New Year pedolutionists

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Euan, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. Euan

    Euan Guest

    Michael Warner <[email protected]> writes:

    > In principle it's great to see people out riding on the work. In practice,
    > though, I wish the ones on mountain bikes - nearly everyone I pass - would
    > either pick another road (than the one I happen to be using!) or ride them
    > in the mountains they were designed for.


    It's not the bike, it's the rider. Granted a mountain bike isn't the
    ideal tool for the job in most occasions but there's nothing wrong with
    them being on the road.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     


  2. Euan

    Euan Guest

    Michael Warner <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:04:52 GMT, daveL wrote:
    >
    >> I'm not entirely sure what this comment is getting at though.

    >
    > Ok, I'll spell it out - the problem is that MTBs are slow and wide,
    > and trying to pass them safely is often a bit of a worry in busy traffic.


    Then exercise some god-dammed common courtesy and wait. You have no
    right to go faster than the person in front of you.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  3. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 09:51:56 +1100, DaveB wrote:

    > Hmmm, well I use them on the commuter and the SS. On the commuter because
    > I don't trust my ability to unclip quick enough in CBD traffic,


    Obviously this is a personal thing, but I can get out of a clipless pedal
    way quicker than I can get out of a properly tight toe strap. And if the
    toe strap is loose I find I might as well just ride a decent flat pedal.

    Still, if you're happy with the way you've got your bikes set up, keep
    riding them that way.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "The wages of sin is death, but so's the salary of virtue, and at least
    the Evil get to go home early on Fridays" - Pratchett
     
  4. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 02:46:22 +0000, Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > Who doesn't start from "look you lower life form, learn How We Do It or
    > sell the thing"


    Why is that we have to be nice to get people riding bikes, but no matter
    how much we try the above approach weirdos crawl out of the woodwork on
    Usenet?

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "The wages of sin is death, but so's the salary of virtue, and at least
    the Evil get to go home early on Fridays" - Pratchett
     
  5. Euan

    Euan Guest

    "Andrew Price" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Euan wrote - .
    >>
    >> While the roads are still relatively quiet it's obvious that there's a
    >> lot of new cyclists out there. Great, numbers on the road are our best
    >> defence...[but]... Many of these pedolutionists have limited cycling
    >> skills.

    >
    > I think this might be the point at which the various State cycling groups
    > could actually do some good if they understood their function better -
    > people have made the effort to get a bike, get out of the car and ride on a
    > city road. That commendable start will very likely IMHO fail because they
    > will get sore or scared or fail to find kindred spirits on the road which
    > add so much to the enjoyment of cycling..


    I don't think it's so much a question of state cycling bodies not
    understanding their unction but one of having limited resources. At
    such a level these initiatives cost a considerable amount of money and
    time; something that can be hard to get past the board when all that's
    being passed on is education which has little tangible to point the
    finger at in the annual reports.

    What's needed is a more grass roots approach such as you outlined later
    in your post. I'm assuming the bunch was a roadie bunch? Therein lies
    the first problem, commuting cyclists are (generally) solitary souls.
    It's relatively easy for a new roadie to find a group and that's great
    because a lot of roadies also commute. That doesn't help people such as
    myself who do most of their miles solo.

    > If you can remember back to that time we all went through when it was all
    > new and confusing


    Not really, I was about five. That's one of the biggest problems
    Australia has, a lost generation of cycling.

    In the UK I didn't get ferried around to the various out of school
    activities, I rode. Everywhere. And that was considered normal That
    doesn't happen here, in fact it doesn't happen much in the UK now.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  6. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 23:05:07 +1030, Michael Warner wrote:

    > In principle it's great to see people out riding on the work. In
    > practice, though, I wish the ones on mountain bikes - nearly everyone I
    > pass - would either pick another road (than the one I happen to be
    > using!) or ride them in the mountains they were designed for.


    Why? Why should I find an alternate route, or buy another bike [1]. I can
    ride a mountain bike with knobbies to Sydney CBD from here in just under
    an hour. My record on a slicked up commuter is 48 minutes, and it's
    normally low 50s, so we're talking about a 10% speed difference. That's
    really not that much, and if I were to only have one bike it'd be one I
    can take where I really enjoy riding - offroad.

    I suspect you're seeing new riders who've bought a "do everything" bike
    that's also more comfortable *for a beginner rider* than a roadie. Yes,
    the roadie will be more comfortable for long distances, and once you're
    used to it. But mountain-style bikes are cheaper than roadies, and even
    decent off road capable bikes start at about $700, vs about $1000 for the
    cheapest "real" roadie I've seen.

    [1] We'll ignore the fact that I have a dedicated commuter with 700c
    wheels. It's got a flat bar and disc brakes. We'll also conveniently
    ignore the ruling that I'm not allowed to buy any more bikes until I've
    got room for them.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "The wages of sin is death, but so's the salary of virtue, and at least
    the Evil get to go home early on Fridays" - Pratchett
     
  7. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 12:34:31 +1030, Michael Warner wrote:

    > Ok, I'll spell it out - the problem is that MTBs are slow and wide


    Right. I was polite in my other post, but now...

    The fastest I've ever gone on a bike was 85 km/h on a mountain bike. I've
    regularly passed roadies in Centennial Park and on the road on a mountain
    bike, and I've been quicker down the hill from Waterfall on Sydney to the
    Gong because I've got better brakes.

    And I'm quite happy to wait behind a roadie until there's a reasonable
    spot to pass them.
    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "The wages of sin is death, but so's the salary of virtue, and at least
    the Evil get to go home early on Fridays" - Pratchett
     
  8. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 22:45:34 +0000, Parbs wrote:

    > 'Cause its soooo embarrassing to get passed on you carbon latte racer by
    > the guy with muddy shoes, coloured socks and helmet visor on the mountain
    > bike with big DJ forks running 2.5" tyres at 20psi and a big smile on his
    > face ;-)


    XC whippets get the shits when you do that as well, but I think I might
    try singlespeeding at the crits tomorrow.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "The wages of sin is death, but so's the salary of virtue, and at least
    the Evil get to go home early on Fridays" - Pratchett
     
  9. Euan

    Euan Guest

    "Bleve" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Euan wrote:
    >
    >> Nearly home and hear that dreaded sound (no, not that one) of brakes on
    >> rim. That's odd. Stop bike and spin front wheel. All good. Spin
    >> back. Try to spin back. WTF?
    >>
    >> Look at mech and the barrel adjuster's been wound all the way out,
    >> locking on the rear brake. Not completely but enough to cause drag.
    >> Thirty kilometers, on a day when I could actually leave the panniers at
    >> work, all with the rear brake tearing my rim apart.

    >
    > How did you manage to ride home (30km) without noticing your brake was
    > on?


    Strong headwind and not used to feel of bike without panniers.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  10. aeek

    aeek New Member

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    Um, from how I read Michael he is waiting - not like the clowns who blow past my ear at red lights.
    Showing courtesy is one thing, being happy about it can be another.
     
  11. Resound

    Resound Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > DaveB wrote:
    >>
    >> LotteBum wrote:
    >> > wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    >> > these days!?!)

    >>
    >> Hmmm, well I use them on the commuter and the SS. On the commuter
    >> because I don't trust my ability to unclip quick enough in CBD traffic,
    >> ad on the SS because I want to ride to the shops in whatever I'm wearing.
    >>
    >> DaveB

    >
    > If your toe straps are loose enough that they're quicker to get out of
    > than clipless pedals, they might as well not be there ;)
    >
    > Tam


    I've only recently gone clipless and I had straps that I could get in and
    out of quikly and easily. They were still snug enough that I could haul up
    on them and if I tried riding something with flat pedals my feet skidded all
    over the place. They were definitely doing something for me.
     
  12. aeek

    aeek New Member

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    Ceiling racks! Perfect for that empty space above the bed.
     
  13. On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 04:43:09 GMT, Parbs wrote:

    > I'll have a flat white thanks with one sugar or a Coopers Sparkling Ale


    Mmm, Coopers...


    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  14. On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 17:41:50 +1100, Peter Signorini wrote:

    > My off-road MTB has bars that are 64 cms wide, as opposed to the average
    > road bar at around 40 cms (they should be abbout the width of your
    > shoulders) so there's 24 cms difference. But wait, it's only the right side
    > of the bar that matters when passing, so it's 12 cms wider that you are
    > forced to ride.


    However, if there are parked cars or other obstacles on the left, you have
    to ride further out to avoid them, so it's the full 24cm in that case.

    > So because of a 12 cm passing difficulty you're proposing to relegate all
    > MTB riders to a lesser road system.?


    Nope, just pointing out that you're often a nuisance to roadies. The rest
    is your hyperbole.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  15. On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 08:53:50 GMT, Euan wrote:

    > Then exercise some god-dammed common courtesy and wait.


    I do wait. And wait, and wait, sometimes. And I never complain
    to them about it. Doesn't mean I have to like it.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  16. On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 20:18:18 +1100, Random Data wrote:

    > The fastest I've ever gone on a bike was 85 km/h on a mountain bike. I've
    > regularly passed roadies in Centennial Park and on the road on a mountain
    > bike, and I've been quicker down the hill from Waterfall on Sydney to the
    > Gong because I've got better brakes.


    Maybe you could come over and show our locals how it's done.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
  17. aeek

    aeek New Member

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    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 20:18:18 +1100, Random Data wrote:

    > The fastest I've ever gone on a bike was 85 km/h on a mountain bike. I've
    > regularly passed roadies in Centennial Park and on the road on a mountain
    > bike, and I've been quicker down the hill from Waterfall on Sydney to the
    > Gong because I've got better brakes.

    on gravel road downhills on my road/tourer I've often been faster than the MTBs,
    probably because I haven't dared to brake.
     
  18. "Resound" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> DaveB wrote:
    >>>
    >>> LotteBum wrote:
    >>> > wear a jersey as well), doing up his toe straps (who the f*ck uses them
    >>> > these days!?!)
    >>>
    >>> Hmmm, well I use them on the commuter and the SS. On the commuter
    >>> because I don't trust my ability to unclip quick enough in CBD traffic,
    >>> ad on the SS because I want to ride to the shops in whatever I'm wearing.
    >>>
    >>> DaveB

    >>
    >> If your toe straps are loose enough that they're quicker to get out of
    >> than clipless pedals, they might as well not be there ;)
    >>
    >> Tam

    >
    > I've only recently gone clipless and I had straps that I could get
    > in and out of quikly and easily. They were still snug enough that I
    > could haul up on them and if I tried riding something with flat
    > pedals my feet skidded all over the place. They were definitely
    > doing something for me.


    Maybe Tam is a clip system troll... ;-)

    As a toe strap wearer, I can certainly confirm what you say. It seems
    to be a myth made up by people in love with expensive "clipless"
    systems (you know, the ones with the clips) that toe straps are
    useless unless they are tight. They are not useless, and I wouldn't do
    serious riding without them. Just for starters, without them, feet
    have a habit of flying off the pedals at the most inopportune times --
    even an unexpected bump in the road could do it (and has). With
    just-tight-enough straps, my feet have never come off the pedals
    unless I wanted them to, yet I can get my feet off the pedals almost
    as easily as if the straps were not there. Furthermore, it is
    eminently possible to pull up on straps that are not quite tight, thus
    gaining a good portion of the efficiency of clips.

    It should also be obvious that *tight* toe straps are *dangerous*
    unless, perhaps, you are riding a fixed wheel on a velodrome (in which
    case, these days, you'd almost certainly be using clips instead of
    straps so you don't embarrass yourself by falling over while loosening
    straps... ;-) ).

    Cheers,

    David


    --

    David Trudgett
    http://www.zeta.org.au/~wpower/

    Although people often bemoan political apathy as if it were a grave
    social ill, it seems to me that this is just as it should be. Why
    should essentially powerless people want to engage in a humiliating
    farce designed to demonstrate the legitimacy of those who wield the
    power?

    -- Dmitry Orlov
     
  19. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 22:20:28 +1100, aeek wrote:

    > on gravel road downhills on my road/tourer I've often been faster than the
    > MTBs, probably because I haven't dared to brake.


    Also because you're a faster cyclist than the MTBers, and there's probably
    the fact you remember overtaking an MTB on dirt. The right bike certainly
    makes a difference to speed, but the rider is still providing the power -
    Brad McGee on a Kmart special would beat me on anything without 125cc of
    assistance.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "SCSI is *not* magic. There are fundamental technical reasons why it is
    necessary to sacrifice a young goat to your SCSI chain now and then."
    - Daniel M. Drucker
     
  20. On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 22:27:53 +1100, David Trudgett wrote:

    > As a toe strap wearer, I can certainly confirm what you say. It seems
    > to be a myth made up by people in love with expensive "clipless"
    > systems (you know, the ones with the clips) that toe straps are
    > useless unless they are tight. They are not useless, and I wouldn't do
    > serious riding without them. Just for starters, without them, feet
    > have a habit of flying off the pedals at the most inopportune times --
    > even an unexpected bump in the road could do it (and has). With
    > just-tight-enough straps, my feet have never come off the pedals
    > unless I wanted them to, yet I can get my feet off the pedals almost
    > as easily as if the straps were not there. Furthermore, it is
    > eminently possible to pull up on straps that are not quite tight, thus
    > gaining a good portion of the efficiency of clips.


    Serious strap systems include specially shaped shoe soles and pedals
    that can't slip apart horizontally, don't they? Do you use something like
    that, or just a standard flat pedal with street shoes? I'd be surprised
    if the latter could be set up to slip apart easily (without the need to
    loosen the strap) yet stay in securely, even when you're pulling up on
    the pedal.

    --
    Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
     
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