member

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    Well, a cyclocomputer will work if you have it configured corectly. You will need to mount the wheel magnet on the rear wheel and have the actual computer mounted on the handlebars somewhere. I believe there was a previous thread a few months ago where a similar question was asked....you may need to splice an additional wire to the unit to make it long enough to reach. It may be more difficult, if not impossible, to configure if you are using a wireless setup.

    What kinda sports are we talking?
     
  6. lochick87

    lochick87 New Member

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    thanks for the help. oh and i do track and field, weight lifting, and whatever rec. activities
     
  7. KikyoMerc

    KikyoMerc New Member

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    My reccomendation for a bike would have to be Jamis Satelite. http://jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_satellite.html It is a pretty good deal, not that heavy and good geometry. Overall it is a great bike and under your 600 dollar mark. I believe it would be a great bike for you, but thats just my humble opinion.
     
  8. lohsnest

    lohsnest New Member

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    Think about a tt or triathalon bike...might be right up your alley.... Motobecane makes some nice rides that are affordable.... All you would have to do is to know how to swim and you're set. :D
     
  9. tjocesq

    tjocesq New Member

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    I've heard good things about Jamis. Also, if you can check around and find a cheap cyclo-cross bike--it can handle both asphalt and dirt roads.
     
  10. fix

    fix New Member

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    Regarding the computer: You may want to look for a cycle computer with a cadence function. Cadence monitors work well for trainers and can also be applied to your on-road training. No modification should be needed.

    Regarding accessories: DON'T FORGET TO BUDGET FOR A HELMET!

    Enjoy. :)
     
  11. lochick87

    lochick87 New Member

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    of course, a helmet is most important. Also, what is a cadence?
     
  12. KikyoMerc

    KikyoMerc New Member

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    Cadence is the speed at which you spin your pedals. At least thats what I have been led to believe it was.
     
  13. fix

    fix New Member

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    Glad to know that you will have a helmet

    Cadence is the number of pedalling cycles that you will do over a period of time. It is typically measured as Cycles per Minute. Instead of monitoring your wheel speed, you monitor your pedalling. There are a number of training techniques that focus on cadence, not speed. Speed will increase as you improve your strength and endurance through proper training. You will find many threads in this forum, training manuals and training videos that discuss cadence.

    Best wishes.
     
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