New Unicycle Design commissioned !

Discussion in 'rec.sport.unicycling' started by fontiminal, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. fontiminal

    fontiminal Guest

    I have commissioned Dave at DM Engineering to build my hand driven
    unicycle.

    Will post photos of it when I actually get it.

    But I need advice before he puts it in to material affect.

    What size tyre should I untilise; 24" or 20" what would suit the hand
    crank method?

    Any advice on this greatly appreciated as he is about to materialise the
    design!

    Thanks.

    JJ


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  2. Catboy

    Catboy Guest

  3. I am going to go for a 20" with my seated hand-driven uni, and gear it
    up to whatever feels good. Good luck! I'll build mine one of these
    days.

    Andrew


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  4. mikepenton

    mikepenton Guest

    Start un-technical waffle:

    If you allow the legs on the frame (or would they be forks? dropouts?al
    enough, you could allow it to accomodate any size wheel up to say, a
    29". that way you could experiment with the wheel size & see what suits,
    without having to change the frame.

    End un-technical waffle.

    There's a suggestion in there somewhere...


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  5. mango

    mango Guest

    A friend of mine rides his giraffe by standing on pegs that are attached
    to the axle, and pedaling with one hand while he holds the frame above
    the pedals with his other hand. He can go very far like that if he
    doesnt have to go up too many hills.

    His giraffe has a 20" wheel. I'll try to ask him if he thinks a bigger
    wheel would be an improvement.

    Your custom uni sounds like a very cool idea and i look forward to
    pictures.


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  6. johnfoss

    johnfoss Guest

    Since you have a chain, you can gear it any way you want. So unless you
    intend to only cover lots of miles, I'd start with a 20" wheel. It will
    be lighter, which will make it easier to work with during the learning
    stages.

    If you follow the non-technical advice posted above, ask DM to leave
    room in the fork for a larger wheel. Then you have the option of trading
    up in the future.

    With a 20" wheel you also have tons more choices of rim and tire to work
    with.


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  7. total uni

    total uni Guest

  8. fontiminal

    fontiminal Guest

    Thanks for all the advise that you have given.

    So I am going for a 20" with a frame large enough for a 26".

    Have no plans for gearing yet, but once I am up and riding then perhaps
    I will.

    ´The friend who rides a giraffe with one arm not two has inspired me
    that this will actually be rideable, was wondering if I would manage'.


    Concerned I think that I will manage the balance issues with out my
    flailing arms! Arghh.



    JJ


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  9. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    On Tue, 11 Jan 2005 02:03:56 -0600, "fontiminal" wrote:

    >What size tyre should I untilise; 24" or 20" what would suit the hand
    >crank method?


    I would say 20". The smaller the tyre, the lower the forces that you
    will have to muster on the 'pedals'. And that's good because obviously
    your arms are much weaker than your legs.

    "Pedals" is an inappropriate word, BTW, because it refers to feet. But
    "manuals" doesn't ring right either.

    Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict
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  10. mikepenton

    mikepenton Guest

  11. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    mikepenton wrote:
    > *handles? ;) *

    Well, handles to me sounds like you mainly grip them, not 'operate'
    them. Maybe we should get used to manuals. I like it after tasting the
    word for a while. After all, a large organ (musical instrument) also has
    pedals and (at least one, but often several) manuals.

    Umm, strictly speaking I think that all of the foot-operated levers on
    an organ are collectively called "the pedal", and similarly all the
    hand-operated levers on one row are collectively called "a (one)
    manual". So, singular, not plural. Oh well.

    Klaas Bil


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  12. Klaas are you forgetting that this thing has a chain and can easily be
    geared to make a 20" wheel seem like a 29" and vice versa?


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  13. Klaas are you forgetting that this thing has a chain and can easily be
    geared to make a 20" wheel seem like a 29" and vice versa?


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  14. Klaas Bil

    Klaas Bil Guest

    andrew_carter wrote:
    > *Klaas are you forgetting that this thing has a chain and can easily
    > be geared to make a 20" wheel seem like a 29" and vice versa? *

    There you have a point Andrew. OK I guess I should have said that the
    relative weakness of the arms is something to keep in mind when choosing
    a gear ratio (along with the wheel size of course).

    Klaas Bil


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  15. Klaas Bil wrote:
    > *Umm, strictly speaking I think that all of the foot-operated levers
    > on an organ are collectively called "the pedal", and similarly all the
    > hand-operated levers on one row are collectively called "a (one)
    > manual". So, singular, not plural. Oh well.
    >
    > Klaas Bil *



    Klaas, are you forgetting we're talking about a unicycle? :p :D


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  16. Naomi

    Naomi Guest

    "Klaas Bil" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > mikepenton wrote:
    >> *handles? ;) *

    > Well, handles to me sounds like you mainly grip them, not 'operate'
    > them. Maybe we should get used to manuals. I like it after tasting the
    > word for a while. After all, a large organ (musical instrument) also has
    > pedals and (at least one, but often several) manuals.
    >


    I dunno: years ago cars had starting "handles" which you certainly had
    to turn by hand, so a precedent has been decades ago. Also barrel
    organs, which had hand cranked handles. Modern pipe/ electronic organs
    are rather more like banks of switches as the hands/feet hardly do much
    work.

    Nao
     
  17. johnfoss

    johnfoss Guest

    Naomi wrote:
    > *I dunno: years ago cars had starting "handles" which you
    > certainly had to turn by hand, so a precedent has been decades ago. *

    Though I don't think either of us is old enough to remember first-hand,
    these were also called cranks.

    Since it is possible to buy "pedals" that are made for hand-cranking, I
    would presume there is already a name for them. When I hand-crank my
    giraffe I just use pedals, though I switched from spikey rat-traps back
    to the original block ones for this purpose.

    Since the rest of the system is all built from a drivetrain designed for
    foot operation, I don't have a problem with calling them hand-pedals or
    something similar.

    Gearing:
    I'd start low. It's a lot of work learning to hand-crank a giraffe, and
    a higher ratio will only make it harder. I'd start with either 1:1 or
    something not much higher. Don't gear your wheel size past 24" at
    first.

    All of my giraffe hand-cranking is done with one hand on the pedal and
    the other holding either the frame or the seat. It is possible also to
    work the pedals with both hands, and I've seen people do this very well.
    I've never seen anyone bash themselves in the face while doing it, but
    this has inhibited me from learning the both-handed cranking. If you're
    sitting on a seat it will help hold the frame in place.


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  18. fontiminal

    fontiminal Guest

    johnfoss wrote:
    > *Though I don't think either of us is old enough to remember
    > first-hand, these were also called cranks.
    >
    > Since it is possible to buy "pedals" that are made for hand-cranking,
    > I would presume there is already a name for them. When I hand-crank my
    > giraffe I just use pedals, though I switched from spikey rat-traps
    > back to the original block ones for this purpose.
    >
    > ----cut---
    >
    > All of my giraffe hand-cranking is done with one hand on the pedal and
    > the other holding either the frame or the seat. It is possible also to
    > work the pedals with both hands, and I've seen people do this very
    > well. I've never seen anyone bash themselves in the face while doing
    > it, but this has inhibited me from learning the both-handed cranking.
    > If you're sitting on a seat it will help hold the frame in place. *




    Had not even occured to me till an earlier post that I could use one
    hand on the hadal (ped for feet, had for hands? <laughs>) and the other
    on some sort of handle in front of the seat. So I´ve asked Dave at DM to
    include a handle, that really has thrown him!

    Am concerned about being bashed in the face by the drive system, will
    have that totally enclosed since I could put my arm through it if I took
    a UPD. Perhaps a fulled enclosed helmet might be required for learning!
    <shakes head> Umm.

    Have decided on a 20" and no gearing, I think that will be easier to
    learn, larger wheels require greater torque to turn, my arms would be
    falling off if I go big.

    JJ

    p.s. Am I going mad actually having this thing built?




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  19. fontiminal

    fontiminal Guest

    johnfoss wrote:
    > *Though I don't think either of us is old enough to remember
    > first-hand, these were also called cranks.
    >
    > Since it is possible to buy "pedals" that are made for hand-cranking,
    > I would presume there is already a name for them. When I hand-crank my
    > giraffe I just use pedals, though I switched from spikey rat-traps
    > back to the original block ones for this purpose.
    >
    > ----cut---
    >
    > All of my giraffe hand-cranking is done with one hand on the pedal and
    > the other holding either the frame or the seat. It is possible also to
    > work the pedals with both hands, and I've seen people do this very
    > well. I've never seen anyone bash themselves in the face while doing
    > it, but this has inhibited me from learning the both-handed cranking.
    > If you're sitting on a seat it will help hold the frame in place. *




    Had not even occured to me till an earlier post that I could use one
    hand on the hadal (ped for feet, had for hands? <laughs>) and the other
    on some sort of handle in front of the seat. So I´ve asked Dave at DM to
    include a handle, that really has thrown him!

    Am concerned about being bashed in the face by the drive system, will
    have that totally enclosed since I could put my arm through it if I took
    a UPD. Perhaps a fulled enclosed helmet might be required for learning!
    <shakes head> Umm.

    Have decided on a 20" and no gearing, I think that will be easier to
    learn, larger wheels require greater torque to turn, my arms would be
    falling off if I go big.

    JJ

    p.s. Am I going mad actually having this thing built?




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  20. Ottawa Dave

    Ottawa Dave Guest

    I have seen a recumbant bike that you crank with your arms on the bike
    path near my home. The cranks work like a uni with both cranks faceing
    the ground. I think thats called kangaroo when used on a uni.
    The rider sits with the cranks in frunt of him at chest hight and sort
    of rows along with both arms.
    Cheers Dave


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