New to the sport, and need help?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Cali2010, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. Cali2010

    Cali2010 New Member

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    Hello everyone, I am new to this form so if this is posted in the wrong place I apologize in advance, I have decided to get in to road biking however I don’t know much about it (well nothing about it really...) I have read many posts that are against buying a cheap road bike but unfortunately at this time it is the only option. I have also read to just buy a used bike for the same amount of money however like I mentioned I know nothing about road biking. I can fix things as I am a car mechanic but when it comes to bikes I wouldn’t know the parts to buy. I live in Sacramento, CA I would like to stick around $300, don’t know if my specs effect the bike but if so I’m a 23 yr, Male, 5'9", 180 lbs, and so far the only things I have found have been the following (is one better then the other), but as I have read to stay away from big box store bikes, any helpful feed back to help out would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Buy Vilano TUONO 21SPD Shimano Road Bike at Wholesale Prices

    Walmart.com: 700c Men's Schwinn Varsity Road Bike: Bikes, Scooters & Skates
     
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  2. Billcycle

    Billcycle New Member

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    Welcome to the forum and cycling! A lot of us are just starting or restarting out, so you're in good company.

    One of the most consistent pieces of advice you're going to find as you get into the sport is that how the bike fits you is really the most important thing--an ill-fitting bike can be painful to ride for any significant amount of time, and if it's painful, you're not going to want to stick with it.

    There are numerous guides and sizing charts avail on line to give you an idea or range of what size bike is right for you (just search bike fitting, or hit any of the major manufacturer's sites and look for their fitting charts. But remember they're just guides, and there can be a lot of fine tweaking to get your bike to fit you perfectly.

    Obviously, if you have a local shop, the guy can help fit you--even on an inexpensive bike. There are some very nice entry level bikes avail from all the major makers in the $400-$500 range new, which means you might be able to find a used one or even a leftover new 2009 model for a bit closer to your $300 window.

    But don't feel bad if you're most comfortable with buying from a big box store--we've all made decisions like this, doing what you can do vs. what you might like to do if you had a few more bucks--I know I have!

    The most legitimate criticism I've read about box store bikes is that they have probably been assembled by someone with no specific training for the task--they've got the instructions and a few wrenches, and they just torque away, meaning the bike is probably not set up anywhere close to the way it's supposed to be.

    So if I did buy from a box store, after making sure the bike I was interested in was within the size range I needed, I'd probably set aside $50 or so take the bike to a small shop, or better yet find a knowledgeable friend and buy him/her a beer to go over the bike and make sure things are set up/tightened, aligned, etc., the way they're supposed to be.

    This same advice for a check out would apply to buying used, but as you say there are lots of ins and outs that would probably keep me from buying used while still brand new to the sport.

    Speaking of used, a lot of local shops carry used bikes--the shop I use does, and there are some decent deals there--road, mountain, hybrids, etc.. And he goes over all the used bikes, tweaks them, etc..

    But if it was a matter of buying from the box store or not buying, I'd by from the box store in a heartbeat. With a size that's right, and maybe a set up, it will get you riding, and that's the most important thing!

    Bill
     
  3. OldGoat

    OldGoat New Member

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    Suggest you go to your local LBS and get a handle on what size frame would most likely accommodate your body. There are also some online bike fitting sites (one mentioned in one of today'sresponses to a posts by a clydesdale) which might help you figure the size thing out. Then take a look at what's available on Craigslist or eBay; there are a lot of good but inexpensive bikes out there. You might, for example, find a several-years-old Trek 1000 in good condition for $300 or so. That bike was featured in Bicycling mag a couple of years ago as a super buy. My son got one for about $650 new back then. You'll save on shipping if you can find one locally.
     
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