Newbie bike problem

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Dave B, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. Dave B

    Dave B Guest

    Hi Folks,

    I'm a newbie commuter (about 4.5 miles both ways) who just recently
    bought a Ridgeback cyclone from one of his local bike shops (Glasgow).

    I'm really enjoying it even when it has been p*ss*ng it down with rain
    (which happens on occasion in Glasgow!).

    Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which I had
    my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my front wheel it
    rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small part of each rotation.
    Is this just a slight misalignment of the wheel in the forks, i.e. I
    need to have a fiddle, or is it something more sinister wrong with the
    wheel, i.e. the shop needs to fiddle or replace. Just wanted to check
    before I have a look at it over the weekend.

    Thanks for the help

    Dave
     
    Tags:


  2. Brian G

    Brian G Guest

    Dave B wrote:
    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I'm a newbie commuter (about 4.5 miles both ways) who just recently
    > bought a Ridgeback cyclone from one of his local bike shops (Glasgow).
    >
    > I'm really enjoying it even when it has been p*ss*ng it down with rain
    > (which happens on occasion in Glasgow!).
    >
    > Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which I had
    > my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my front wheel it
    > rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small part of each rotation.
    > Is this just a slight misalignment of the wheel in the forks, i.e. I
    > need to have a fiddle, or is it something more sinister wrong with the
    > wheel, i.e. the shop needs to fiddle or replace. Just wanted to check
    > before I have a look at it over the weekend.
    >
    > Thanks for the help
    >
    > Dave
    >

    Does the rim only catch on the brake block slightly? if so, almost
    certainly your wheel is slightly out of true, i.e., the rim isn't in a
    perfectly flat plane. It's easily fixed using a spoke key of the
    correct size - you can get quite clear instructions for the job on a
    number of websites, probably just by Googling for wheel truing or
    something. If your bike shop is any good, they should be able to do a
    quicker and better job of truing it, although be warned that not all
    bike shops are what they seem.

    It's a good idea to learn how to do it, because your wheel will probably
    need such slight adjustments from time to time in future.

    --
    Brian G
     
  3. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Dave B wrote:

    > Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which I had
    > my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my front wheel it
    > rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small part of each rotation.
    > Is this just a slight misalignment of the wheel in the forks, i.e. I
    > need to have a fiddle, or is it something more sinister wrong with the
    > wheel, i.e. the shop needs to fiddle or replace. Just wanted to check
    > before I have a look at it over the weekend.


    It's quite hard to misalign a wheel in the forks (although I've done it
    :). Invert the bike, make sure the bolts/quick release is done up
    tight, spin the wheel, use the Mk 1 Eyeball to check it's straight.

    There's also a small chance your forks are out of whack if you've hit
    something hard, but you'll probably know that.

    What's more likely is that the wheel has come out of true. It's
    possible to fix this oneself with the assistance of a spoke key; the
    general idea is that you tighten the spokes on the non-rubbing side and
    slacken them on the rubbing side to haul the rim over. It really is as
    simple as that; HOWEVER it also takes a certain amount of experience and
    foreknowledge to make sure you don't overtighten/undertighten things
    and end up with a serial spoke-snapping wheel. People have recommended
    Jobst Brandt's The Bicycle Wheel as the bible of wheel-related stuff.
    Alternatively, any decent local bike shop should retrue and retension
    the wheel properly for around a tenner.

    R.
     
  4. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Dave B wrote:
    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I'm a newbie commuter (about 4.5 miles both ways) who just
    > recently bought a Ridgeback cyclone from one of his local bike
    > shops (Glasgow).
    >
    > I'm really enjoying it even when it has been p*ss*ng it down with
    > rain (which happens on occasion in Glasgow!).
    >
    > Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which
    > I had my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my
    > front wheel it rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small
    > part of each rotation. Is this just a slight misalignment of the
    > wheel in the forks, i.e. I need to have a fiddle, or is it
    > something more sinister wrong with the wheel, i.e. the shop needs
    > to fiddle or replace. Just wanted to check before I have a look at
    > it over the weekend.


    As the rubbing is for part of the wheel's rotation either the wheel is
    slightly out of true or there is some other irregularity. This could be
    either the joint in the wheel rim, the side wall of the tyre, or
    something like a peeling label on the rim.

    You say the bike is new. Most shops give a free first service. If
    you've not yet had this, truing the wheel should be included. The wheel
    seems to have gone out of true quite quickly, and this is typical of
    machine assembled wheels. Ideally you should get the shop to retension,
    retrue, and stress relieve both wheels although they may give you a
    blank look when you say "stress relieve". The wheels should then stay
    true for years.

    If you want to tackle this job yourself you could look at the following
    web page <http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html> which comes
    under the urc acronym AUSHTA (As Usual Sheldon Has The Answer). You can
    read the whole page for interest - it's a brilliantly clear exposition
    of a fascinating subject - but the bit you really need is between the
    headings "Tensioning and truing" and "Which Side of the Flange?". You
    will need a spoke key. Ideally you would also have a truing stand but
    you can do a pretty good job with the wheel in the bicycle's forks and
    using your brake blocks as gauges.

    --
    Dave...
     
  5. Dave B

    Dave B Guest

    dkahn400 wrote:

    >As the rubbing is for part of the wheel's rotation either the wheel is
    >slightly out of true or there is some other irregularity. This could be
    >either the joint in the wheel rim, the side wall of the tyre, or
    >something like a peeling label on the rim.
    >
    >You say the bike is new. Most shops give a free first service. If
    >you've not yet had this, truing the wheel should be included. The wheel
    >seems to have gone out of true quite quickly, and this is typical of
    >machine assembled wheels. Ideally you should get the shop to retension,
    >retrue, and stress relieve both wheels although they may give you a
    >blank look when you say "stress relieve". The wheels should then stay
    >true for years.
    >
    >If you want to tackle this job yourself you could look at the following
    >web page <http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html> which comes
    >under the urc acronym AUSHTA (As Usual Sheldon Has The Answer). You can
    >read the whole page for interest - it's a brilliantly clear exposition
    >of a fascinating subject - but the bit you really need is between the
    >headings "Tensioning and truing" and "Which Side of the Flange?". You
    >will need a spoke key. Ideally you would also have a truing stand but
    >you can do a pretty good job with the wheel in the bicycle's forks and
    >using your brake blocks as gauges.
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks Guys.

    I wondered what the spoke key was for on my multitool! It is due its
    free service at the end of this month so I will see if I can get the
    spokes tweeked then. I think I would rather practice on an old wheel
    before I tried it on my new one.

    I've come across Sheldon's web site before. Certainly seems like there
    is a lot of good information there. I'm beginning to realise there's a
    lot to this cycling malarky! When I bought my bike I entered into a
    whole new world....... :)

    Cheers

    Dave
     
  6. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Dave B wrote:

    > When I bought my bike I entered into a whole new world....... :)


    Welcome to it!

    --
    Dave...
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Dave B wrote:
    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I'm a newbie commuter (about 4.5 miles both ways) who just recently
    > bought a Ridgeback cyclone from one of his local bike shops (Glasgow).
    >
    > I'm really enjoying it even when it has been p*ss*ng it down with rain
    > (which happens on occasion in Glasgow!).


    That's a good sign :)

    > Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which I
    > had my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my front
    > wheel it rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small part of each
    > rotation.


    Because the rubbing is only on part of the rotation it means the wheel is
    certainly out of true. BUT the brake may also be off-centre and
    centering* it may stop the rubbing. This /might/ be all you need do if
    not bothered about a slight 'buckle'. Wheels are rarely perfectly true
    and usually don't need to be. However, I would true the wheel if it was
    out enough to interefere with braking or braking feel. This becomes more
    of an issue when you like the brake blocks set very close to the rim (like
    I do).

    Also check wheel is fitted properly and no spokes are broken.

    * http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQindex.shtml#brakes

    ~PB
     
  8. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Dave B
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which I
    > had my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my front wheel
    > it rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small part of each
    > rotation. Is this just a slight misalignment of the wheel in the forks,


    No, the wheel is slightly out of true. Machine built wheels, particularly
    cheaper ones, tend to go a little out of true. Take it into your LBS and
    ask them to true and stress relieve it. That's typically about 20-30
    minutes workshop time.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ---===***<<< This space to let! >>>***===---
    Yes! You, too, can SPAM in the Famous Brooke Rotating .sig!
    ---===***<<< Only $300 per line >>>***===---
     
  9. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Richard wrote:
    >
    > HOWEVER it also takes a certain amount of experience and
    > foreknowledge to make sure you don't overtighten/undertighten things
    > and end up with a serial spoke-snapping wheel.


    Its pretty difficult to do that by truing a wheel. Setting overall
    tension it is only really undertension that is a problem for spoke
    breakages and it is very difficult to overtension most modern rims and
    spokes unless you are going for 40 or 48 spoke wheels.


    > People have recommended
    > Jobst Brandt's The Bicycle Wheel as the bible of wheel-related stuff.
    > Alternatively, any decent local bike shop should retrue and retension
    > the wheel properly for around a tenner.
    >


    An excellent book but Sheldon Brown's web section on wheelbuilding is
    the other recommendation. Look on http://www.sheldonbrown.com
    --
    Tony

    "I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
    Anon
     
  10. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Dave B wrote:
    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I'm a newbie commuter (about 4.5 miles both ways) who just recently
    > bought a Ridgeback cyclone from one of his local bike shops (Glasgow).
    >
    > I'm really enjoying it even when it has been p*ss*ng it down with rain
    > (which happens on occasion in Glasgow!).
    >
    > Anyway yesterday when I was fitting my computer to the bike, which I had
    > my first try of today :) I noticed that when I spin my front wheel it
    > rubs agains one of the break blocks for a small part of each rotation.
    > Is this just a slight misalignment of the wheel in the forks, i.e. I
    > need to have a fiddle, or is it something more sinister wrong with the
    > wheel, i.e. the shop needs to fiddle or replace. Just wanted to check
    > before I have a look at it over the weekend.
    >


    It could be the wheel going out of true - quite normal for machine built
    wheels - in which case it a bike shop or DIY job (look under
    wheelbuilding on http://www.sheldonbrown.com). More likely though is
    the rim or brakes are slightly off centre leading to rubbing on the
    inevitable high spot as no wheel is absolutely true. Make sure the
    wheel is securely in the drop outs by releasing the quick release then
    leaning on the handlebars while doing it up. Then spin the wheel and
    look to see if the gap between the brake block and rim is roughly equal
    on both sides or whether one brake is closer than the other. There
    should be an adjusting screw/nut that allows you to recenter the brakes
    if they are off. Lastly the brakes may be set up too close to the rim
    in which case just wind the adjuster out to create more space while
    ensuring the brake levers don't go all the way to the bars when you
    squeeze hard.

    --
    Tony

    "I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
    Anon
     
  11. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > Richard wrote:
    >>
    >> HOWEVER it also takes a certain amount of experience and
    >> foreknowledge to make sure you don't overtighten/undertighten things
    >> and end up with a serial spoke-snapping wheel.

    >
    > Its pretty difficult to do that by truing a wheel. Setting overall
    > tension it is only really undertension that is a problem for spoke
    > breakages and it is very difficult to overtension most modern rims and
    > spokes unless you are going for 40 or 48 spoke wheels.


    I agree it's difficult to mess up the wheel permanently when attempting to
    correct just a few spokes, but it is all too easy to damage modern rims by
    overtension if ALL spokes are tightened too much.

    The improvement in spoke threads and nipples makes it easier to
    overtension than it was years ago. The spoke/nipple used to be the
    limiting factor (because the nipple would become too hard to turn), now
    the rim is.

    Overtensioning can damage a rim around the spoke holes, partcularly with
    single/non eyeletted ones, and lightweight 28-36h rims like Open Pro will
    taco.

    ~PB
     
  12. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 08:50:47 +0100, Dave B <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    Hi there,

    <Waves>
    >
    >I'm a newbie commuter (about 4.5 miles both ways) who just recently
    >bought a Ridgeback cyclone from one of his local bike shops (Glasgow).


    I'm a newbie with a Ridgeback Cyclone too! Hello :)



    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     
  13. Peter Fox

    Peter Fox Guest

    Following on from Tony Raven's message. . .
    >It could be the wheel going out of true - quite normal for machine built
    >wheels - in which case it a bike shop or DIY job (look under
    >wheelbuilding on http://www.sheldonbrown.com). More likely though is
    >the rim or brakes are slightly off centre leading to rubbing on the
    >inevitable high spot as no wheel is absolutely true. Make sure the
    >wheel is securely in the drop outs by releasing the quick release then
    >leaning on the handlebars while doing it up. Then spin the wheel and
    >look to see if the gap between the brake block and rim is roughly equal
    >on both sides or whether one brake is closer than the other. There
    >should be an adjusting screw/nut that allows you to recenter the brakes
    >if they are off. Lastly the brakes may be set up too close to the rim
    >in which case just wind the adjuster out to create more space while
    >ensuring the brake levers don't go all the way to the bars when you
    >squeeze hard.
    >

    Excellent answer.

    Also
    * You can have a go at _tweaking_ the spokes yourself. It is an art
    that you can quickly pick up if you're good at man-machine
    relationships. Something you might want to learn on a long winter's
    evening. (Leave wheel on bike and be systematic - only for de-kinking
    or odd spoke replacement.)

    * Adjusting brakes is a frustrating and fiddly learning curve, but
    something you'll need from time to time as they wear and lose
    lubrication. Read a book which will tell you about the many little
    adjustments that are possible. (Tip: When adjusting brakes ALWAYS try
    them out for real afterwards.)

    * If it's not broken don't fix it. Bikes like a bit of TLC but (after
    1st 100 miles) shouldn't need frequent adjusting. (Also every trip to
    the bike shop for X at £2 ends up also with Y and Z and a £50 dent in
    the plastic!)


    --
    PETER FOX Not the same since the deckchair business folded
    [email protected]
    www.eminent.demon.co.uk - Lots for cyclists
     
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