New Year pedolutionists

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Euan, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. A5Hi5M

    A5Hi5M Guest

    "warrwych" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > LotteBum Wrote:
    >> I'm with Euan 100% on this one. Same thing tends to happen early in
    >> Spring every year - everyone comes out of hibernation to get fit for
    >> summer.
    >>
    >> I've very little patience for these people - especially the dickwad I
    >> saw wearing bib knicks (I don't think he realised that you're meant to
    >> wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    >> these days!?!) whilst riding - sorry, wobbling - in Peak Hour on Ipswich
    >> Road.... in the gutter. Fool.
    >>
    >> I find too often if I pass on advice to someone, they generally just
    >> look at me funny possibly because they're not used to people being
    >> sociable/nice/helpful on the roads.
    >>
    >> It's times like these I don't blame people for riding Coronation Drive
    >> rather than using the - hopeless at the best of times - bike path which
    >> runs alongside the road.
    >>
    >> Lotte

    >
    >
    > I see a fair number of triathlete types (or they *could* be time
    > triallists???) this time of year wearing bib knicks and bib knicks
    > only. What is with that???? Or is it a multisport thing??? And they
    > do that gaping grimace thing with their heads twisted off to one side.
    > Might as well wear your bra & undies on the outside and spin your head
    > around 360 degrees - it's one way to kill the competition :D
    >
    >
    > --
    > warrwych
    >


    Jerseys weigh too much! And as an added bonus, you can try to blend in the
    tan lines on your arms by wearing bib knicks only.

    ;)
    Ash
     


  2. warrwych

    warrwych New Member

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    Hi DaveL

    you will have to excuse some of our banter - we all ride a range of bikes here and for a range of different reasons. I also ride my mtb to work (the same one I rode Mont on - its a bike, it goes), so it's gotta be good. :p

    I think Mr Warner was getting at that most newbies to the sport, grossly generalising here, buy some kind of mtbas their first bike. When pitted against peak hour traffic, and combined with undeveloped or underdeveloped skills, they can be hazardous because they are slower and "harder" to manouvere in traffic. It's a bit like a keen nissan z driver getting stuck behind an L plater driving a combi.
     
  3. blah

    blah Guest

    There's nothing wrong with you riding an MTB. Stupid cranky original
    post, IMO.
     
  4. daveL

    daveL Guest

    warrwych wrote:
    > you will have to excuse some of our banter - we all ride a range of
    > bikes here and for a range of different reasons. I also ride my mtb to
    > work (the same one I rode Mont on - its a bike, it goes), so it's gotta
    > be good. :p


    Sounds right to me :)

    > I think Mr Warner was getting at that most newbies to the sport,
    > grossly generalising here, buy some kind of mtbas their first bike.
    > When pitted against peak hour traffic, and combined with undeveloped or
    > underdeveloped skills, they can be hazardous because they are slower and
    > "harder" to manouvere in traffic. It's a bit like a keen nissan z driver
    > getting stuck behind an L plater driving a combi.


    Heh. Funny you mention that. After some not so subtle intimidation by my
    beloved, I'm learning to drive now, (mostly as a 'just in case' measure)
    and I'd reckon that I'm probably safer on my bike.

    Of course whether that is due to my bike skills, or my complete lack of
    driving skills is entirely open to interpretation ;)

    --
    daveL
     
  5. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    LotteBum wrote:
    >
    > I'm with Euan 100% on this one. Same thing tends to happen early in
    > Spring every year - everyone comes out of hibernation to get fit for
    > summer.
    >
    > I've very little patience for these people - especially the dickwad I
    > saw wearing bib knicks (I don't think he realised that you're meant to
    > wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    > these days!?!) whilst riding - sorry, wobbling - in Peak Hour on Ipswich
    > Road.... in the gutter. Fool.

    <snip>

    ROFLMAO... see, if it wasn't for the toe straps, I would've thought
    paybe they were part of the unadvertised Peloton Cycles bib knicks
    ride... I saw a chick out in a crop top and bib knicks at the Gold
    Coast. Weird. At least get a sleeveless jersey (and some dt's), like
    Abby does...

    Tam
     
  6. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    DaveB wrote:
    >
    > LotteBum wrote:
    > > wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    > > these days!?!)

    >
    > Hmmm, well I use them on the commuter and the SS. On the commuter
    > because I don't trust my ability to unclip quick enough in CBD traffic,
    > ad on the SS because I want to ride to the shops in whatever I'm wearing.
    >
    > DaveB


    If your toe straps are loose enough that they're quicker to get out of
    than clipless pedals, they might as well not be there ;)

    Tam
     
  7. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    Tamyka Bell wrote:
    > If your toe straps are loose enough that they're quicker to get out of
    > than clipless pedals, they might as well not be there ;)
    >
    > Tam


    They're really only there to prevent my foot slipping off the pedal, and
    to allow me to put the foot further forward than plain platform pedals
    (similar position to with my clipless) certainly not for efficient
    pedalling. Largely in response to old memories of my first road bike in
    the early eighties which had metal platform pedals with "spikes" to
    prevent the foot slipping. Problem was, when the foot did slip the
    spikes went into what ever skin was nearby (so many bloody shins :( ).

    DaveB
     
  8. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    DaveB wrote:
    >
    > Tamyka Bell wrote:
    > > If your toe straps are loose enough that they're quicker to get out of
    > > than clipless pedals, they might as well not be there ;)
    > >
    > > Tam

    >
    > They're really only there to prevent my foot slipping off the pedal, and
    > to allow me to put the foot further forward than plain platform pedals
    > (similar position to with my clipless) certainly not for efficient
    > pedalling. Largely in response to old memories of my first road bike in
    > the early eighties which had metal platform pedals with "spikes" to
    > prevent the foot slipping. Problem was, when the foot did slip the
    > spikes went into what ever skin was nearby (so many bloody shins :( ).
    >
    > DaveB


    Ouch! I thought those pedals were just so you'd wear shoes, instead of
    riding barefoot. That's why Mum and Dad bought them for us, anyway ;)

    Tam
     
  9. On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 22:45:34 GMT, Parbs wrote:

    > 'Cause its soooo embarrassing to get passed on you carbon latte racer by the guy with muddy shoes, coloured socks and helmet visor
    > on the mountain bike with big DJ forks running 2.5" tyres at 20psi and a big smile on his face ;-)


    If that ever happens, even on my cheap alloy commuter, I'll let you
    know :)


    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  10. On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:04:52 GMT, daveL wrote:

    > I'm not entirely sure what this comment is getting at though.


    Ok, I'll spell it out - the problem is that MTBs are slow and wide,
    and trying to pass them safely is often a bit of a worry in busy traffic.
    Many are also ridden rather erratically, although that's not the bike's
    fault.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  11. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 6 Jan 2006 12:34:31 +1030
    Michael Warner <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:04:52 GMT, daveL wrote:
    >
    >> I'm not entirely sure what this comment is getting at though.

    >
    > Ok, I'll spell it out - the problem is that MTBs are slow and wide,
    > and trying to pass them safely is often a bit of a worry in busy traffic.
    > Many are also ridden rather erratically, although that's not the bike's
    > fault.


    slow and wide?

    percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    your average car is concerned.

    Slow is only a problem for other cyclists. Who are snobbish bastards
    it seems...

    Zebee
     
  12. "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:

    > If you want to get people into cycling, saying "you have to buy all
    > this specialist shit or you'll get sworn at and called a fool" is
    > probably not the way to do it.


    I think Lotte was having a go at him more for his truly dorky riding
    clothes, and self-endangering riding behaviour.

    > When new motorcyclists ask about riding kit I don't say "Have to get
    > the right boots" I say "wear something that covers your ankles with
    > leather - you can buy fancy boots if you want to but it's not
    > required".


    Yep, you don't have to wear 'wannnabe road racer' clothes nor carbon road
    shoes. But get some shoes that help your pedalling action, especially if
    you're going to be riding any lengthy distance.

    > Clipless pedals aren't needed to ride a pushbike. Hell, tying your
    > feet to the bike isn't needed.


    Not needed, but if you ride a lot, for longish distances, climb hills or
    ride a MTB on forest tracks, they do make your riding an awful lot better.
    Your choice, ignore those with experience if you like.

    Cheers
    Peter
     
  13. On 6 Jan 2006 02:12:02 GMT, Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    > your average car is concerned.


    What is the relevance of the width of a car? The point is that I have
    to give them a significantly wider berth than road bikes.

    > Slow is only a problem for other cyclists. Who are snobbish bastards
    > it seems...


    Slow is not the problem. Slow /and in my way when I can't safely pass/
    is the problem.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  14. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    Michael Warner wrote:
    > Slow is not the problem. Slow /and in my way when I can't safely pass/
    > is the problem.
    >


    Sounds like the standard argument from motorists to me.

    DaveB
     
  15. coowoowoo

    coowoowoo New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
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    I hear ya... bib knicks only is just plain wrong to look at and i dont care how buff the guy is wearing them. Always makes me think that they have walked off the strongman set in the circus. Worse if they have a hairy chest.

    But back onto the pedolutionists.. have patience everyone.. the "i got a new bike for christmas brigade" will soon split into two camps. Those that chuck it after a few weeks and those that quickly learn the right road ettiquette as they plod through January and embark on the road to better health.
    And if they havent worked out that red means stop and green means go, then i think its open slather on any comments that you feel deserve to be made to them.
     
  16. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 6 Jan 2006 13:17:20 +1100
    Peter Signorini <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:
    >
    >> If you want to get people into cycling, saying "you have to buy all
    >> this specialist shit or you'll get sworn at and called a fool" is
    >> probably not the way to do it.

    >
    > I think Lotte was having a go at him more for his truly dorky riding
    > clothes, and self-endangering riding behaviour.


    Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".

    After all, the lycra loonies are dorkish, it's just that it isn't done
    to say so *here* because it marks as "one of us". Everyone else
    thinks they look like adults playing dressups. I mean pretending to
    be part of a pro team, really! All the stickers and team names and
    silly paintjobs and fancy gadgets - trust me, dorky is what the people
    who see are thinking.

    The riding behaviour was the point of the thread I thought. To say
    "here are these people who need help to keep riding". Saying "you
    have to reach my standards before I will treat you decently" is not
    going to help is it!


    > Yep, you don't have to wear 'wannnabe road racer' clothes nor carbon road
    > shoes. But get some shoes that help your pedalling action, especially if
    > you're going to be riding any lengthy distance.
    >


    But it isn't required. It's just nice to have if you are going to be
    all serious.

    It isn't a sign of someone who needs to be insulted and ignored and
    told he's a fool.

    Tell people "you have to have this and that fancy shit to ride" and
    will they ride? There's a limit...


    >> Clipless pedals aren't needed to ride a pushbike. Hell, tying your
    >> feet to the bike isn't needed.

    >
    > Not needed, but if you ride a lot, for longish distances, climb hills or
    > ride a MTB on forest tracks, they do make your riding an awful lot better.
    > Your choice, ignore those with experience if you like.
    >


    You miss the point. Sure - nice to have if you are doing heaps of
    fancy riding.

    But not required. Not needed to ride a pushbike. To say they are,
    and therefore anyone who doesn't have them is to be disdained...
    that's silly.

    And self-defeating if you want to encourage more people.

    Me, I don't care if someone is riding a clapped out postie bike or a
    50cc scooter wearing shorts and thongs. Yeah, I'll mention to them
    that the bike changes gear better if you wear closed shoes and that
    jeans mean your kneecaps don't get filthy and you might not get as
    much gravel rash if you come off, but as I want them on a motorcycle
    instead of a car I'm not going to abuse them.

    Indeed it seems to me they are people who need an experienced rider to
    make friends with them and give them tips about inexpensive and easy
    ways to have more fun. Who doesn't start from "look you lower life
    form, learn How We Do It or sell the thing"


    Zebee
     
  17. On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 13:39:38 +1100, DaveB wrote:

    > Sounds like the standard argument from motorists to me.


    Well, yeah, it's annoying when I'm driving, too. I'd be a hypocrite if I
    claimed to suddenly develop infinite patience when I get on the bike :)

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  18. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > slow and wide?
    >
    > percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    > your average car is concerned.
    >
    > Slow is only a problem for other cyclists. Who are snobbish bastards
    > it seems...


    First RAV4s are too high, now MTBs are too wide. I'm sure some would be
    happier on the bus! (A small bus for off-peak).

    Theo
     
  19. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Michael Warner wrote:
    > On 6 Jan 2006 02:12:02 GMT, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >
    >> percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    >> your average car is concerned.

    >
    > What is the relevance of the width of a car? The point is that I have
    > to give them a significantly wider berth than road bikes.
    >
    >> Slow is only a problem for other cyclists. Who are snobbish bastards
    >> it seems...

    >
    > Slow is not the problem. Slow /and in my way when I can't safely pass/
    > is the problem.


    The thinking driver's (and now rider's) argument. LOL.

    Theo
     
  20. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Peter Signorini wrote:
    > "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:


    >> Clipless pedals aren't needed to ride a pushbike. Hell, tying your
    >> feet to the bike isn't needed.


    > Not needed, but if you ride a lot, for longish distances, climb hills
    > or ride a MTB on forest tracks, they do make your riding an awful lot
    > better. Your choice, ignore those with experience if you like.


    Sounds like an argument for having a 4WD.

    Theo
     
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