NewB thinking about buying Trek 1000

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by MDG23, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. MDG23

    MDG23 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey guys and gals,
    Im brand new to the whole cycling thang. A friend got me interested in it and I was able to go to San Fransisco to watch the Tour of California and I am getting really intersted. I live in Northern California and am literally like half of a mile away from a bike trail that spreads 30-50 miles. I have been working out in the gym since I was about 13-14 and I am almost 17 now. I think I am in pretty good shape so I have no scare to start riding. IM doing it because it looks so relaxing and I wouldnt mind dropping a few pounds. Anyway, I went to the local bike shop and started talking to thema nd they suggested a good starting bike would be the Trek 1000. What do you think? Also, how do I judge what size I need (48,50,52,54,56,58,60,.). Thank you so much in advance and I cant wait to start!
     
    Tags:


  2. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    74
    I really cannot give you any advice concerning a Trek 1000, never rode one. Your best bet would be to join your local bicycling club and let them guide you for your bicycle purchase. They will know what you want it for and can make suggestions without worrying about getting a sale, commissions, etc.

    Concerning size, any "good" LBS should be able to help you size the bicycle correctly. You can also get guidance from the bicycling club concerning this. The first thing that you should do, though, is join your club and then let them advise you. The worst that can happen is that you don't like their advise and ignore it.
     
  3. kk4df

    kk4df New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    If the bike shop does not provide fitting with their new bikes for free, look elsewhere. The Trek 1000 is a decent entry level bike. They keep it cheaper by putting cheaper wheels and cheaper components on it. My 14-year old son bought the Trek Pilot 1.0, which is a compact frame similar to the Trek 1000 but has a carbon fiber front fork. He loves the bike, and the components suit him just fine. If you're not trying to impress all your bike friends, the Shimano Sora and Tiagra components are just fine. But if you have a little more money available for a bike, I would also test ride a bike with Shimano 105 components and see the difference for yourself in how you shift gears.

    The big benefit for my son was finally getting on a bike that is fitted correctly for him. Being new to bikes, that's the big advantage that your local bike shop has over the used or internet markets. Good luck!
     
  4. bbattle

    bbattle New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2005
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    0

    The Trek 1000 is a fine entry bike; you may end up riding it for many years. I also recommend trying the 1500 to see if you prefer the better components.

    Giant, Specialized, Cannondale, Jamis, Fuji, Bianchi, Felt all make good road bikes competitive with the Trek; I'd scout out other bike shops and take as many test rides as they'll allow. Tell the bike shops you are in the market for a road bike, what type of riding you hope to do, how much you can afford.

    Keep in mind you'll need a helmet, shoes, pedals, bottle cage(s), water bottles, spare tube and patch kit, pump, etc. As you ride longer and further, you'll want a small bag under the saddle to hold your spare tube, tire levers, and patch kit. Maybe a few allen wrenches, too.

    I highly recommend a good pair of lycra cycling shorts. Cycling jerseys are much, much better than a t-shirt. performancebike.com is a good place to look for inexpensive ones.
     
  5. ryanhulce

    ryanhulce New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a 2006 Trek 1000. The newer 1000's come with a Carbon Fork, and Carbon Seat Post which takes alot of the road harshness out. I'm a light guy so haven't had any problems with the wheels. I however have had a hell of a time with the triple, and throwing my chain or just plain having troubles with the the shifting of the triple. The RD is rock soild. For me the shifting is a big enough pain I would suggest going with at least 105.

    As for the ride it is a nice smooth ride and handles fairly well given it's price point. You can always upgrade parts as you go. It will make a nice entry level bike, but I would make sure that the shop fits you properly.

    My 1000 is now just on the trainer since I have purchased a Cervelo Soloist.
     
  6. Bourne

    Bourne New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trek 1000 is great. My first and only bike so far.
     
  7. Jim R

    Jim R New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not that it means much but the issue of Bicycle magazine that just came out included the Trek 1000 as one of the recommended entry level bikes (along with the Jamis Ventura Comp - rated #1 with a compact chainring instead of the triple, and the Giant OCR 3). I have no personal experience except my Trek 2100 was a good bike before I upgraded to a Cervelo.
     
Loading...
Loading...