New to the forum, and picked this up

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by higsmck92, Nov 15, 2010.

  1. higsmck92

    higsmck92 New Member

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    I just moved to austin, texas and decided to get a roadbike, but i didnt have the money to buy a new bike and I would rather start with an oldschool project bike so I searched around and found this beauty...

    [​IMG]

    1964 JC Higgins Race Bike. I know I brake cables and the rims are bent pretty badly. If you go through my flickr youll see other pictures of her. I am a highschool student so i dont have much money to spend on her right now but could you guys show me a website or let me know where i can buy some relatively cheap wheels that will get the job done and will last long enough. The wheels are brand new. I spent about an hour the other day working on the gears and they are all running smoothly. The wheels on it right now are
    27 x 1 1/4. help me out please!
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Do you need tires or wheels? The wheel is the assembly that includes the hub, spokes, and rim. The tire is the rubber part that makes contact with the ground. There's a tube in there, too, of course.

    27" replacement wheels are rare now, 27" tires less so. This is because no new bikes are being made with 27" wheels. Many shops stock 27" tires (and tubes that will fit them), but 27" wheels will be a special order item. Niagaracycles.com is one internet dealer that might have 27" wheels.

    Regardless of whether you need tires, wheels, or tubes, your local shop should be able to help.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Wow .. that was a NICE FIND!

    Although the bike shows signs of having been forgotten-and-neglected, believe it or not, that was actually a pretty nice bike at one time ...

    The partially-chromed fork & rear stays were usually only found on higher end bikes ... that's not to say that someone couldn't spend more for a bike at the time, but your JC HIGGINS would have been one of the more expensive production bikes that you could probably buy in 1964.

    I'm going to guess that the bike was made by PUCH ... that's the only Austrian bike brand that I can think of (well, I think that Puch is Austrian) ... think of it as the Austrian equivalent of a RALEIGH or PEUGEOT from the same time period (you can think of TREK the principle contemporary mass producer) ...

    • While a "custom" frame (e.g, BOB JACKSON) or a super high end frame like a COLNAGO might have cost more than the ready-to-ride Puch, Raleigh, or Peugeot (just to name three large producers), the particular frame was at the high end of large production frames.

    Presuming the bike came installed with the CAMPAGNOLO GRAN SPORT derailleurs, it would be easy to suggest that the bike probably cost about 2x (?) what the base model bike in the "Puch" model line would cost.

    Having said all of that, I don't know if the bike would have any exceptional value (in case you were wondering) unless you found someone who was having a "Rosebud Moment" and just had to have one ...

    But, the bottom line is that once you put cables on it & a new front derailleur, it should be a great riding bike ...

    AND, because it probably has an English threaded BB shell, IMO, it would be easy-to-AND-worth-the-effort-to update the frame with contemporary components at some point in time AND for years/decades to come.

    The Campagnolo rear derailleur + broken front derailleur + hubs (of unknown origin, but they might be Campagnolo Gran Sport, too) actually have some value (yes, even a broken Campagnolo component could have some value), but I can't say how much ... it may only be $20, it could be more (!), so don't throw that stuff out if you ever decide to change the components (heck, I probably wouldn't mind finding a frame to put some of that stuff on as part of a "project bike" ... so, that means there are probably other people out there who would feel the same way!).

    BTW. If by "bent" you mean that the RIMS are not "true" (left-to-right) rather than being dented, then THAT problem can be readily remedied either by a bike shop OR you can DIY after you read up on how-to (this is easier-said-than-done) -- you will need an appropriately sized SPOKE WRENCH, probably some "oil" + some patience.

    The downtube shifter can/(should) be moved higher on the downtube -- there is usually a "cleat" that is brazed onto the top tube about 6" (?) from the head tube which the shifters' clamp snugs up against to prevent it from sliding down as low as it currently is .

    As far as web sites ... eBay is generally your "best bet" for finding compenents ... patience is the key.

    Look at http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html as a starting point for a lot of general & how-to information.
     
  4. Steve_A

    Steve_A Member

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    As usual, a very informative post, alfeng. I agree that this is a great find, and a great project bike to upgrade through the years as the OP finds the means and motivation. Welcome, higsmck92, and please keep us informed of your progress and impressions of this bike. If you find yourself needing vintage-style or vintage-sized parts, I can recommend Velo Orange and Rivendell (websites) as resources, as well as entertaining reading. Steve
     
  5. tomsmith2010

    tomsmith2010 New Member

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    Hi, friends, im newbie here, i don't know more about thos forum.. but i really like my cycling. pls share your nice comments and ideas here..
     
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