New Year pedolutionists

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Euan, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. ritcho

    ritcho New Member

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    I don't think you have to wait for few weeks - the first wet day discourages at least half of them. Of course that _could_ be a few weeks...

    Ritch
     


  2. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >
    > In aus.bicycle on Fri, 6 Jan 2006 13:17:20 +1100
    > Peter Signorini <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:
    > >
    > >> If you want to get people into cycling, saying "you have to buy all
    > >> this specialist shit or you'll get sworn at and called a fool" is
    > >> probably not the way to do it.

    > >
    > > I think Lotte was having a go at him more for his truly dorky riding
    > > clothes, and self-endangering riding behaviour.

    >
    > Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".


    No, dude, seriously, go back to the Lotte's message, ffs. The guy was
    wearing bib knicks with no shirt. No cotton t-shirt, no button-up
    business shirt, no lycra cycling jersey, no shirt at all. That's not
    dorky clothes. It's like going out for dinner and forgetting your
    pants/skirt/dress.

    > After all, the lycra loonies are dorkish, it's just that it isn't done
    > to say so *here* because it marks as "one of us". Everyone else
    > thinks they look like adults playing dressups. I mean pretending to
    > be part of a pro team, really! All the stickers and team names and
    > silly paintjobs and fancy gadgets - trust me, dorky is what the people
    > who see are thinking.


    Really? I thought they were just checking out my arse. Just goes to
    show.

    I don't know any decent riders who think that wearing team gear makes
    them cool. In fact I think most cyclists choose gear based on quality
    and price, and then just pick the best colours available.

    > The riding behaviour was the point of the thread I thought. To say
    > "here are these people who need help to keep riding". Saying "you
    > have to reach my standards before I will treat you decently" is not
    > going to help is it!

    <snip the rest>

    Are you not familiar with Ipswich Rd? 80km/h and full of traffic
    including lots of trucks? That guy did need help to keep riding.
    Wobbling on Ipswich Rd, not paying attention to where he's going,
    sitting in the gutter - all he's lacking is a sign that says "I am a
    dickhead, please run me over."

    Go on, 'fess up - you went riding in bib knicks without a shirt, didn't
    you ;)

    Oh and FYI, I don't think there's anyone out there who is more helpful
    with gumbies than Lotte. She's been a huge influence on my cycling, and
    if you diss her opinion again, I might have to flex my biceps :p

    Tam
     
  3. On 6 Jan 2006 02:46:22 GMT, Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > After all, the lycra loonies are dorkish, it's just that it isn't done
    > to say so *here* because it marks as "one of us". Everyone else
    > thinks they look like adults playing dressups. I mean pretending to
    > be part of a pro team, really! All the stickers and team names and
    > silly paintjobs and fancy gadgets - trust me, dorky is what the people
    > who see are thinking.


    The "pro team" outfits are popular mostly because they get flogged off
    cheap when they're outdated, I think, even though they're generally not
    as good as the stuff sold purely on the strength of its brand name.

    I picked up Phonak bib shorts and jersey very cheap recently, possible
    because Tyler Hamilton's name has centre stage on the back :)

    > It isn't a sign of someone who needs to be insulted and ignored and
    > told he's a fool.


    The only things I ever suggest to other cyclists are that they oil their
    chain or get some lights, and often get a mouthful in return anyway.
    Obviously they can't tolerate roadie snobbery either.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  4. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".


    > Indeed it seems to me they are people who need an experienced rider to
    > make friends with them and give them tips about inexpensive and easy
    > ways to have more fun. Who doesn't start from "look you lower life
    > form, learn How We Do It or sell the thing"


    <thunderous applause> Well said Zebee, what matters is that they got on a
    bike.

    Theo
     
  5. Jules

    Jules Guest

    > 'Cause its soooo embarrassing to get passed on you carbon latte racer by the guy with muddy shoes, coloured socks and helmet visor
    > on the mountain bike with big DJ forks running 2.5" tyres at 20psi and a big smile on his face ;-)
    >
    > Parbs
    >
    >

    haha... Precisely ;-)
     
  6. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Tamyka Bell wrote:
    > Zebee Johnstone wrote:


    >> Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".


    > Really? I thought they were just checking out my arse. Just goes to
    > show.


    We're going to need a gif tojudge that Tam.

    >> The riding behaviour was the point of the thread I thought. To say
    >> "here are these people who need help to keep riding". Saying "you
    >> have to reach my standards before I will treat you decently" is not
    >> going to help is it!

    > <snip the rest>


    > Are you not familiar with Ipswich Rd? 80km/h and full of traffic
    > including lots of trucks? That guy did need help to keep riding.
    > Wobbling on Ipswich Rd, not paying attention to where he's going,
    > sitting in the gutter - all he's lacking is a sign that says "I am a
    > dickhead, please run me over."


    Get real. Only good fast riders allowed on that road?

    > Go on, 'fess up - you went riding in bib knicks without a shirt,
    > didn't you ;)


    That would be interesting to see. :) Send me a photo of that please Zebee.

    Theo
     
  7. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Jules wrote:
    >
    > > 'Cause its soooo embarrassing to get passed on you carbon latte racer by the guy with muddy shoes, coloured socks and helmet visor
    > > on the mountain bike with big DJ forks running 2.5" tyres at 20psi and a big smile on his face ;-)
    > >
    > > Parbs
    > >
    > >

    > haha... Precisely ;-)


    I suppose if I ever bought a carbon latte racer, I'd have a chance of
    finding out. But I wouldn't be taking it offroad. ;)

    Tam
     
  8. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Theo Bekkers wrote:
    >
    > Tamyka Bell wrote:
    > > Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    >
    > >> Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".

    >
    > > Really? I thought they were just checking out my arse. Just goes to
    > > show.

    >
    > We're going to need a gif tojudge that Tam.


    There have been jpegs, but it's all been done before.

    > >> The riding behaviour was the point of the thread I thought. To say
    > >> "here are these people who need help to keep riding". Saying "you
    > >> have to reach my standards before I will treat you decently" is not
    > >> going to help is it!

    > > <snip the rest>

    >
    > > Are you not familiar with Ipswich Rd? 80km/h and full of traffic
    > > including lots of trucks? That guy did need help to keep riding.
    > > Wobbling on Ipswich Rd, not paying attention to where he's going,
    > > sitting in the gutter - all he's lacking is a sign that says "I am a
    > > dickhead, please run me over."

    >
    > Get real. Only good fast riders allowed on that road?


    No, but I have a sneaking suspicion only switched-on cyclists manage it.
    I rode Ipswich Rd once and it scared the crap out of me, and it takes a
    lot (on road, anyway) to scare the crap out of me.

    > > Go on, 'fess up - you went riding in bib knicks without a shirt,
    > > didn't you ;)

    >
    > That would be interesting to see. :) Send me a photo of that please Zebee.


    You better share that one, Theo ;)
     
  9. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 06 Jan 2006 13:05:01 +1000
    Tamyka Bell <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >>
    >> Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".

    >
    > No, dude, seriously, go back to the Lotte's message, ffs. The guy was
    > wearing bib knicks with no shirt. No cotton t-shirt, no button-up
    > business shirt, no lycra cycling jersey, no shirt at all. That's not
    > dorky clothes. It's like going out for dinner and forgetting your
    > pants/skirt/dress.
    >


    Really?

    Doesn't look like it to me.

    LOoks just as dorkish as any other lycra.

    It only looks like it to you because he's not displaying the right
    markers.

    To other people who don't know the markers some cyclists see as dork
    and not dork it's *all* dork.

    Shirt or no.


    > I don't know any decent riders who think that wearing team gear makes
    > them cool. In fact I think most cyclists choose gear based on quality
    > and price, and then just pick the best colours available.


    So? It's still playing dressups as far as non-cyclists are concerned.

    Dork is in the eye of the beholder.

    > Go on, 'fess up - you went riding in bib knicks without a shirt, didn't
    > you ;)


    I'd be arrested :)

    >
    > Oh and FYI, I don't think there's anyone out there who is more helpful
    > with gumbies than Lotte. She's been a huge influence on my cycling, and
    > if you diss her opinion again, I might have to flex my biceps :p
    >


    Flex away. If she calls someone a dork for wearing clothing as dorky
    as everyone else, I'll just bring a measure tape!

    Zebee
     
  10. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 6 Jan 2006 10:50:19 +0800
    Theo Bekkers <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >
    >> slow and wide?
    >>
    >> percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    >> your average car is concerned.
    >>
    >> Slow is only a problem for other cyclists. Who are snobbish bastards
    >> it seems...

    >
    > First RAV4s are too high, now MTBs are too wide. I'm sure some would be
    > happier on the bus! (A small bus for off-peak).


    If an MTB is too wide, then what would they think of Guzzis!

    Yeah, I know, they are a small bus...

    Zebee
    - who is arranging to go to Canberra to check out greenspeeds. You
    want wide?
     
  11. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    daveL wrote:
    > Hey,
    >
    > I've been lurking here for a little while now but this is my first post,
    > so hi all.
    >

    [chomp]


    > So what exactly is wrong about me commuting on my MTB? I really enjoy my
    > daily rides and would hate to think that the people passing me (nearly
    > every one :) had a problem.


    Absolutely nothing. Keep on riding :)
     
  12. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    > In aus.bicycle on Fri, 6 Jan 2006 12:34:31 +1030
    > Michael Warner <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:04:52 GMT, daveL wrote:
    > >
    > >> I'm not entirely sure what this comment is getting at though.

    > >
    > > Ok, I'll spell it out - the problem is that MTBs are slow and wide,
    > > and trying to pass them safely is often a bit of a worry in busy traffic.
    > > Many are also ridden rather erratically, although that's not the bike's
    > > fault.

    >
    > slow and wide?
    >
    > percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    > your average car is concerned.
    >
    > Slow is only a problem for other cyclists. Who are snobbish bastards
    > it seems...


    Cyclists are just like everyone else. Hold the front page!
     
  13. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >
    > In aus.bicycle on Fri, 06 Jan 2006 13:05:01 +1000
    > Tamyka Bell <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Dorky clothes is just shorthand for "not one of us".

    > >
    > > No, dude, seriously, go back to the Lotte's message, ffs. The guy was
    > > wearing bib knicks with no shirt. No cotton t-shirt, no button-up
    > > business shirt, no lycra cycling jersey, no shirt at all. That's not
    > > dorky clothes. It's like going out for dinner and forgetting your
    > > pants/skirt/dress.
    > >

    >
    > Really?
    >
    > Doesn't look like it to me.
    >
    > LOoks just as dorkish as any other lycra.


    Well I suppose in a small African nation, people might think that your
    lack of pants/skirt/dress looks pretty normal too. Doesn't mean you
    shouldn't get arrested here.

    > It only looks like it to you because he's not displaying the right
    > markers.
    >
    > To other people who don't know the markers some cyclists see as dork
    > and not dork it's *all* dork.
    >
    > Shirt or no.


    Nah, it's like running through Brisbane CBD with no shirt on. It's dork.
    You can only do it with a support crew of others dressed the same.

    > > I don't know any decent riders who think that wearing team gear makes
    > > them cool. In fact I think most cyclists choose gear based on quality
    > > and price, and then just pick the best colours available.

    >
    > So? It's still playing dressups as far as non-cyclists are concerned.


    But since when do the opinions of non-cyclists matter?

    > Dork is in the eye of the beholder.


    Not beholding any?

    > > Go on, 'fess up - you went riding in bib knicks without a shirt, didn't
    > > you ;)

    >
    > I'd be arrested :)


    Ahem. I didn't say nothing on your top half. I said no shirt. Crop tops
    allowed. (As I argued with the boys on the bibknicks ride)

    > > Oh and FYI, I don't think there's anyone out there who is more helpful
    > > with gumbies than Lotte. She's been a huge influence on my cycling, and
    > > if you diss her opinion again, I might have to flex my biceps :p
    > >

    >
    > Flex away. If she calls someone a dork for wearing clothing as dorky
    > as everyone else, I'll just bring a measure tape!


    Make sure it's a long one ;)

    Tam
     
  14. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > Zebee
    > - who is arranging to go to Canberra to check out greenspeeds. You
    > want wide?


    why would you go to Canberra? They're made in Melbourne. A good mate
    of mine works there :)
     
  15. On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 13:31:05 +1000, Tamyka Bell wrote:

    > I suppose if I ever bought a carbon latte racer, I'd have a chance of
    > finding out. But I wouldn't be taking it offroad. ;)


    What is it about lattes? I'll have to take note of who orders them after
    rides, and see whether there are any common character traits.


    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  16. Parbs

    Parbs Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" wrote in message ...
    >
    > I suppose if I ever bought a carbon latte racer, I'd have a chance of
    > finding out. But I wouldn't be taking it offroad. ;)
    >

    Why not?

    http://singlespeed.smugmug.com/photos/36788449-M.jpg

    OK, so it's not really a road bike and the frame is aluminium - the forks are carbon.


    Parbs
     
  17. Parbs

    Parbs Guest

    "Michael Warner" wrote in message ...
    >
    > What is it about lattes? I'll have to take note of who orders them after
    > rides, and see whether there are any common character traits.
    >

    I'll have a flat white thanks with one sugar or a Coopers Sparkling Ale

    Parbs
     
  18. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Parbs wrote:
    >
    > "Michael Warner" wrote in message ...
    > >
    > > What is it about lattes? I'll have to take note of who orders them after
    > > rides, and see whether there are any common character traits.
    > >

    > I'll have a flat white thanks with one sugar or a Coopers Sparkling Ale
    >
    > Parbs


    While you're at it, can you get me a flat white or a pint of Guinness?

    Tam
     
  19. "Michael Warner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 6 Jan 2006 02:12:02 GMT, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >
    >> percentage wise, they are negligibly wider than roadbikes as far as
    >> your average car is concerned.

    >
    > What is the relevance of the width of a car? The point is that I have
    > to give them a significantly wider berth than road bikes.


    My off-road MTB has bars that are 64 cms wide, as opposed to the average
    road bar at around 40 cms (they should be abbout the width of your
    shoulders) so there's 24 cms difference. But wait, it's only the right side
    of the bar that matters when passing, so it's 12 cms wider that you are
    forced to ride.

    So because of a 12 cm passing difficulty you're proposing to relegate all
    MTB riders to a lesser road system.?

    Stop being a pompous arse!

    Peter
     
  20. "Theo Bekkers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:43bddc[email protected]
    > Peter Signorini wrote:
    >> "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:

    >
    >>> Clipless pedals aren't needed to ride a pushbike. Hell, tying your
    >>> feet to the bike isn't needed.

    >
    >> Not needed, but if you ride a lot, for longish distances, climb hills
    >> or ride a MTB on forest tracks, they do make your riding an awful lot
    >> better. Your choice, ignore those with experience if you like.

    >
    > Sounds like an argument for having a 4WD.


    Yep, interesting concept. But my clipless pedals dont chew up megalitres of
    fossil fuels. Using that argument maybe you should throw away the chain and
    go back to a direct-drive penny farthing? Or just run.

    Cheers
    Peter
     
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