New trail (trials) obstacle

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bomba, Mar 18, 2003.

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  1. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log
    is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means it's
    too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.

    It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below the
    rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position of
    trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not easy and
    I'm still not sure of the best course of action.

    Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    clear it :)
     
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  2. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    > idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log
    > is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means it's
    > too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    >
    > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below
    > the rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position
    > of trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not easy
    > and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    >
    > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > clear it :)

    Keep trying, it will be accomplished. Remember, its all about how you transfer your weight. As
    they say in trials...throw your body and the bike will follow (I tend to disbelieve that most of
    the time :))

    - CA-G

    Canadian Girls Kick Ass!

    - CA-G
     
  3. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Carla A-G wrote:

    > Keep trying, it will be accomplished. Remember, its all about how you transfer your weight. As
    > they say in trials...throw your body and the bike will follow (I tend to disbelieve that most of
    > the time :))

    Throwing the bike trials-stylee is all well and good, but I've got the saddle set up for XC (and I
    don't want to lower it, as it's in the middle of a ride. And it makes it more challenging). I'll
    work out a way round it. Er, I mean over it :)
     
  4. Carla says:

    >As they say in trials...throw your body and the bike will follow (I tend to disbelieve that most of
    >the time :))

    THat's your problem (and mine, truth be told) You have to have the faith - anything less than full
    belief and you finish up looking like a prat (in my case) ;-(

    Steve
     
  5. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Carla A-G" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    > > idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the
    > > log is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means
    > > it's too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    > >
    > > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below
    > > the rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position
    > > of trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not
    > > easy and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    > >
    > > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > > clear it :)
    >
    > Keep trying, it will be accomplished. Remember, its all about how you transfer your weight. As
    > they say in trials...throw your body and the bike will follow (I tend to disbelieve that most of
    > the time :))
    >
    > - CA-G
    >
    > Canadian Girls Kick Ass!
    >
    > - CA-G

    I thought is was, "Throw you body and the ambulance/Medivac helicopter will follow." At least that's
    how it works for me!

    --
    Slacker
     
  6. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Tue, 18 Mar 2003 21:24:33 +0100, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    >idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log
    >is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means it's
    >too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    >
    >It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below the
    >rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position of
    >trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not easy and
    >I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    >
    >Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    >clear it :)

    That sounds very fun, good riding.

    Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should
    give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  7. "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    > idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log
    > is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means it's
    > too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    >
    > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below
    > the rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position
    > of trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not easy
    > and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    >
    > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > clear it :)
    >

    C'mon bomba - use your bmx skills. How about a 360 nosepick, or 180 nosepick to fakie to revert
    out... or put some pegs on, maybe just a rear peg (you don't want to look stupid) and try an icepick
    to over etc. Show that sucker who's the boss.

    Being a little bit more realistic - try approaching with a bit more speed, lift the front wheel and
    just clip the top of the log, this should give you enough upward momentum to be able to get the rear
    wheel at least on top if not over, then just ride out (throw a barspin on the way out obviously).

    Steve E.
     
  8. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    spademan o---[) * wrote:

    > C'mon bomba - use your bmx skills. How about a 360 nosepick, or 180 nosepick to fakie to revert
    > out... or put some pegs on, maybe just a rear peg (you don't want to look stupid) and try an
    > icepick to over etc. Show that sucker who's the boss.
    >
    > Being a little bit more realistic - try approaching with a bit more speed, lift the front wheel
    > and just clip the top of the log, this should give you enough upward momentum to be able to get
    > the rear wheel at least on top if not over, then just ride out (throw a barspin on the way out
    > obviously).

    Surprisingly, I've considered most of those. On a normal log on the trail, nosepicking it,
    tyre-tapping it or nose-bonking it would be possibilities. Doing it on a log at the bottom of a
    gulley is just going to lead to me piling in to the slope on the other side.

    Strangely, the 180 (more like 120, actually) nosepick is one that I'm giving favour to. I figure I
    might be able to flick the rear over to the other side of the log, and then haul the front round so
    it's pointing up the slope, and then hop out.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  9. "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > spademan o---[) * wrote:
    >
    > > C'mon bomba - use your bmx skills. How about a 360 nosepick, or 180
    nosepick
    > > to fakie to revert out... or put some pegs on, maybe just a rear peg
    (you
    > > don't want to look stupid) and try an icepick to over etc. Show that
    sucker
    > > who's the boss.
    > >
    > > Being a little bit more realistic - try approaching with a bit more
    speed,
    > > lift the front wheel and just clip the top of the log, this should give
    you
    > > enough upward momentum to be able to get the rear wheel at least on top
    if
    > > not over, then just ride out (throw a barspin on the way out obviously).
    >
    > Surprisingly, I've considered most of those. On a normal log on the trail, nosepicking it,
    > tyre-tapping it or nose-bonking it would be possibilities. Doing it on a log at the bottom of a
    > gulley is just going to lead to me piling in to the slope on the other side.
    >
    > Strangely, the 180 (more like 120, actually) nosepick is one that I'm giving favour to. I figure I
    > might be able to flick the rear over to the other side of the log, and then haul the front round
    > so it's pointing up the slope, and then hop out.
    >

    Yep, thats what I initially thought of, but I got a bit carried away somewhere.. Will doing this
    leave enough momentum to get out the other side?
     
  10. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    > idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log
    > is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means it's
    > too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    >
    > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below
    > the rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position
    > of trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not easy
    > and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    >
    > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > clear it :)
    >

    If it was over here the Barneys would pile up enough sticks to be able to ride over the log without
    touching it. Of course the sticks will get caught in your rear wheel ripping out half the spokes and
    derailleur.

    Mike
     
  11. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Michael Dart wrote:

    > If it was over here the Barneys would pile up enough sticks to be able to ride over the log
    > without touching it. Of course the sticks will get caught in your rear wheel ripping out half the
    > spokes and derailleur.

    I don't think my trails see enough traffic. However, there are tyre marks where people have
    ridden round it.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  12. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    spademan o---[) * wrote:

    >>Strangely, the 180 (more like 120, actually) nosepick is one that I'm giving favour to. I figure I
    >>might be able to flick the rear over to the other side of the log, and then haul the front round
    >>so it's pointing up the slope, and then hop out.
    >>
    >
    >
    > Yep, thats what I initially thought of, but I got a bit carried away somewhere.. Will doing this
    > leave enough momentum to get out the other side?

    No. It's basically going to involve stalling and then hopping out, or trying to ride out in
    lowest gear.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  13. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    > > idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the
    > > log is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means
    > > it's too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    > >
    > > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below
    > > the rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position
    > > of trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not
    > > easy and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    > >
    > > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > > clear it :)
    > >
    >
    > If it was over here the Barneys would pile up enough sticks to be able to ride over the log
    > without touching it. Of course the sticks will get
    caught
    > in your rear wheel ripping out half the spokes and derailleur.

    I thought your post would read summink like "You need more speed and travel. And body armour."

    Shaun aRe
     
  14. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]o.uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my
    local
    > > > trails. To give you some idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly
    > > > steep. At the bottom, the log is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6"
    > > > above the ground.
    This
    > > > means it's too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    > > >
    > > > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well
    > > > below the rear. I managed to get the front wheel
    on
    > > > the log, but then I was in another tricky position of trying to get
    the
    > > > rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm,
    not
    > > > easy and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    > > >
    > > > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > > > clear it :)
    > > >
    > >
    > > If it was over here the Barneys would pile up enough sticks to be able
    to
    > > ride over the log without touching it. Of course the sticks will get
    > caught
    > > in your rear wheel ripping out half the spokes and derailleur.
    >
    > I thought your post would read summink like "You need more speed and
    travel.
    > And body armour."
    >
    > Shaun aRe
    >

    ...and see how far I can bury myself into the far bank of the gully. ;^) Nope, this is definitely a
    job for skill and finesse.

    Mike - unless there's a possibility of jumping over the gully.
     
  15. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my
    > local
    > > > > trails. To give you some idea, the gulley is a couple of bike
    lengths
    > > > > on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log is about a
    foot
    > > > > in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground.
    > This
    > > > > means it's too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    > > > >
    > > > > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst
    the
    > > > > front wheel is well below the rear. I managed to get the front
    wheel
    > on
    > > > > the log, but then I was in another tricky position of trying to get
    > the
    > > > > rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm,
    > not
    > > > > easy and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    > > > >
    > > > > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to
    it
    > > > > soon enough, and will clear it :)
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > If it was over here the Barneys would pile up enough sticks to be able
    > to
    > > > ride over the log without touching it. Of course the sticks will get
    > > caught
    > > > in your rear wheel ripping out half the spokes and derailleur.
    > >
    > > I thought your post would read summink like "You need more speed and
    > travel.
    > > And body armour."
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    > >
    >
    > ...and see how far I can bury myself into the far bank of the gully. ;^)

    Yes! That's your style isn't it?

    > Nope, this is definitely a job for skill and finesse.
    >
    > Mike - unless there's a possibility of jumping over the gully.

    Heh.....

    Shaun aRe
     
  16. * "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my local trails. To give you some
    > idea, the gulley is a couple of bike lengths on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log
    > is about a foot in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground. This means it's
    > too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    >
    > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst the front wheel is well below
    > the rear. I managed to get the front wheel on the log, but then I was in another tricky position
    > of trying to get the rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm, not easy
    > and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    >
    > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to it soon enough, and will
    > clear it :)
    >

    Okay Bomba, looked at in more detail.

    First of all, your definitions of 'a bit steep' and 'a couple of bike lengths' are a bit
    vague. Tut tut.

    I we assume 'a bit steep' is a 30 degree slope and a couple of bike lengths means two standard
    wheelbases = 2*42" (approx) = 84" then to find the gap :- Determining one half of the gap, i.e.
    dividing the gap into two RH triangles, cos (30) = x/84 x = 84 * cos(30) x = 72.7

    Therefore the total length of the gap will be (72.7) * 2 + log diameter of 12" which works out to be
    157" or 13'1".

    Repeating this for other variables of 'a bit steep' and 'a couple of bike lengths' give: using 'a
    bit steep' as 30 degrees and 'a couple of bike lengths' as two total bike lengths i.e. from tyre
    edge to tyre edge i.e. (42" =26") * 2 = 136" gap length is 20'8" using 'a bit steep' as 45 degrees
    and 'a couple of bike lengths' as two standard wheelbases = 2*42" = 84" gap length is 10'11" using
    'a bit steep' as 45 degrees and 'a couple of bike lengths' as two total bike lengths i.e. from tyre
    edge to tyre edge i.e. (42" =26") * 2 = 136" gap lenght is 17'

    So in all cases the gap is definitely jumpable with the addition of a lip, I suggest template No. 10
    for the 17' and 21' gaps, template No. 6 for the 13' gap and template No. 5 for the 11 footer.

    http://www.j-harris.net/bike/steve/transition.htm

    Cheers,

    Steve E.
     
  17. "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Someone has moved a big log in to one of the gullies on one of my
    > local
    > > > > trails. To give you some idea, the gulley is a couple of bike
    lengths
    > > > > on each side and fairly steep. At the bottom, the log is about a
    foot
    > > > > in diameter, but where you cross, it's about 6" above the ground.
    > This
    > > > > means it's too high to roll over without mashing the chainring.
    > > > >
    > > > > It puts you in the difficult position of trying to wheelie whilst
    the
    > > > > front wheel is well below the rear. I managed to get the front
    wheel
    > on
    > > > > the log, but then I was in another tricky position of trying to get
    > the
    > > > > rear wheel over and lift the front half way up the other side. Hmm,
    > not
    > > > > easy and I'm still not sure of the best course of action.
    > > > >
    > > > > Only had a couple of goes at it this evening, but I'll come back to
    it
    > > > > soon enough, and will clear it :)
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > If it was over here the Barneys would pile up enough sticks to be able
    > to
    > > > ride over the log without touching it. Of course the sticks will get
    > > caught
    > > > in your rear wheel ripping out half the spokes and derailleur.
    > >
    > > I thought your post would read summink like "You need more speed and
    > travel.
    > > And body armour."
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    > >
    >
    > ...and see how far I can bury myself into the far bank of the gully. ;^) Nope, this is definitely
    > a job for skill and finesse.
    >
    > Mike - unless there's a possibility of jumping over the gully.

    See calculations on t'other post :p
     
  18. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    spademan o---[) * wrote:

    > Okay Bomba, looked at in more detail.
    >
    > First of all, your definitions of 'a bit steep' and 'a couple of bike lengths' are a bit vague.
    > Tut tut.
    >
    > I we assume 'a bit steep' is a 30 degree slope and a couple of bike lengths means two standard
    > wheelbases = 2*42" (approx) = 84" then to find the gap :- Determining one half of the gap, i.e.
    > dividing the gap into two RH triangles, cos (30) = x/84 x = 84 * cos(30) x = 72.7

    <...>

    LOL. How long did you spend on that? Quiet day at work I guess...

    It's too wide to clear with a lot of speed and a bunny hop, but not far off. A lip would certainly
    make it clearable.

    Hopefully, I'll get out tomorrow evening and go and measure it for you :)
     
  19. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    spademan o---[) * <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Okay Bomba, looked at in more detail.
    >
    > First of all, your definitions of 'a bit steep' and 'a couple of bike lengths' are a bit vague.
    > Tut tut.
    >
    > I we assume 'a bit steep' is a 30 degree slope and a couple of bike
    lengths
    > means two standard wheelbases = 2*42" (approx) = 84" then to find the gap
    :-
    > Determining one half of the gap, i.e. dividing the gap into two RH triangles, cos (30) = x/84
    > x = 84 * cos(30) x = 72.7
    >
    > Therefore the total length of the gap will be (72.7) * 2 + log diameter of 12" which works out to
    > be 157" or 13'1".
    >
    > Repeating this for other variables of 'a bit steep' and 'a couple of bike lengths' give: using 'a
    > bit steep' as 30 degrees and 'a couple of bike lengths' as
    two
    > total bike lengths i.e. from tyre edge to tyre edge i.e. (42" =26") * 2 = 136" gap length is 20'8"
    > using 'a bit steep' as 45 degrees and 'a couple of bike lengths' as
    two
    > standard wheelbases = 2*42" = 84" gap length is 10'11" using 'a bit steep' as 45 degrees and 'a
    > couple of bike lengths' as
    two
    > total bike lengths i.e. from tyre edge to tyre edge i.e. (42" =26") * 2 = 136" gap lenght is 17'
    >
    > So in all cases the gap is definitely jumpable with the addition of a lip,
    I
    > suggest template No. 10 for the 17' and 21' gaps, template No. 6 for the
    13'
    > gap and template No. 5 for the 11 footer.
    >
    > http://www.j-harris.net/bike/steve/transition.htm
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Steve E.

    Steve, you a daft sod you iz.

    ',;~}

    Shaun aRe
     
  20. > LOL. How long did you spend on that? Quiet day at work I guess...

    About half an hour, quiet time waiting for something to finish running. I didn't get enough time to
    try to calculate the speed you would need to clear each gap...

    >
    > It's too wide to clear with a lot of speed and a bunny hop, but not far off. A lip would certainly
    > make it clearable.
    >
    > Hopefully, I'll get out tomorrow evening and go and measure it for you :)
    >

    Thanks bomba, got to set my mind at rest y'know.

    Steve E.
     
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