New Year pedolutionists

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Euan, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. Euan

    Euan Guest

    Back in the UK I'd take January off at the gym, it just got too crowded
    when the New Year Resolutionist crowd came to town. Don't get me wrong,
    I don't begrudge people striking out and trying to better their lives,
    it's just that without fail the gym would be so much quieter in the three
    to four weeks after Jan 1st.

    While the roads are still relatively quiet it's obvious that there's a
    lot of new cyclists out there. Great, numbers on the road are our best
    defence.

    Many of these pedolutionists have limited cycling skills. They can
    barely maintain a straight course just pedalling, ask them to change
    lanes or go up a hill and they're all over the place. I spent large
    chunks of my journey waiting for a sufficient gap in traffic so I could
    give them at least a meter overtaking. Again don't get me wrong, I'm
    glad to see them out on the road. I just wish there was some easy way I
    could take them down a side street and set them on the right track
    without coming across as a condescending prick.

    I've noticed a distinct increase in red light jumpers. Normally I just
    shrug my shoulders, mentally more than figuratively. However I did snap
    a bit today. I was heading up the hill on St Kilda Road, the one
    between Inkerman Street and Alma Road, when I was stopped by the
    pedestrian crossing in the middle of the hill. Well plow me if a
    pedolutionist didn't just sail on through. ``Helloooo, it's
    reeeeedddddd!'

    I forgot my pass to work today, truth to tell I thought I'd lost it and
    even went and got a new one sorted out (found it by the 'phone this
    afternoon). As a consequence my bike spent the day outside Parliament
    station.

    End of the day I was getting set for the ride home and a guy on crutches
    comes up and quizzes me about locking strategies. Soon as his legs
    mended he intends to start riding to work. Hurrah!

    Nearly home and hear that dreaded sound (no, not that one) of brakes on
    rim. That's odd. Stop bike and spin front wheel. All good. Spin
    back. Try to spin back. WTF?

    Look at mech and the barrel adjuster's been wound all the way out,
    locking on the rear brake. Not completely but enough to cause drag.
    Thirty kilometers, on a day when I could actually leave the panniers at
    work, all with the rear brake tearing my rim apart.

    Weird day.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
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  2. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-05, Euan (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > Look at mech and the barrel adjuster's been wound all the way out,
    > locking on the rear brake. Not completely but enough to cause drag.
    > Thirty kilometers, on a day when I could actually leave the panniers at
    > work, all with the rear brake tearing my rim apart.


    I found on several occasions on the tour last week that I was being
    more hardcore than necessary. Brakes on rim quite a few times. One
    time, the quick release had partly ondone itself!

    Oh well, it made the climbs more challenging :)

    --
    TimC
    In the beginning, there was nothing, which exploded.
    -- Terry Pratchett, Lords and Ladies
     
  3. On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 10:59:16 GMT, Euan wrote:

    > Many of these pedolutionists have limited cycling skills. They can
    > barely maintain a straight course just pedalling, ask them to change
    > lanes or go up a hill and they're all over the place. I spent large
    > chunks of my journey waiting for a sufficient gap in traffic so I could
    > give them at least a meter overtaking. Again don't get me wrong, I'm
    > glad to see them out on the road.


    In principle it's great to see people out riding on the work. In practice,
    though, I wish the ones on mountain bikes - nearly everyone I pass - would
    either pick another road (than the one I happen to be using!) or ride them
    in the mountains they were designed for.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  4. JayWoo

    JayWoo New Member

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    Yeah me too (ignore them), but Fu_k! One guy got on my nerve hardcore this morning along Wellington St Collingwood. Serial offender. Every fu_king light! Rode past him and gave him the biggest 'evils'. I'm sure he didn't get it. I used to run reds BIG time in my miss spent youth. So now I feel like I can't pull others up on it.

    Jay "bites lip as he *used* to run reds too" Woo
     
  5. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    Euan wrote - .
    >
    > While the roads are still relatively quiet it's obvious that there's a
    > lot of new cyclists out there. Great, numbers on the road are our best
    > defence...[but]... Many of these pedolutionists have limited cycling
    > skills.


    I think this might be the point at which the various State cycling groups
    could actually do some good if they understood their function better -
    people have made the effort to get a bike, get out of the car and ride on a
    city road. That commendable start will very likely IMHO fail because they
    will get sore or scared or fail to find kindred spirits on the road which
    add so much to the enjoyment of cycling..

    If you can remember back to that time we all went through when it was all
    new and confusing, probably with the wrong bike and making mistakes galore I
    recall the best thing that happened to me was to find a bunch that were
    friendly, gave sage advice and who really made you feel welcome and who I
    wanted to ride with - that got me hooked and the rest is history.

    Its picking up those new to cycling with encouragement and giving them
    cycling nous which will add permanent numbers out there - not sure how to
    organise that but that is I think the critical stage between creating a
    cyclist as opposed to just adding more unused metal lying around garages.

    best, Andrew
     
  6. In aus.bicycle on Thu, 05 Jan 2006 20:29:24 GMT
    Andrew Price <[email protected]> wrote:
    > If you can remember back to that time we all went through when it was all
    > new and confusing, probably with the wrong bike and making mistakes galore I
    > recall the best thing that happened to me was to find a bunch that were
    > friendly, gave sage advice and who really made you feel welcome and who I
    > wanted to ride with - that got me hooked and the rest is history.


    You are describing motorcycling before compulsory training :)

    Then, it was traditional for experienced riders to stop and chat with
    learners, and help them and give them tips. If you saw an L plate
    then you felt it was your duty to encourage and help them.

    Harder for cyclists of course - no L plates!

    Compulsory training has changed a little of that I think, as it's
    obviously no longer so needed.

    I think the idea of the bike clubs doing more is a good one. But how?
    If you build it will they come? Will people take time to go to some
    place for help, or do the current experienced riders need to seek out
    the inexperienced and work to be their friends?

    Zebee
     
  7. SuzieB

    SuzieB New Member

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    I've been very lucky to have the benefit of Euan's help to get me back riding and all it took was about 20 minutes of riding around the local netball courts doing various drills and a little bit of time on the road explaining where I should be riding to feel confident and safe on the road. I think in a hour you could get most people riding in a reasonably competent manner. Maybe some additional reading on road rules that apply to cyclists and send them on their merry way.

    I think it's time Euan and I got involved with our local BUG. The BUG doesn't meet again until February and are more into the touring group they run than in bicycle advocacy as far as I can tell. If we can weedle our way in to the group I'd be interested in running some local bicycle education courses. Would there be liability issues with doing something like that?
     
  8. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    Take a look at Bike Ed
    www.bikeed.com.au
    It's a bit more kids-orientated but does also include training-for-trainers
    OR
    http://www.travelsmart.gov.au/toolkits.html

    The UK Sustrans program is worth a look too
     
  9. warrwych

    warrwych New Member

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    Yes, if you do build it, they will come.... and ask for more!! Brag Alert: Warragul Cycling Club has several initiatives (one for which it won a Vic Sport & Rec award in 05) to do just this, both for juniors and adults. We will recommence and expand these activities in February this year (Cycle Skills, recreational group, more social/training rides etc), partly in response to the many requests we have received late last year for more. (so stay tuned to the local rag, or contact the club if you are interested in participating!)

    So, absolutely, build it (and build it so that it is quality, and is meeting the needs of the participants) and they WILL come.
     
  10. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Euan wrote:

    > Nearly home and hear that dreaded sound (no, not that one) of brakes on
    > rim. That's odd. Stop bike and spin front wheel. All good. Spin
    > back. Try to spin back. WTF?
    >
    > Look at mech and the barrel adjuster's been wound all the way out,
    > locking on the rear brake. Not completely but enough to cause drag.
    > Thirty kilometers, on a day when I could actually leave the panniers at
    > work, all with the rear brake tearing my rim apart.


    How did you manage to ride home (30km) without noticing your brake was
    on?

    Talking of red light runners ... riding to the Williamstown crit on
    Wed, some old bloke on a roady, in an aust abalone jersey along
    Footscray Rd .. "boom" through at least 2 red lights. He wasn't
    colourblind, he stopped at the T intersections ! Arsehole ... We'd
    catch him, he'd sail on through ... then when the traffic got tight
    around the trucks the old turd chopped me almost into a truck. This
    was no novice, just one of those shits who's sure that the rules don't
    apply to him.
     
  11. LotteBum

    LotteBum New Member

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    I'm with Euan 100% on this one. Same thing tends to happen early in Spring every year - everyone comes out of hibernation to get fit for summer.

    I've very little patience for these people - especially the dickwad I saw wearing bib knicks (I don't think he realised that you're meant to wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them these days!?!) whilst riding - sorry, wobbling - in Peak Hour on Ipswich Road.... in the gutter. Fool.

    I find too often if I pass on advice to someone, they generally just look at me funny possibly because they're not used to people being sociable/nice/helpful on the roads.

    It's times like these I don't blame people for riding Coronation Drive rather than using the - hopeless at the best of times - bike path which runs alongside the road.

    Lotte
     
  12. warrwych

    warrwych New Member

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    I see a fair number of triathlete types (or they *could* be time triallists???) this time of year wearing bib knicks and bib knicks only. What is with that???? Or is it a multisport thing??? And they do that gaping grimace thing with their heads twisted off to one side. Might as well wear your bra & undies on the outside and spin your head around 360 degrees - it's one way to kill the competition :D
     
  13. Jules

    Jules Guest

    > I wish the ones on mountain bikes - nearly everyone I pass - would
    > either pick another road (than the one I happen to be using!) or ride them
    > in the mountains they were designed for.


    Why's that?

    Jules
     
  14. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Damn fine idea. :) There are potential liability probs, check if the BUG has Incorporation Association etc. I know the *mob* mentioned below are investigating this for 2006.

    <commence sales pitch here>

    By the way, if you're in the inner 'burbs of Melbourne, or as Jay Woo's case, travel through them, we here at YarraBUG would love to hear from you.

    Have any ride ideas, Adult bike ed stuff, or any cycling infrastructure improvements in the Yarra area? Feel most free to contact us. For more on this bonus free offer: email [email protected] or visit our glittering showroom, *ahem* website, at: http://www.yarrabug.org

    Also in this introductory offer, there's the chance of winning double passes to a new TdF film "Overcoming". So join YarraBUG! We're fun, do lots of advocacy and occasionally give away stuff. :D

    </ sales pitch here>
     
  15. warrwych

    warrwych New Member

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    The Americans are big on what they call "bike rodeos", which are basically a collection of activity stations whichparticipants rotate through, doing & learning stuff at each station. Some culiminate in a linked sequence of activities (like an obstacle course, without too many obstacles) to demonstrate achieved competencies. At Warragul we have used some of these concepts and activities with great success. It's fun, not boring because you get to change activity after a shortish period of time, and participants get to demonstrate what they have learned in a "semi competitive" way.

    Lots on the www in regard to bike rodeos.
     
  16. Parbs

    Parbs Guest

    "Jules" asked...
    >
    > Why's that?
    >

    'Cause its soooo embarrassing to get passed on you carbon latte racer by the guy with muddy shoes, coloured socks and helmet visor
    on the mountain bike with big DJ forks running 2.5" tyres at 20psi and a big smile on his face ;-)

    Parbs
     
  17. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    LotteBum wrote:
    > wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    > these days!?!)


    Hmmm, well I use them on the commuter and the SS. On the commuter
    because I don't trust my ability to unclip quick enough in CBD traffic,
    ad on the SS because I want to ride to the shops in whatever I'm wearing.

    DaveB
     
  18. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    LotteBum wrote:

    > doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them these days!?!)


    I have two bikes with Look pedals and one with toe straps. I know toe straps
    are just soooo last century but those Superb Pro pedals are just so ....
    superb, and I'm not giving them up.

    Theo
     
  19. daveL

    daveL Guest

    Hey,

    I've been lurking here for a little while now but this is my first post,
    so hi all.

    I suppose that I'm not a serious cyclist, but I moved to Melbourne from
    Adelaide this year and work on the opposote side of the city to where I
    live, so (due to a lack of drivers licence and dislike of crowds on
    public transport) I commute along about 18km each way to work on my
    reasonablly cheap MTB.

    Michael Warner wrote:
    > In principle it's great to see people out riding on the work. In practice,
    > though, I wish the ones on mountain bikes - nearly everyone I pass - would
    > either pick another road (than the one I happen to be using!) or ride them
    > in the mountains they were designed for.


    I'm not entirely sure what this comment is getting at though. I decided
    on a MTB when I moved here as the comparable roadie I could have got for
    the same amount of cash would have proven a lot less robust and more
    difficult for me to maintain. With the MTB I also have the option of
    getting some road tyres and thereby get a bit of general purpose usage
    for my somewhat limited dollar.

    I have been riding for maany years now and think that I have enough
    skill and control (if somewhat lacking in the fitness department) to not
    endanger anyone else or encroach on other riders, and a realistic enough
    idea of my general fitness and ability to not act like too much of a wanker.

    So what exactly is wrong about me commuting on my MTB? I really enjoy my
    daily rides and would hate to think that the people passing me (nearly
    every one :) had a problem.

    Cheers

    --
    daveL
     
  20. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 06 Jan 2006 09:51:56 +1100
    DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:
    > LotteBum wrote:
    >> wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    >> these days!?!)

    >
    > Hmmm, well I use them on the commuter and the SS. On the commuter
    > because I don't trust my ability to unclip quick enough in CBD traffic,
    > ad on the SS because I want to ride to the shops in whatever I'm wearing.


    I used them when I was riding to work because I couldn't see the point
    in having to buy expensive pedals and expensive shoes.

    If you want to get people into cycling, saying "you have to buy all
    this specialist shit or you'll get sworn at and called a fool" is
    probably not the way to do it.

    When new motorcyclists ask about riding kit I don't say "Have to get
    the right boots" I say "wear something that covers your ankles with
    leather - you can buy fancy boots if you want to but it's not
    required".

    Clipless pedals aren't needed to ride a pushbike. Hell, tying your
    feet to the bike isn't needed.

    Zebee
     
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